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For those who were interested, My AFO, Me - Leg Attached:) and my Son:)

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  • For those who were interested, My AFO, Me - Leg Attached:) and my Son:)

    Bonnette and those who asked about my AFO, got today, walking well with it so far, no limp, but of course doesnt make a difference in power. Pic of me with AFO and my son thrown in
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  • #2
    Originally posted by marycsm77 View Post
    Bonnette and those who asked about my AFO, got today, walking well with it so far, no limp, but of course doesnt make a difference in power. Pic of me with AFO and my son thrown in
    You did that for me, admit it.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Le Type Français View Post
      You did that for me, admit it.
      hahaha, He is your age too Todd, but lives with the girlfriend
      Last edited by marycsm77; 10-09-2010, 11:08 AM.

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      • #4
        Very nice! It's minimal, unobtrusive, and clearly it does what it was intended to do. Excellent! And may I say, you and your son are gorgeous!
        MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bonnette View Post
          Very nice! It's minimal, unobtrusive, and clearly it does what it was intended to do. Excellent! And may I say, you and your son are gorgeous!
          awww thank you so sweet of you to say, although he is actually far better looking than me

          I really should have shown you a pic off my foot, but I just got it and havent taken it off yet, my son and i went for a walk today. Of course I still have not "power" my quads dont aren't functioning well, cant walk fast or run, but the AFO has done a lot for the limp. And at least my son wasn't like crawling trying to keep step with me

          I can't believe you never had gait training??? How is your gait, do you walk with cane, AFO?? When PT had me gait training, my brain remembered so fast, the correct posture, and body mechanics, i was completely hunched over and robotic. I felt as though I was trying to re-learn something I dont remember learning to begin with you know? When do you start?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by marycsm77 View Post
            I can't believe you never had gait training??? How is your gait, do you walk with cane, AFO?? When PT had me gait training, my brain remembered so fast, the correct posture, and body mechanics, i was completely hunched over and robotic. I felt as though I was trying to re-learn something I dont remember learning to begin with you know? When do you start?
            Mary, I've had simply dreadful medical care...and I didn't even realize it until coming to CareCure and learning what real rehabilitation is. My "therapists" basically told me to get an AFO and use it for as long as it worked, and then accept the steady decline of MS. Gait training was something I'd read about in my research, and four different PTs where I live worked with me...but their idea of gait training was to observe the good leg and tell me to try to mimics its movements with the other one. No parallel bars, no posture assistance, no advice about crutches/canes, just...nothing.

            As a result, my recent meeting with genuine therapists in Denver was quite the revelation. I have almost no quads and hamstrings left, and am bent forward in the way you described yourself initially: completely hunched over and robotic. One has to hunch, in order to pull the useless leg along without falling over. Sheesh. Anyway, I go back to Denver in a few weeks for several days' intensive gait training and postural work. The therapists there say that with hard work and a new AFO (which will be customized for me while I'm there), I will be able to walk with a more normal, aligned gait and the knee pain and hyperextension I now have can be minimized. Much has been lost, but I aim to do the best I can to regain ground. Right now, I walk with a cane or elbow braces and my AFO, but the new therapists say that my existing AFO is not the right type for me and I'll need to relearn how to walk using elbow crutches, exclusively, for awhile; with practice, I might be able to return to the cane.

            Mary, I am so glad that you've gotten this AFO and have had proper gait training and PT, so that you can genuinely rehabilitate yourself to the max. You go, Mary!
            MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by marycsm77 View Post
              hahaha, He is your age too Todd, but lives with the girlfriend
              Hehe! He is a good-looking man. Congrats!

              As for your AFO, you wear that to prevent foot drop or support? Looking at your photo by the tree, you look amazingly able, thankfully, so how does the AFO help you if I may ask?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Le Type Français View Post
                Hehe! He is a good-looking man. Congrats!

                As for your AFO, you wear that to prevent foot drop or support? Looking at your photo by the tree, you look amazingly able, thankfully, so how does the AFO help you if I may ask?
                aww, thanks todd, he's a sweet kid, with a good heart too, hard to get him to smile though, very shy like his mom

                The AFO is an ankle foot orthotic and it lifts the ball of my foot off the ground so I am not dragging it. I dont have full foot drop, but the tibialis anterior muscle is very weak due to the cord compression i sustained for at least a year. At one time I could barely hold myself up. the decompression surgery, fusion, removal of the bone spurs that were pushing into my spinal cord, I have regained some return, although i will never be "normal". I really attibute a lot of it to PT to tell you the truth because I had been compensating for so long i "forgot" the mechanics of walking.

                So he AFO allows me now to walk without limping or dragging my foot, of course doesn't cure the neurological damage. It expends a ridiculous amount of energy, is painful and bad for the rest of your body to walk with an altered gait, even though of course it's good to walk. I don't have power so to speak, my quads dont "fire" as they should therefore standing for long time, running (impossible), walking up stairs anything like that is really hard, the other muscles kick in. I've been in PT on and off for 2 years, 9 months post op now. My right hand also has intrinsic weakness so OT is working on that. I of course have the nerve pain, migraines etc. still from the stenosis but they have gotten better.

                I am very lucky and grateful to walk, had I waited any longer to have the decompression surgery I may have very well been in a chair. I had an MVA when I was 21 (pre seatbelts, bags) and i was hit head on and had head trauma and my neck cracked the steering wheel literally in half. So all these years later unbeknown to me all these things were happening and when the cord was compressed to a certain degree I had rapidly progressing myelopathy.

                Thank you for asking about the AFO, you're sweet.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bonnette View Post
                  Very nice! It's minimal, unobtrusive, and clearly it does what it was intended to do. Excellent! And may I say, you and your son are gorgeous!
                  bonnette,

                  here is a pic of the AFO not on me, the parents wanted me to send them a pic. i would imagine it looks similar to yours? i think i may have problems fitting into most of my shoes except those sneaks i had on yesterday.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That looks ideal, Mary! I like the fact that it supports your entire foot, and even though it's bulkier than most shoes will accommodate, it's a lot more streamlined than most AFOs. Excellent! And nowadays there are so many attractive sports shoes with wide enough toe boxes to allow for the brace.

                    My AFO looks a bit different, because my foot has no ankle action at all...so it has a hinge at the ankle to help with dorsiflexion. It's not quite right for me, but the new one will be better.

                    Here's to many happy hours of walking and exercising and gaining strength!
                    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bonnette View Post
                      That looks ideal, Mary! I like the fact that it supports your entire foot, and even though it's bulkier than most shoes will accommodate, it's a lot more streamlined than most AFOs. Excellent! And nowadays there are so many attractive sports shoes with wide enough toe boxes to allow for the brace.

                      My AFO looks a bit different, because my foot has no ankle action at all...so it has a hinge at the ankle to help with dorsiflexion. It's not quite right for me, but the new one will be better.

                      Here's to many happy hours of walking and exercising and gaining strength!
                      thanks bonnette good luck with your new one too and your PT. Keep me updated

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by marycsm77 View Post
                        The AFO is an ankle foot orthotic and it lifts the ball of my foot off the ground so I am not dragging it. I dont have full foot drop, but the tibialis anterior muscle is very weak due to the cord compression i sustained for at least a year. At one time I could barely hold myself up. the decompression surgery, fusion, removal of the bone spurs that were pushing into my spinal cord, I have regained some return, although i will never be "normal". I really attibute a lot of it to PT to tell you the truth because I had been compensating for so long i "forgot" the mechanics of walking.
                        Oh, wow! I had no idea we had so much in common regarding our injuries. I can remember my left leg becoming weak on me weeks before the surgery to place rods in my back. Well, of course, they only ended compressing my cord even more, which lead to full incomplete paralysis. I had a decompression four months later with high hopes for return, but the damage had set in. I totally relate to your story, though, because in my own way I've experienced cord compression problems.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Le Type Français View Post
                          Oh, wow! I had no idea we had so much in common regarding our injuries. I can remember my left leg becoming weak on me weeks before the surgery to place rods in my back. Well, of course, they only ended compressing my cord even more, which lead to full incomplete paralysis. I had a decompression four months later with high hopes for return, but the damage had set in. I totally relate to your story, though, because in my own way I've experienced cord compression problems.
                          gee i'm sorry todd, that you didnt get the outcome you i'm sure expected going into the surgery, i dont know what to say, you are so young. I was told by the SCI nurse here, that she has many people in the clinic that had cervical spondylotic myelopathy like me, had there cords decompressed and came out of the surgery paralyzed. What compressed your cord to begin with do you know?

                          It took me a long time to come to the pic you see with the AFO. Before I knew what was wrong with me, of course I had the neck arm finger pain, weakness, numbness skin burning in my arms which has alot of nerve damage but I didnt know my cord was compressed. One day my gait just got funny, and a couple months later i woke up one day and couldnt stand long enough to make a cup of tea. So when they finally figured out what it was, my gait was waxing and waning from so so to really really bad. So while i'm grateful to walk, I will never walk "normal" again, probably never run and so forth. I can walk, but all the 5 year olds can beat me I have bad pain from the nerve damage and some bladder issues, balance stuff, you know, but it has gotten better too.

                          Well Todd, I dont know you, but by reading your posts you write; the sometimes a little obnoxious ones, the many funny ones, the serious ones, and the ones I like the best where you are very very compassionate when you see someone is hurting. I HAVE READ them Your a good guy
                          Last edited by marycsm77; 10-09-2010, 11:09 AM.

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                          • #14
                            I use a similar AFO in Piedro boots and find they help me to be able to take a few steps, I have Ataxia though so still need something to hold onto but means I can at least get into family members houses easier and local shops/pubs which are small and not adapted (live in village in Yorkshire, UK)

                            I can use rollator with them around house for a while and use crutches just to just go in car to families house and they help.

                            I'd like to be able to stand for longer but my arms shake after trying to hold myself up for a while and can't use arms to do anything whilst I'm holding myself up with them.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by marycsm77 View Post
                              Well Todd, I dont know you, but by reading your posts you write; the sometimes a little obnoxious ones, the many funny ones, the serious ones, and the ones I like the best where you are very very compassionate when you see someone is hurting. I HAVE READ them Your a good guy
                              Thank you.

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