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Glial Scarring

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  • #16
    I would continue with physical therapy and ask for family or a friend to be shown what you need to be doing if you are being discharged. You will need your core muscles to walk or stand so learning to maintain a hands and knees position is important. If you don't have both triceps try to get to a kneeling position with help. Stretch your inner legs, especially groin area, out first. You need to continue using and strengthening the muscles you have while waiting to see what else returns. How is your current sensation for hot versus cold and pain versus light touch?
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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    • #17
      I found it strange listening to researchers in Boston who all use methylprednisolone as a comparison in animals versus experiences recently on humans here. It is still used for MS exacerbations in many hospitals and whenever TM is suspected in most. It never was tested in penetrating injuries from what I've read and yes I would Imagine abcesses fall under that when drained/removed. But unless a surgeon has a new trick up his sleeve he should look at short term chances of infection versus long term breathing by one self or transferring with 2 good triceps or maybe walking for most of us.
      Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

      Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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      • #18
        If your abscess was pressing on the anterior (front) of your cord, it is possible that it pinched closed the anterior spinal artery, which sits on the surface of the front of the cord. Anterior cord syndrome results in loss of movement, and pain and temperature sensation below the level of the injury, but with some sparing of position and pressure sensibility. Is the the case for you, Paul?

        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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        • #19
          My sensation is pretty much normal both above and below injury level.Can tell thie difference between hot and cold and pain and light touch.Can move my legs quite well and can push pretty hard when someone is applying resistance .Moved my toes on right foot yesterday for first time!Does any of this sound like anterior cord syndrome?

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          • #20
            No, that does not sound like anterior cord syndrome. Anterior cord syndrome means you lose the ability to tell the difference between hot and cold and pin prick versus light touch. You would still maintain proprio-sensation (where you body is in space like if you close your eyes you know if someone moves a foot up or down), light touch and vibratory sense when touched by a tuning fork. Do you have spacticity that interfers with voluntary movement?
            Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

            Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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            • #21
              No,I don't have too much spasticity.My left leg shakes quite rapidly some times when I stretch and also sometimes,my stomach,especially at night.Overalll though,not too bad.

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              • #22
                Then document every new thing you can move and try to translate it to a usable ADL like transferring without help just spotter and then transferring no spotter, cathing without anothers help except set up, then no help, dressing your lower body. Each item will help get you more outpatient PT. Keep working out!
                Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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                • #23
                  This might sound like a silly question but in incomplete people can axons not "go around"a glial scar?Like if you're going down the street and something was in your way,you would go around it!

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                  • #24
                    If I'm reading this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuroglia right, the answer is maybe. Seems to be related to where the scar is.

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                    • #25
                      From all the florescent slides of injuries I've seen over the years, yes it is possible. Many are sort of pushed to the sides around an injured site and others go through in wavy paths when a contusion site has many small "dead areas". It can take time for swelling to go down enough for signals to squeeze past the now empty injured areas.
                      Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                      Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                      Comment

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