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    SSDI switch to SS at retirement age

    What about cost of living increases in SSDI that you receive over the years....Does SSDI when it converts to retirement age SS still include those cost of living increases which would make your monthly benefit stay the same amount?

    #2
    If they make a COL adjustment in SS payments for all recipients, those would apply to you too. Not done every year though, and generally significantly less than inflation rate.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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    • josieand1
      josieand1 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for your reply....Yes. but when SSDI switches to retirement SS are those COLAs that you received over the years with SSDI included when you switch to SS?

    #3
    You will not get extra credit for SSDI COLAs in the past. You will continue as everyone who only gets COLA adjustments (usually annually) based on your SS retirement age and account. You can calculate what that will be on MySocialSecurity.gov

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    Comment


    • josieand1
      josieand1 commented
      Editing a comment
      You are saying I would receive less when I switch to SS retirement because I would lose those yearly or when issued COLA received from SSDI ? I just want to make sure I'm understanding correctly. I'm just trying to find out when I switch over to SS retirement I will receive the same amount I'm getting from SSDI.

    #4
    Nothing changes except the wording on the checks, which benefit plan they're coming from (disability or retirement.) The amount stays the same.

    At least, it never goes down. Sometimes it can go up. SSDI has some deductions for things like workers comp, etc that expire when converting to SS, so some folks get
    higher amounts after converting to retirement benefits.
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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    • josieand1
      josieand1 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you so much Oddity!

    • josieand1
      josieand1 commented
      Editing a comment
      I was concerned it would go down,

    #5
    Thank you for your help KLD. I really appreciate it.

    Comment


    • SCI-Nurse
      SCI-Nurse commented
      Editing a comment
      Did you check on MySocialSecurity.gov? The SS calculator for your account can give you those answers. (KLD)

    • josieand1
      josieand1 commented
      Editing a comment
      I was able to set up a MySocialSecurity.gov account yesterday. Not much info in there just lists monthly amount distributed with the label "disability". Once I hit 65, or in my case, I think 67 that label should change to retirement like Oddity has said.
      Last edited by josieand1; 15 Aug 2021, 12:45 PM.

    #6
    The way it read to me was when I lose SSD and go to regular SS, I'll get approx. $400 less. I've had folks tell me that wasn't correct so I read it again, multiple times. I came to the same conclusion, SS is $400 less than SSD. I hope I'm wrong. I'll know for sure in a 1 1/2 years.
    Attack life, it's going to kill you anyway
    Steve Mcqueen (Mr Cool)

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      #7
      Originally posted by Gearhead View Post
      The way it read to me was when I lose SSD and go to regular SS, I'll get approx. $400 less. I've had folks tell me that wasn't correct so I read it again, multiple times. I came to the same conclusion, SS is $400 less than SSD. I hope I'm wrong. I'll know for sure in a 1 1/2 years.
      What are you reading that is telling you this?

      The folks I spoke to just the other day, at the SSA, were quite emphatic that SS disability converting to SS retirement doesn't reduce the benefit. That our SS benefit is determined once, when we are approved, and it doesn't matter which type it is, nor is anything recalculated, upon reaching retirement age - UNLESS they were deducting other external benefits from the SSDI, which they would stop doing after converting.

      So, I'm very curious what info counters this! I'm confused.

      edit: and I'm also in the same boat, in 15 years!
      Last edited by Oddity; 14 Aug 2021, 9:18 PM.
      "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

      "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

      Comment


        #8
        Originally posted by Oddity View Post

        What are you reading that is telling you this?

        The folks I spoke to just the other day, at the SSA, were quite emphatic that SS disability converting to SS retirement doesn't reduce the benefit. That our SS benefit is determined once, when we are approved, and it doesn't matter which type it is, nor is anything recalculated, upon reaching retirement age - UNLESS they were deducting other external benefits from the SSDI, which they would stop doing after converting.

        So, I'm very curious what info counters this! I'm confused.

        edit: and I'm also in the same boat, in 15 years!

        I am curious also as to what SSA is saying. I transitioned into the boat Oddity is looking at 3 years ago. I agree with what he and others have said, if you receive SSDI (an entitlement program based on work credits) things stay the same.

        The only thing that happened to me was when I hit 65 I got a letter saying that I was transitioning to retirement. There has been no change in income or anything of that sort.

        A plus has been that I have been able to pick up reasonable supplemental insurance, Medigap plan. (But that is elective, not an SSA requirement.)

        I have known people who get some SSI and SSDI (usually because they did not have enough quarters of work for a benefit amount that would exceed SSI, so the two combined bringing the Social Security payment up to an SSI level, $794.00 in 2021).

        Since SSI is not an entitlement program it might be impacted differently. But, from personal experience, I can say there is no change in benefit amount or COLA's when transitioning from SSDI to SSA Retirement.
        Last edited by ChesBay; 15 Aug 2021, 11:32 AM.

        Comment


        • josieand1
          josieand1 commented
          Editing a comment
          So the COLAs you received over the years when issued on SSDI transferred over to SSA retirement and you received the exact monthly total amount, correct?

          I have Medigap Plan C and they do increase that yearly, FYI, but there is a limit on what Medigap Plans can charge or there used to be.. Mine is now about $375/month. I don't remember what it was when I got it in 2002.

        #9
        Yes, you should get the same amount as you receive on Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) in retirement. The possibility for a substantial COLA this year is being discussed at approximately % 6.1 if that is what it ends up being you will get your retirement benefit amount increased that much just as you would on Disability, SSDI.

        Re: Medigap, mine creeps up a bit yearly also.

        https://www.cnbc.com/video/2021/08/1...-new-cola.html
        The Social Security Administration uses cost-of-living adjustments to help your benefits keep up with the pace of inflation. The 2022 COLA is estimated to be 6.2%. Here's what that means for your check.

        Comment


        • josieand1
          josieand1 commented
          Editing a comment
          Thank you for the reply.

          Yes I saw that about this year's COLA. Fingers crossed. It's a little ways off, I'm sure they will reduce that projection a bit like they do every year as it gets closer
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