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    when to discuss work accommodations?

    I'm starting a new job starting in a few weeks and I have not met my manager or new peers yet. I have only had interactions via telephone. When is it appropriate to bring up the accommodations I may need for the job and to discuss my disability?
    Daniel

    #2
    after they meet you.

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      #3
      My concern is that my new manager could feel that I've misled him because I have not disclosed my mobility requirements; do people think it's worth bringing up before my start date?
      Daniel

      Comment


        #4
        I think, if you've already been hired, then bring up possible accommodations right away. You don't want to get to work and find out your office is on the second floor with no elevator.

        Also, I agree that it might a shock and offense to them that you show up for work and "Surprise! I'm in a wheelchair!" It's a good strategy to not bring it up before you're hired (that's what I did years ago for a job), but letting them know right away after you're hired will be beneficial for everyone, especially if there are any changes at their offices necessary.

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          #5
          I agree with the rest Dan. If they hired you without a face to face, bring it up as soon as possible after you meet them.

          You mobility requirements don't prevent you from doing the job right? It shouldn't matter but it may be awkward if like Scorpion says "you show up and your office is on a second floor with no elevator".

          Good luck in the new position. Congrats.
          T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

          My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

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            #6
            Google the address, look at it from street view to see if it is a multistory building and how tall, follow your gut from there.
            I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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              #7
              Disclose before you show up

              Comment


                #8
                I overlooked the part about you already having the job. If that's the case, then yeah, give them a call and chat about it. 10:1 says it won't be a big deal.

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                  #9
                  He doesn't have the job for a few weeks. It could evaporate if he isn't careful enough.
                  I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I agree with everyone else here saying address this as soon as possible. If there is a human resources department, then give them a call before you start work and discuss the accessibility of your workplace and any accommodations you might need. If there's no HR, then go to your direct supervisor. Good luck!

                    As long as this thread is happening on this topic, I'm going to take the opportunity to ask a question. I don't want to hijack the thread, but it seems on topic.

                    Google street view can obviously help you look at the outside of a building to see the style. You can see if it is a newer build and then know that it is most likely accessible. If it looks like an older build, what should your next move be? It seems like if you ask an interviewer about accessibility, you tip your hand, but then maybe you just have to sometimes.

                    Has anyone found an effective way to deal with asking about workplace accessibility in phone interviews? I am not okay with just leaving things to chance, showing up for work on day one and hoping that the interior will be completely accessible. I learned this lesson the hard way, when I showed up to intern with a nonprofit housed in a four story brownstone. I have considered scoping out a potential workplace in person in the past, but then found this to be impossible as I ended up interviewing for jobs seven hours from where I lived. Any thoughts are appreciated. Thanks!
                    In our world constituted of differences of all kinds, it is not the disabled, but society at large that needs special education...to become a genuine society for all. -Frederic Major, Former UNESCO Director General

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by darkeyed_daisy View Post
                      You mobility requirements don't prevent you from doing the job right? It shouldn't matter but it may be awkward if like Scorpion says "you show up and your office is on a second floor with no elevator".
                      This is my first new job since my injury 8 years ago, so I've never gone through this process before. It is further complicated since this is a pretty big move for me -- I will be relocating across the country (NC to CA) and so I want to take appropriate steps now to make sure I can succeed in the new job. I'm just not sure how to broach the subject with my new boss. I don't want they to rescind the offer, but more importantly, I don't want to show up (after having quit my job, sold my house and all my stuff) and get fired either.
                      Daniel

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by dan_nc View Post
                        This is my first new job since my injury 8 years ago, so I've never gone through this process before. It is further complicated since this is a pretty big move for me -- I will be relocating across the country (NC to CA) and so I want to take appropriate steps now to make sure I can succeed in the new job. I'm just not sure how to broach the subject with my new boss. I don't want they to rescind the offer, but more importantly, I don't want to show up (after having quit my job, sold my house and all my stuff) and get fired either.
                        Well, that raises the stakes. I think you have to tell them as soon as possible and let the chips fall as they may. Telling them sooner will give them time to rearrange the furniture so to speak in anticipation of your arrival. After all they picked you, they must want you. On the other hand waiting could piss them off by not giving them enough time and the downsides are not so good even if you keep the job.
                        I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Scorpion View Post
                          Also, I agree that it might a shock and offense to them that you show up for work and "Surprise! I'm in a wheelchair!" It's a good strategy to not bring it up before you're hired (that's what I did years ago for a job), but letting them know right away after you're hired will be beneficial for everyone, especially if there are any changes at their offices necessary.
                          This.
                          Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                          T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by dan_nc View Post
                            This is my first new job since my injury 8 years ago, so I've never gone through this process before. It is further complicated since this is a pretty big move for me -- I will be relocating across the country (NC to CA) and so I want to take appropriate steps now to make sure I can succeed in the new job. I'm just not sure how to broach the subject with my new boss. I don't want they to rescind the offer, but more importantly, I don't want to show up (after having quit my job, sold my house and all my stuff) and get fired either.
                            You were offered a job across country, site unseen, and are leaving your previous infrastructure/life behind and thought about not telling them about your disability beforehand?

                            You really need to get your future employer onboard and supporting you. You're making several major life changes all at once (relocating, new job, new docs, new people, ...) and with a disability.

                            What kind of injury do you have?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Patton57 View Post
                              You were offered a job across country, site unseen, and are leaving your previous infrastructure/life behind and thought about not telling them about your disability beforehand?
                              That's not quite accurate; I've never considered "not telling them." I am asking for advice on how/when to bring it up and what talking points to cover.
                              Daniel

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