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  • Ischemia Cure

    I assume most paralysis results from trauma. My situation is ischemia resulting from repairing an aorta descending to the heart that was torn during an MVA. Is there a chance for a cure for this type of paralysis? Thanks,

    Dr. Cora Nary
    You C.A.N.
    Conquer Adversity Now

  • #2
    Originally posted by Redneck
    I assume most paralysis results from trauma. My situation is ischemia resulting from repairing an aorta descending to the heart that was torn during an MVA. Is there a chance for a cure for this type of paralysis? Thanks,

    Dr. Cora Nary
    Cora, I believe that stem cell therapies will be an important part of therapies restoring function after ischemia-induced injuries of the spinal cord. Wise.

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    • #3
      just as simple as when I asked what about atrophe and I was told stem cells will rebuild the muscles and bones, but when? In the year 3535?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Wise Young
        Cora, I believe that stem cell therapies will be an important part of therapies restoring function after ischemia-induced injuries of the spinal cord. Wise.
        Thanks Wise. I think we were just passing Rutgers about the time you answered this. What a rainy ride from Connecticut. Hope you and your family are having a great holiday season.
        Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

        Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks

          Dr. Young thanks for you reply to my ischemia post. I have been and will continue to support stem cell research, despite the most recent news from Korea. Like most paralyzed folks I want my cure yesterday, however It takes considerable time and scientific effort to bring it to fruition. In the mean time it behooves us to me vocal in our march toward a cure. It takes a heap of money for research and development, and it takes a dedicated cadre of SCI guy and gals to keep political pressure on and to push our elected officials to respond to us and our needs. 2006 seems to be a good year for the cure!

          Armand Legg
          You C.A.N.
          Conquer Adversity Now

          Comment


          • #6
            redneck

            I am in similar dire straits as you. My lower spinal cord was swollen due to venous congestion, also resulting in vascular "steal", leading to massive ischemia. Let me guess, MRI's of your spinal cord show nothing significant, yet you are severely disabled.
            Dr. Young is entirely correct in his assessment that stem cells are our primary hope. However, the grim reaper in me must inform you that in this country at least, any potential therapy, by the time it would get to us, considering something worked, would take at least 20 years starting today. Let's look at the current picture- nobody is able to successfully eliminate neuropathic pain, as well as even regenerate one single damaged or dead nerve, and their are more than a billion left to go. If you visit the FDA's stem cell info page, you'll see how spinaal cord injuries are close to the back of their priorities, since they believe it is soo complex ( which it is ) that it's not worth addressing presently. What we have to do is take the registered stem cells away from these fat, pasty bureaucrats, and get them into the hands of some well-meaning renegade outside of this country. I firmly believe that the rules and regulations in the U.S. concerning clinical trials make progress very, very difficult, add to that, no one wants to get sued, since it's money after all, that is the primary concern here. If you don't believe me, give Leon Kass a call and ask his opinion.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Redneck
              Dr. Young thanks for you reply to my ischemia post. I have been and will continue to support stem cell research, despite the most recent news from Korea. Like most paralyzed folks I want my cure yesterday, however It takes considerable time and scientific effort to bring it to fruition. In the mean time it behooves us to me vocal in our march toward a cure. It takes a heap of money for research and development, and it takes a dedicated cadre of SCI guy and gals to keep political pressure on and to push our elected officials to respond to us and our needs. 2006 seems to be a good year for the cure!

              Armand Legg
              Also please try to remember that the mistakes in Korea were not in stem cell research directly applied to disease. The Korean team was trying to create personalized embryonic stem cells from clones at a higher rate than previously achieved. I think he claimed 9 out of 11 patients had cloned embryos successfully created on the first try.

              I also try to keep an eye on what the researchers in muscular dytrophy are doing for lower motor neuron problems.

              Also hoping for a MUCH better 2006!
              Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

              Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

              Comment


              • #8
                Ischemia

                Sue P. and Damagedgoods: Thanks for the posts. This will seem very strange, perhaps unbelievable--If a cure were to come tomorrow and we would have to draw in a lottery to receive the cure and I won the draw, I would give it to a young person as at my age (68) I am on the down hill side of life. Sure I want to leave the SCI life behind me, but at the same time, a young person full of piss and vinegar has many more years to enjoy life as an ex-SCI person. I don't want to come off as maudlin, but this is the time of year for retrospection and making plans for 2006. Sue, I wish that I were closer to you in miles so that we could have face-to-face conversations. You are truly a font of good information and we, on CC thankful for your contributions.

                Cleo Patra
                You C.A.N.
                Conquer Adversity Now

                Comment


                • #9
                  redneck

                  That's a very selfless, and noble attitude you have, and don't be mistaken, yourself and all of us deserve better, no matter what our age differences. I'm 34 now, and was 28 when this happened due to a doctor's bad spinal tap. Please tell me if I'm truly wrong, or presumptous, but I am envious of you, that you had most of your years, and the MOST important ones in my opinion, unscathed. Whether one's 68 or 28, in this awful situation, we all know that our lives have been cut short, some much more so than others, but no one's life, regardless of age, sex, and race, is going to end happily and pain-free, it's just that for those such as me, we have tons and tons of unaided suffering left to go. I may be only 34, but my future is over, and I forsee nothing but difficult, and bad times ahead.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    To: Damn Good

                    I took the liberty of changing you sign on name to one that's more positive. You're right as rain--I have lived most of my life unscathed. However, and I've not said this here at all, but we lost our oldest daughter to viral pneumonia when she WAS 13 years old. Believe me, that is a hurt that pains me every day. No matter our individual situation, we have to work through it and go on past. I thought I had the world by the short hairs--retired, no debts, some cash in the bank, a good marriage, collection of fine vintage motorcycles--all the things of what I believed to be necessary for THE GOOD LIFE. Well, the universe has it own way of slapping one down, way down. This SCI is the worst. Hell, if they want to really punish Saddam, cut his spinal cord high and let him figure out how to continue life while lying in his fetid urine and feces waiting for a PCA who doesn't show. But, DG, you have options. 1. You can continue to be negative about your situation.
                    2. Realize that there not much you can do about your physical condition, but you can alter, for the better your emotional condition. 3. Get out of the house, if you can. There's gotta be a way for you to leave the comfortable confines of your room, even for a few hours. 4. Do something to make your life better--take classes, get a hobby, make more friends. 5. Do something to makes some one else's life better--volunteer as a mentor, a tutor, run for public office, etc. Yes, our personal goods are damaged, but our delivery systems still work and there's a hell of a lot of good folks that need the kind of help only you can deliver. Trust me, they will not give a rat's behind when you show up in a wheelchair to volunteer your services.

                    Phil Durt
                    You C.A.N.
                    Conquer Adversity Now

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Redneck
                      I don't want to come off as maudlin, but this is the time of year for retrospection and making plans for 2006. Sue, I wish that I were closer to you in miles so that we could have face-to-face conversations. You are truly a font of good information and we, on CC thankful for your contributions.

                      Cleo Patra
                      I'm not sure I could keep up with the monikers. Multiple Personality Disorder or just funn'in? I wish I was closer to a lot of members. We used to head south a bit east of you when my in-laws lived in Florida. Just have to get some body armour before knocking on your door I think...

                      Not sure how great I've been doing as a moderator lately. I've been having a rough 2 years between my father in law dying, my Dad going through 2 stents then double femoral bypass surgery, Reggie dying, and I swear I've caught every bug around this past year. The worst seems to be past though.

                      As far as the end of the line, noble, but probably unnecessary. Among other things we need to know if age effects regeneration. In the seminar I sat in by Dr Rochkind from Israel he found that complete transections of the larger peripheral nerves took much longer to heal in those over 40. Over 40 is still kid stuff.

                      Personally I'd rank people, if it were needed, by their support, monetary or just upbeat attitudes. Many studies have proved that upbeat people heal faster so why not tilt the trials with smiling people?
                      Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                      Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                      Comment

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