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Why should I go back to work after an SCI?

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    #16
    I like your honesty Roller. I think every situation is different, depending on your level of disibility and what other factors your dealing with in your life. Don't worry about what people think. Do whats best for you.

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      #17
      I'm on disability through my job so I make 60% of what I used to make. I'll go ahead and tell you it only comes out to 1400 a month. I was told if I made more than 900 a month I'd have a huge deductible to get Medicaid. I get no ssdi or anything. So now I'm married and he's a teacher. Is it possible for me to get a caregiver? Medicaid? I do have a trust set up

      I'd love to work again but I have so many complications that I'm not sure how reliable I'd be. Severe pain is bad but low blood pressure will keep you down
      Www.rachellefriedman.com

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        #18
        Hey Roller88, consider becoming a disability advocate in your community...fulltime. You could be someone's worst nightmare. Keep up on what your local government is doing, sign on to help with a candidate's campaign, hell, run for office yourself.

        The full quote escapes me, but the essence is to get involved in politics as if your life depends on it....because it does.

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          #19
          I don't know about your situation but work is what keeps me sane and gives a purpose in life too. Getting out of the house and contributing to society with a decent wage is an addendum. i am a T11 complete and work full time. here i have no insurance, and living on GOV aid and care will reduce me to getting the cheapest care available and the quality of life of a beggar.

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            #20
            Originally posted by TheClrkstr View Post
            I think a better question is, why shouldn't you go back to work?

            The only reason you're not working now is you're getting a handout from the government.
            It's not a handout if you worked and paid into the system. That would be the same as saying a retiree was taking a handout for collecting SS. That's why I paid premiums for private LTD too, in case I ever became disabled I would have a safety net.
            For me it's personal satisfaction and pride. I know who I am, what I am, and at the end of the day I can look myself in the mirror and feel good about that.
            If your placing your personal satisfaction and pride in a job, then you are ultimately going to be disappointed. I don't need a job to know who I am and what I am, and I too can look myself in the mirror at the end of the day and feel good about that. Someday in the future, I may seek employment, but right now I'm satisfied with not working. I have the luxury of that choice because I planned ahead for this scenario.

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              #21
              Keeps one from going crazy just sitting or laying around all day.

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                #22
                If you don't want to work...don't. Let someone who wants work and has motivation for it have the job.

                And as an aside, nobody, even seniors, earns their full SS income, based non what they paid in, especially when you factor in medical costs.

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                  #23
                  Quality of life issue.

                  "If you are able to work you should work!" quoted by former US President Bill Clinton.

                  I got bored about 14 months post injury sitting home watching cable tv and Mtv. I was given a all expense paid college education.

                  Almost post 25 years later I have a better quality of life and living. I have a new accessible home I am moving in to, a beautiful wife, traveled the world, served on three advocacy boards, drive new vehicles, retirement benefits, great job and a great employer to work for. I have worked on "out of this world projects!"

                  As I said before, there are millions of dollars unspent for people with disabilities each year to go back to college and earn a degree. Once I get settle in my new residence I am going back to college and earn another degree!

                  Working gives you a better quality of life and structure in life too.

                  The choice is yours.


                  Ti
                  "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

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                    #24
                    Here's another idea: start your own business. If your income covers your needs right now and you have medical coverage, this is a great time to try to turn a hobby into a business or find some unique service you can do based on what you already know since you don't need income up front and health care costs are covered. Downside is that you might not be able to get any outside capital if you need it, unless the friends and family can be convinced to pony up.

                    My husband is starting a recording studio; in our case, I'm working so I have health care coverage for our family including him. I don't know how people are supposed to be entrepreneurs with the limited and expensive individual health care we have now. Anyway, it keeps him active and all his musician buddies think it's cool. And he can't play drum set anymore, so this way he can express his musical talent. I doubt this endeavor will return any hefty profits, but it doesn't need to.
                    *************
                    AB wife of T8 complete para

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                      #25
                      Hi Belle, I'm curious why your husband can't play drums any longer. He's T8, and to my mind he should have the arm strength and balance to keep playing. Is there something I'm missing? I don't know that much about drum sets...
                      Originally posted by Belle View Post
                      Here's another idea: start your own business. If your income covers your needs right now and you have medical coverage, this is a great time to try to turn a hobby into a business or find some unique service you can do based on what you already know since you don't need income up front and health care costs are covered. Downside is that you might not be able to get any outside capital if you need it, unless the friends and family can be convinced to pony up.

                      My husband is starting a recording studio; in our case, I'm working so I have health care coverage for our family including him. I don't know how people are supposed to be entrepreneurs with the limited and expensive individual health care we have now. Anyway, it keeps him active and all his musician buddies think it's cool. And he can't play drum set anymore, so this way he can express his musical talent. I doubt this endeavor will return any hefty profits, but it doesn't need to.
                      Please donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org.
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                        #26
                        Originally posted by rdf View Post
                        Hi Belle, I'm curious why your husband can't play drums any longer. He's T8, and to my mind he should have the arm strength and balance to keep playing. Is there something I'm missing? I don't know that much about drum sets...
                        Kick pedal, high hat pedal.

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                          #27
                          D'oh! Thanks jschism.

                          I wonder if he could rig up hand controls for those, or would he be using his hands for drummin' at the same time he needed to use the pedals. Or pre-record the drum effects of the foot pedal stuff, if that's possible.
                          Originally posted by jschism View Post
                          Kick pedal, high hat pedal.
                          Please donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org.
                          Copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature.

                          Thanks!

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by rdf View Post
                            D'oh! Thanks jschism.

                            I wonder if he could rig up hand controls for those, or would he be using his hands for drummin' at the same time he needed to use the pedals. Or pre-record the drum effects of the foot pedal stuff, if that's possible.
                            I use my elbow on my rock band drums.
                            there's a guy that is a para and he designed a system using triggers to make a kick drum sound and had it attached to various cymbals and stuff, but that gets expensive quick doing that. He was a studio musician and probably had some endorsments to help get it done.
                            I just got rid of my drumset after 3 years, I could lift my right leg enough to play a slow simple beat on kick drum, but got tired quickly, no good way to attatch any kind of hand control for kick, it would have to be electronic.

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                              #29
                              If you can drum with 1 arm and two feet, why not 2 arms and no feet?

                              Rick Allen
                              http://youtu.be/au3qxv-FdY8

                              Travis Barker
                              http://youtu.be/xk0i3D3kluU

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                              http://youtu.be/6BcPEaKvazo
                              http://youtu.be/Rf15h3PYGQw
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                                #30
                                Roller88,

                                Make up your own mind, though here are a couple of things to think about, short term and long term.

                                - If you start working again, it is a one way decision unless you make an agreement with your ins company, you will not be able to go back on LTD under the original policy. Think long and hard about giving up that GUARANTEED income. Once given up, they will not give it back.
                                - Work can be a big part of your life/self image, but there are alternatives, volunteering, school, etc.
                                - Do you think you have enough energy to work 40 hrs a week? Not everyone does.
                                - Plan long term. Right now you need to be setting money aside in LONG TERM savings plans for when you reach age 67 (your normal retirement age). If you do not own your own house, start thinking about it. This could also provide a source of extra income if you can rent out a room be a source of amassing assets (assuming housing prices ever quit dropping) and may lower your housing costs long term.
                                - Note that SSDI, and LTD are only interested in your EARNED INCOME. Interest, investment income, rent, and who knows what else are not considered. Keep this in mind.
                                - Your LTD probably does not have a cost of living adjustment (COLA) that factors in inflation. A couple of years of 10% inflation will make your current LTD income much less valuable. You are 26 now, your retirement age is 67, that is 41 years that you have working against you.
                                - Going to school is good, get a good 4 year degree that will be in demand and PAY. This could be a long term goal, or a 'backup plan' if for some reason your current sources of income are no longer sufficient and you NEED to go back to work. I think you mentioned going to school for finance. If so, you could be using this for getting a job, for volunteering, and or your own financial well being.
                                - I cannot say it enough, don't be spending all your current income. With no real numbers to back it up, I would say you should be saving a minimum of 20% of your gross income, 30% would be much better. Being injured you are much more likely to require extra help/equipment that is going to $$ than the average person.
                                - Avoid spending on large SCI specialized purchases, you will lose your a$$ on them. The exception may be on a house, if done right.
                                - No matter what, keep your mind working, volunteering, school, learning new skills using online tutorials or whatever. I know/knew a guy who quit working before he was 40, by the time he was 50, he was like an old man mentally, I blame it on not keeping his mind active.

                                Good luck and keep us posted.

                                Hope some of this helps, but like all advice, take it with a grain of salt/you get what you pay for. I am sure not everyone will agree with all I have suggested, but.....
                                Last edited by Joe-MN; 21 Nov 2011, 12:47 AM. Reason: a little editing.
                                Better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.

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