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Anyone With SCI Work w/ Computers or as Programmers??

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    Anyone With SCI Work w/ Computers or as Programmers??

    Anyone with a spinal cord injuries (both quads or paras) have jobs working w/ Computers or as Programmers??

    I am looking to increase my employability as I have to go into the career area that I can physically do. My injury was at c4/5 (incomplete) Computers and programming related jobs may very well be one of them. My current degree is not bring many job opportunities in the Capitol District (of NY) where I want to stay. From a four year college I have a bachelors in history and political science and a masters in political science. Of course I feel like I wasted my time...but hindsight is 20/20. I need to do something to find a bleeping job!

    Anyone who is the computer field have suggestions on which computer/programming degree or certification program may be right for me? I'm thinking of going for a certificate program or associates degree...

    Thanks all...

    Kyle
    C4/5 incomplete, 17 years since injury

    "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” - Carlos Castaneda

    "We live not alone but chained to a creature of a different kingdom: our body." - Marcel Proust

    #2
    Been in the IT industry for little over 30 years.
    One of the best things you can do is work on the communications skill set.
    If you're programming you may not have much in the way of working with others, however, if you go in a help desk environment, those communication skills can make up for lack of experience elsewhere. Those tech skills will continue to grow as the industry changes.

    Other skill sets are based on what do you like. You shouldn't do anything you don't enjoy.
    Rick Brauer or just call me - Mr B

    http://www.riseadventures.org

    Comment


      #3
      I work as a programmer, but have been since 88 well before my SCI. It is a great job, I love it. At least for the work I do and have done in the past I have never really considered anyone who doesn't have at least a BS degree in a science related field (not necessarily CS, mine is in physics).

      It is an ideal job for someone with mobility issues. I don't really have advice on how to get from where you are to a programming job but it is worth the effort to find out if/how it is possible.

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        #4
        It seems like working after a SCI is more doable if someone has a career established before they got hurt... who knows, there are always exceptions to the rule.
        C4/5 incomplete, 17 years since injury

        "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” - Carlos Castaneda

        "We live not alone but chained to a creature of a different kingdom: our body." - Marcel Proust

        Comment


          #5
          If you like history and poll sci, why do you think that you would like computer programming? They are drastically different ways of thinking.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by nauticalmike View Post
            If you like history and poll sci, why do you think that you would like computer programming? They are drastically different ways of thinking.
            It looks like he is thinking he wants a job.

            Comment


              #7
              I have been a programmer for almost 17 years...and I agree with T8...most of the programmer positions I know require at least an undergraduate degree in computer science or something similar. There are some certification programs out there...but that will help more with some help desk stuff than actually programming. If you do an associate's degree and then get a job in a help desk situation, you may be able to go up the ladder that way. I know there are some people in my organization that worked help desk and then overtime learned enough to get into an entry level programming position.
              "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

              Comment


                #8
                Wrong time to get into the computer thing. I know so many unemployed computer programmers, web designer, graphic artists, and computer related people out there. Cracks me up many of the state rehab programs still push people into these areas for schooling, this area of education has been flooded by people over the last 10 years leaving few jobs to be had.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by jschism View Post
                  Wrong time to get into the computer thing. I know so many unemployed computer programmers, web designer, graphic artists, and computer related people out there. Cracks me up many of the state rehab programs still push people into these areas for schooling, this area of education has been flooded by people over the last 10 years leaving few jobs to be had.
                  You are in the wrong area of the country then. In the bay area it is quite the opposite.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by KyleP2112 View Post
                    It seems like working after a SCI is more doable if someone has a career established before they got hurt... who knows, there are always exceptions to the rule.
                    Loads of exceptions to this I would think. My life changing event happened when I was 15. My work experience at that time was totally incompatible with a chair.
                    Doing IT work, for the most part, does not involve my international chair of diplomacy, unless I'm doing an expo. If you do phone work, no one ever sees it and doesn't care.
                    Rick Brauer or just call me - Mr B

                    http://www.riseadventures.org

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I was a construction worker before my SCI...a plastering contractor. It was hard, physical work outdoors, and I loved it.

                      After SCI, I went to school and got a degree in Bus Admin with a concentration in MIS. Got hired while still in college by Lockheed Martin. Programming is quite different than anything I was used to doing, but I learned how to do it, and the money is good.

                      I wish you well.
                      Originally posted by KyleP2112 View Post
                      It seems like working after a SCI is more doable if someone has a career established before they got hurt... who knows, there are always exceptions to the rule.
                      Please donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org.
                      Copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature.

                      Thanks!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        It's bleeping hard to find a job with my lack of exstensive experience.

                        jschism: thanks about the good piece of advice about need a 4 year degree in computer science and that an associates doesn't get you much in the job market. Law school was an option but even beginning lawyers are having trouble finding a job around here...and law school costs some $150,000!
                        C4/5 incomplete, 17 years since injury

                        "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” - Carlos Castaneda

                        "We live not alone but chained to a creature of a different kingdom: our body." - Marcel Proust

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by t8burst View Post
                          You are in the wrong area of the country then. In the bay area it is quite the opposite.
                          Agreed...on the east coast there is a big need for people with programming skills.
                          "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Before my injury, I was in Engineering field, but didn't know anything about programming. After injury, I started a second BS in Computer Science because I thought it was the most (physically) accessible area for me. It was already 15 years ado. I don't even have any finger movement, but have been doing my job well enough. Yes, I agree. BS degree is very necessary.

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