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MS fatigue after exercise

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    MS fatigue after exercise

    I started about a year ago getting fatigued and less functional after exercise, which I know is an MS thing (though I’d carried the diagnosis, useless as it is, for over 15 years without experiencing this). But I started doing simple passive range of motion stretching, and I feel the same way after that. That makes me wonder about the mechanism of the fatigue, that it can occur without any exertion, but only with passive stretching. Does anyone know what causes it? Could there be some chemical that your muscles release when they are exercised in any way? Knowing that would make the problem seem amenable to an antidote. I'd love to know Wise’s thoughts on this.

    #2
    what would cause that same fatigue if you dont have Ms? if it were caused by poor diet what kind of vitamines or nutrients would help prevent fatigue?

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      #3
      Originally posted by Random View Post
      I started about a year ago getting fatigued and less functional after exercise, which I know is an MS thing (though I’d carried the diagnosis, useless as it is, for over 15 years without experiencing this). But I started doing simple passive range of motion stretching, and I feel the same way after that. That makes me wonder about the mechanism of the fatigue, that it can occur without any exertion, but only with passive stretching. Does anyone know what causes it? Could there be some chemical that your muscles release when they are exercised in any way? Knowing that would make the problem seem amenable to an antidote. I'd love to know Wise’s thoughts on this.
      I'm glad you asked this question. I was just thinking of starting a thread about how to prevent over-heating during exercise! About the only type of strenuous activity I can tolerate is swimming due to the overheating associated with other types of activity. A couple weeks (or so) ago, I rode my recumbent bike for about 30 minutes, got overheated, and was fairly worthless for about a week after that. I wish I could conquer this one myself!!!
      "The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off." -Gloria Steinem

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        #4
        Danine,
        For overheating, there are a number of products that can help. Try a web search on cooling products -- they make a vest especially for MS people, and less obtrusively there are frozen headbands and caps and patches and stuff. I think targeting certain parts or body might make a big difference, like cooling your neck or forehead... maybe places where the blood is closer to the surface? Flagging at a music festival once, I came back to life with just ice cream. Sucking on ice sometimes helps. Back when I still could NordicTrack just keeping a strong fan on me made a difference.

        For me, the fatigue is from more than just overheating though. It happens even after I swim, though it appears even worse after I lift weights, though I never do that hard enough to work up a sweat. It seems like it's related to the pure mechanics of exercise somehow, even separate from exertion. Otherwise I'm still baffled about why just passive (someone else doing all the work) stretching does it to me. My imagination speculates that maybe just stimulating muscle fibers somehow releases an exhausting chemical. So clearly I need a scientist to weigh in.

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          #5
          I recently began an exercise rehab program myself. I keep cool with these: http://www.bodycooler.com/head-bands/ Some of the supps I take to help are: CoQ10, Citicoline, & KMag-KG. Here are some links & references.
          (Some may dispute the value of this info since these are not all independent peer-reviewed published sources; Oh well.)

          J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2008 Mar 4;5:8
          http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/en...earch=18318910
          CoQ10 supplementation increased plasma CoQ10 concentrations and tended to increase time to exhaustion.

          http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m..._n5990648/pg_7
          Other trials have administered citicoline to post-stroke patients, demonstrating... including enhancement of recovery with improvements in parameters of neurological function, such as muscle strength, ambulation, and cognition.
          http://www.jarrow.com/product/288/Ci...ne_CDP_Choline

          http://www.sourcenaturals.com/products/GP1171/
          Potassium is important for muscle strength and glycogen formation, while magnesium helps store body energy as magnesium ATP (adenosine triphosphate, the body's chief energy mollecule). AKG combines with the harmful ammonia generated by intense muscle activity to create glutamine, an important energy fuel.

          Too much vitamin C?
          http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/87/1/142
          "Let your food be your medicine" - Hippocrates

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