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    #16
    Originally posted by Gearhead View Post
    A little off topic but still about $.
    Not sure if this is regional (county or state) or national but you can be exempt from property tax on the residence in your name, at age 65 or if your 100% disabled. Instead of a tax bill each year, you get a letter to confirm your still disabled and reside at that address. Check a few boxes and send it back to them. This has saved me thousands of $. Check with your county courthouse if your not aware of this perk.
    Hopefully available in your area.
    Shew! If we only had that here in New Jersey!
    69yo male T12 complete since 1995
    NW NJ

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      #17
      we have in florida was like a 2 and 1/2 month pay raise

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        #18
        Originally posted by Gearhead View Post
        A little off topic but still about $.
        Not sure if this is regional (county or state) or national but you can be exempt from property tax on the residence in your name, at age 65 or if your 100% disabled. Instead of a tax bill each year, you get a letter to confirm your still disabled and reside at that address. Check a few boxes and send it back to them. This has saved me thousands of $. Check with your county courthouse if your not aware of this perk.
        Hopefully available in your area.
        Property taxes are under state, not federal jurisdiction. Only a few states offer this. CA is not one.

        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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          #19
          Texas has a disability exemption, which some of the taxing authorities use to put a cap on your taxes, it can add up to a good bit of money.
          "a T10, who'd Rather be ridin'; than rollin'"

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            #20
            Originally posted by funklab View Post
            I was under the impression you can opt to keep medicare as long as you want, so long as you pay for it, regardless of your income or whatever is going on in your life. Obviously Medicare isn't going to do you much good if you're not living in the United States.

            What are you considering doing that might cause you to lose medicare?
            Yes, you can keep your Medicare, but you will need to drop Part A. If I drop Part A, I will be on the hook for all of my medical expenses going back more than a quarter of a century. This was just confirmed in a phone call with Betty Smith at the Medicare Office. My understanding is that you will then be left with Part B. I would be better off waiting until I turn 65.
            The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
            --General George Patton

            Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
            ––Paul Nussbaum
            usc87.blogspot.com

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              #21
              Originally posted by PN View Post
              Yes, you can keep your Medicare, but you will need to drop Part A. If I drop Part A, I will be on the hook for all of my medical expenses going back more than a quarter of a century. This was just confirmed in a phone call with Betty Smith at the Medicare Office. My understanding is that you will then be left with Part B. I would be better off waiting until I turn 65.
              That's quite strange. This link suggests otherwise https://www.medicare.gov/manage-your-health/i-have-a-disability/getting-medicare-if-you-have-a-disability

              "I’m under 65 and have a disability. I’d like to go back to work. Can I keep my Medicare coverage?
              Yes. You can keep your Medicare coverage for as long as you’re medically disabled. If you return to work, you won't have to pay your Part A premium for the first 8 ? years. After that, you’ll have to pay the Part A premium.
              If you can't afford the Part A premium, you may be able to get help from your state. You may be eligible for the Medicare Savings Program called the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) Program, which is a state program that helps pay Part A premiums, Part B premiums, and other cost-sharing (like deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments) for people who have Part A and limited income and resources."


              I'm certainly no expert, but I've never heard of Medicare part A coverage expiring and you suddenly owing for everything they covered. That seems pretty bizarre. The link would suggest that even your part A premium should be free for 8.5 years.

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                #22
                Originally posted by funklab View Post
                "I?m under 65 and have a disability. I?d like to go back to work. Can I keep my Medicare coverage?
                [/URL] Yes. You can keep your Medicare coverage for as long as you?re medically disabled. If you return to work, you won't have to pay your Part A premium for the first 8 ? years. After that, you?ll have to pay the Part A premium.
                If you can't afford the Part A premium, you may be able to get help from your state. You may be eligible for the Medicare Savings Program called the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) Program, which is a state program that helps pay Part A premiums, Part B premiums, and other cost-sharing (like deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments) for people who have Part A and limited income and resources."
                Perhaps one may not qualify if their net worth is 7 figures. The representative at Medicare who I spoke with yesterday is also singing a different tune (reimbursement my medical expenses).
                The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
                --General George Patton

                Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
                ––Paul Nussbaum
                usc87.blogspot.com

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by PN View Post
                  Perhaps one may not qualify if their net worth is 7 figures. The representative at Medicare who I spoke with yesterday is also singing a different tune (reimbursement my medical expenses).
                  I'm fairly certain there are zero income or net worth limits on medicare. Certainly you can lose medicaid (which may be paying part or all of your premiums in some states, not sure about california) if your income or assets are too high, and you will eventually (after nine months of SGA) lose Social Security Disability payments if you are working (there is also no net worth limit to receive social security disability), but I've never heard of anyone losing medicare because they have too much money. There are billionaires who qualify for medicare. You have a slightly higher premium depending on your income, but you're not kicked out of the system.

                  As I said I'm no expert, but it certainly sounds like you're not being given accurate information. Might be worth seeking professional advice since this is a big decision. Obviously you're getting some misinformation from the social security office, I'm not sure whom you would turn to for accurate information. Perhaps a disability lawyer would be somewhat familiar with the system?
                  Last edited by funklab; 31 Jan 2020, 5:48 PM.

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                    #24
                    Another thought.

                    Are you sure the person you were speaking too wasn't misunderstanding and telling you that you wouldn't qualify for Medi-Cal when you were asking about Medicare instead? I'm sure Medi-Cal has an income and asset limit.

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by funklab View Post
                      Another thought.

                      Are you sure the person you were speaking too wasn't misunderstanding and telling you that you wouldn't qualify for Medi-Cal when you were asking about Medicare instead? I'm sure Medi-Cal has an income and asset limit.
                      Definitely Medicare not Medi-Cal. I spoke with an ADA attorney yesterday. He recommended that I call Medicare.
                      The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
                      --General George Patton

                      Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
                      ––Paul Nussbaum
                      usc87.blogspot.com

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by PN View Post
                        Definitely Medicare not Medi-Cal. I spoke with an ADA attorney yesterday. He recommended that I call Medicare.
                        Hopefully you don't get Betty Smith on the phone again.

                        Let us know how it turns out!

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by PN View Post
                          Definitely Medicare not Medi-Cal. I spoke with an ADA attorney yesterday. He recommended that I call Medicare.
                          PN, I am almost certain that if you drop Medicare A you lose the ability to buy into Part B (rather stupid as they make their money on Part B from those with annual income above about $220k) . You can keep everything if you move to Puerto Rico. If you are thinking Canada you might want to call their nearest consulate and ask. I am fairly sure they will send you a pack of stuff on fulltime residency. If you are working up there as an employee you often have a chance to buy into better grade insurance than the guarenteed health plan.
                          Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                          Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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