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    Quiting work and SSDI

    I am T-4 and have been working for 30 years and have been having a lot of issues with my shoulders and hands making it difficult for me to transfer. Lots of problems with my skin on my butt sitting all day. Was wondering if I would have any issues getting back on disability if I decided to quit work. Has anyone had any experience trying to get back on disability? Not sure if a person would get the full SSDI estimate for disability once they quit or how they figure it.

    #2
    As long as you have sci and use a chair for mobility as a consequence, you should be eligible for SSDI as soon as you stop working. Once had the SSA Disability Determination manual and not working should be the only criteria for you. You should be able to access info on your SSDI entitlement at ssa.gov. The only problem would be the 24 month wait for Medicare.

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      #3
      Originally posted by ancientgimp View Post
      As long as you have sci and use a chair for mobility as a consequence, you should be eligible for SSDI as soon as you stop working. Once had the SSA Disability Determination manual and not working should be the only criteria for you. You should be able to access info on your SSDI entitlement at ssa.gov. The only problem would be the 24 month wait for Medicare.
      It is 6 months before you actually receive a check after getting approved
      Last edited by jschism; 12 Jan 2016, 11:01 AM.

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        #4
        "Everyone eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits is also eligible for Medicare after a 24-month qualifying period. The first 24 months of disability benefit entitlement is the waiting period for Medicare coverage."
        1. https://www.ssa.gov/disabilityresearch/wi/medicare.htm



        "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

        "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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          #5
          Do you have short term / long term disability (LTD) with your employer?

          Since you cite medical issues as a reason for retiring it can make it the easiest way to make financial transition easiest to stop working if you have income during ( and after) transition to SSDI / Medicare status.

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            #6
            I have no long term disability. I suppose that I will have to pick up some health insurance or be fined under the affordable care act. Does the 24 month waiting period begin when I apply for SSDI? Then are you back payed if it takes 6 months for approval?

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              #7
              Originally posted by Mike_Stan View Post
              I have no long term disability. I suppose that I will have to pick up some health insurance or be fined under the affordable care act. Does the 24 month waiting period begin when I apply for SSDI? Then are you back payed if it takes 6 months for approval?
              You usually aren't eligible for SSDI if you are working full time.
              When you apply for SSDI you get first benefit check after 6 full months of disability.
              From SSA Page :
              " If your application is approved, your first Social Security benefit will be paid for the sixth full month after the date we find that your disability began.

              For example, if your disability began on June 15, 2015, your first benefit would be paid for the month of December 2015, the sixth full month of disability.

              Social Security benefits are paid in the month following the month for which they're due. This means that the benefit due for December would be paid to you in January 2016, and so on."

              https://www.ssa.gov/planners/disabil...val.html#&sb=1

              You can start Medicare coverage 24 months after first SSDI benefit check.
              From SSA page :
              "We automatically enroll you in Medicare after you get disability benefits for two years. The two parts of Medicare we enroll you in are hospital insurance and medical insurance."

              https://www.ssa.gov/planners/disability/dapproval4.html

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                #8
                Strongly urge you to apply for Long Term Disability (LTD) if it is offered by your employer's insurance. Do this before leaving employment. Alas, I didn't do so, not wanting to pay the monthly premium as a new worker. After retirement it was offered again while I was getting employer retirement pension. This time I applied for it and there was a specific rejection 'for a paralyzed person in a wheelchair'. There was no such statement or medical review when I was an employee.

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                  #9
                  I have LTD through my company, from my understanding of it if I quit working merely being paralyzed would not make me eligible for it since I worked with that particular injury. Something new would have to trigger it (shoulder injury, etc.) that was a "new" injury. In other words if you sign up for LTD it does't include coverage for existing conditions.

                  Originally posted by triumph View Post
                  Strongly urge you to apply for Long Term Disability (LTD) if it is offered by your employer's insurance. Do this before leaving employment. Alas, I didn't do so, not wanting to pay the monthly premium as a new worker. After retirement it was offered again while I was getting employer retirement pension. This time I applied for it and there was a specific rejection 'for a paralyzed person in a wheelchair'. There was no such statement or medical review when I was an employee.

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                    #10
                    That is generally true. After a particularly lucrative job offer, I considered leaving the homeschooling profession to go back to full-time career work. After talking to my LTD advocate I found out very much the same thing as t8burst described. Working with my SCI, no matter the challenges, would disqualify me from using SCI has a cause to return to LTD benefits. Complications associated with SCI would, with the same gravitas and weight as SCI, but not the SCI itself. I think that is quite stupid. It seems most of the incentives are to stay on disability, which is counterintuitive, IMO. I'd think the LTD companies would encourage working even if it only saved them a decade of payments, or so.
                    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Oddity View Post
                      That is generally true. After a particularly lucrative job offer, I considered leaving the homeschooling profession to go back to full-time career work. After talking to my LTD advocate I found out very much the same thing as t8burst described. Working with my SCI, no matter the challenges, would disqualify me from using SCI has a cause to return to LTD benefits. Complications associated with SCI would, with the same gravitas and weight as SCI, but not the SCI itself. I think that is quite stupid. It seems most of the incentives are to stay on disability, which is counterintuitive, IMO. I'd think the LTD companies would encourage working even if it only saved them a decade of payments, or so.
                      I found this to be very true. Also, if you work part time while on SSDI while being below the $750 limit to avoid penalties, it seems they constantly bug you about why you can't go out and get a full time job. Like working 12 hour weeks is just like a 40hr work week. The system sucks

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