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Para Work Status - full time, part time, disability?

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    #46
    If I wasn't so sick all of the time, I'd apply to be an air traffic controller ... it's like two years of classroom and simulation .. then a year with a licensed controller. Exciting job I would think ... boring up north though. lol
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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      #47
      Originally posted by MNicholson81 View Post
      Hello,

      I am curious, how many of us work full time, work part time, or can't work and receive disability? I have been a para for about 6 six years now and continue to work full time. Very hard and stressful on my body and just curious of everyone's situation.

      Thanks for replying!

      Mike
      I was 37 when injured and continued working after that as a mechanical engineer at a power plant. T6 complete. After 16 years of pushing through gravel, broken pavement, and up steep inclines every day, I was done. A balky left shoulder sealed the deal. Working from a chair is a giant PITA when the job normally requires climbing ladders, getting into tight spaces, etc. You get tired of asking for help real quick. But you probably know that already.

      I went so far as to take the LSAT and apply for entry into law school a few years after returning to work. I was accepted at UNM, but I was battling recurrent UTIs for years after I got out of rehab. My reality was that I needed to stay put and get my health under control. By the time that happened, I would be giving up quite a bit financially if I left, so I hung in there. I retired the nanosecond I was eligible. That was eight years ago. Life is pretty boring now since the majority of my time is spent managing my declining health interspersed with some trivial everyday tasks. But returning to work is a non-starter.

      I applied for disability and was approved with no issues after retiring. SCI is definitely a no-questions-asked disability. Reminds me of the Family Guy episode where Peter, Joe, and Quagmire are getting ready to go somewhere in Peter's car. Joe is in the backseat and complains that the seat belt buckle won't latch. Quagmire turns to him and says: "What could possibly happen to you that hasn't already happened?"

      Anyway, working at a job you like that can accommodate your disability and not require too much assistance would be my dream job. Most upright folk would agree, minus the whole disabled thing. I admire crips that are out there in the real world earning a paycheck because I know how difficult it really is. I'll admit I'm a little jealous of Ti. NASA designer sounds fun. I'm just not that smart.....

      You'll know when you can't do it anymore. Just be aware that being retired can be pretty boring, so have a plan in mind if you quit.

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        #48
        I was diagnosed with a degenerative nerve disorder at 14. Went to college for two semesters but wasn't into it. I wanted to be a taxidermist and I did that as an employee for 7 years. At this point I could still walk and the hand and arm involvement were minimal. From that I became interested in sculpting, got a job at an art foundry, and did that for about 7 years. By now I was using a crutch to walk. I never could make enough money selling my work to fully quit my foundry job, and a chance meeting with one of our clients changed everything. She was casting and selling most of her work in resin to a hobby market, so I begin doing that and was able to quit my job. I am now 50 and have been a full time chair user for the past 8 years. I am having so much weakness in my hands and arms that I know applying for SSDI is
        something I must do soon. It was a great life, tho. I was able to live where I want and work when I want, go play when I want, sleep when I want, etc. I didn't make much money and didn't marry money, so transitioning to SSDI is going to be pretty brutal financially. At least I got to do a lot of adventuring when I was young, though.
        chair user since 2009 from a neurological disorder

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          #49
          My son is an c4-5 quad was injured at the age of 14 and with help from vocational rehab, Medicaid for his attendant care ( will have to participate in the NYS medicaid buy in program soon ), and perservance he attended college and law school and just started working as an attorney and lives 250 miles from us and lives independently,

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            #50
            Just my situation, 61 years old t12-l1 para for almost 34 years been working full time since 1988. 65 is in sight

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              #51
              C7 injured at 19, 28 years post, working FT for 22 years in a competitive line of work. I would like to work as long as possible. Work is a blessing!

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                #52
                • 16 at the time of injury and 30 now
                • I missed a year of highschool, did online schooling to catch up on my junior year as well as some senior year classes. Returned to highschool to graduate normally in 2006 (a year later than what I was supposed to). Started out pursuing a 4 year degree, but after only going part time for 2 years and not really putting a dent into the required courses I switched focus and pursued an Associate degree in Computer Information Systems in 2008. I graduated in December of 2010, started my first job in January of 2011. Worked full time ever since.
                • C5 complete
                • Started out as Tier 3 Technical Support at a cable company called Spectrum (formally known as Brighthouse Networks). Got promoted to Team Lead in January of this year.
                • Only made $650 a month on SSDI prior to getting a job. Wanted to live as normal as I could so I went to college, got a full-time job that made significantly more than $650 a month with great insurance. Going on 7 years with the company!

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                  #53
                  Amazon hires people to do customer service from your home, need a computer and a phone. You can set your own available hours.

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                    #54
                    I have T11 paraplegia since 1987. I was in college at the time and went back and got a bachelor's degree in 1992. From 1994-2016 I worked from home as a medical transcriptionist and made pretty good money but due to technology/sending work overseas the income became quite low starting in 2009. From 2014-2016 I made preparations to become a certified tumor registrar - a certificate (you need an associate's degree if you don't already have a bachelor's) in cancer registry management from a community college on-line program - I paid for some of it myself, some assistance from my state's vocational rehab, and a $500 scholarship from the college. Part of the curriculum involved some hours doing a practicum at a hospital with a cancer registry department. Then I had to pass a certifying exam to earn the CTR credential. This is an in demand job and it was not difficult to find one in the field. In fact, I have two. I was not planning on working at home, I was going to move where a job was, but hospitals are starting to offer more remote positions in this field as it can be difficult to find a qualified person in their area. I do both of my jobs from home. I have to keep up with continuing education requirements. Sometimes there's an opportunity to travel for a conference.

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                      #55
                      I’m a T2 complete. I’ve been injured for 7 years now and I will be 36 at the end of this month. Next Monday will be my first day back to work. I have a BBA in finance and economics and was working for Labcorp before my injury. After several months of sending out resume and cover letter, I’ve finally decided to go back to Labcorp and do what I was doing before. The only downside is that I get bored easy and this position is not that challenging to me. Imagine sitting in front of a computer with 2 monitors all day is a bit too much. Let’s see how it will go.
                      T3 Complete
                      to my alarm: "quiet b*tch! I know what I have to do every two hr. Argggggg!!!!"

                      sigpic

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                        #56
                        Originally posted by tinng321 View Post
                        I’m a T2 complete. I’ve been injured for 7 years now and I will be 36 at the end of this month. Next Monday will be my first day back to work. I have a BBA in finance and economics and was working for Labcorp before my injury. After several months of sending out resume and cover letter, I’ve finally decided to go back to Labcorp and do what I was doing before. The only downside is that I get bored easy and this position is not that challenging to me. Imagine sitting in front of a computer with 2 monitors all day is a bit too much. Let’s see how it will go.
                        Hey, I got me a degree in economics too... in my experience it's pretty useless, but so are most undergrad degrees at the moment

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                          #57
                          Incomplete L1 and some T's was a self employed marine engineer prior. after several years of heavy drinking one of my old customers gave me agood reference to a marine electrical service company. The review they got must have been pretty amazing because they spent over six months just trying to get in touch with me to offer me a job. I began working for themin October of 2016 as their division manger for their california division. At first I was killing myself working sixteen + hour days because My work ethic is very high, and since I was in training and didnt know how to do anything I only billed the for what I felt was a fair number of hours to accomplish whatever I did. As such although I was working long days for the first month or so I was only billing like 10 hours/week. THat's just me. If it took me 10 hours to fill out a form that i thought should have only taken an hour I billed an hour. I continued like this for the first 9 months until my ttw ran out despite the long hours I never billed any overtime. The big plus to this job though is that they mailed me a laptop and a cell phone and I work from home. SInce prior to my injury I was self employed I already had a bitchin home office with everything that I could ever need to do my job which was a plus for them. Although they did buy me a new printer when mine died which I thought was nice. I do the majority of my work through email and rarely have to leave home to check on the work that my employees are doing. Back for the first 4 or 5 months my body was not used to working any more though so every couple of weeks or so it would just shut down on me. It didn't matter where I was or what I was doing at the time I would just shut down. I could be sitting in my chair or sometimes I would wake up lying on the floor oblivious to how long I had been out for. It was usually around 36 hours or so before I would slowly wake up and then go back to working. Currently I am working reduced hours and duties. I am salaried making $1068/month and am only expected to put in 2 hours/day or so. Since I am now very proficient at my job that is actually more time that it takes me to perform my duties. Before my injury I made some really good money and a $1000.00 was nothing I often made that much in a day, but after adjusting to living on SSDI for 5 years getting an extra $1000/month that I can spend on anything I want is huge!
                          Last edited by nauticalmike; 25 Jan 2018, 10:30 PM.

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                            #58
                            I am a T-12 Complete, injured in late 2007(18 years old). I did not work for the first 4 years roughly. I had a decent insurance payout, plus they were paying my lost wages. I then went back to school in 2012 for my office administration and began working for my local health region(FT) in early 2013 and haven't looked back since. I'm not making much more money by working, but i couldn't imagine not working now!
                            -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            T12/L2 Complete - Nov. 12, 2007


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