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    #16
    Originally posted by Danine View Post
    avm???
    Arterial-veinous malformation. Try webMD.com to look it up. For some reason I'm having web problems.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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      #17
      Originally posted by Sue Pendleton View Post
      Arterial-veinous malformation. Try webMD.com to look it up. For some reason I'm having web problems.

      Thanks.
      "The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off." -Gloria Steinem

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        #18
        Originally posted by Danine View Post
        Thanks.
        It is spelled arteriovenous malformation

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          #19
          Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
          Sue, I think you mean "The Incredible Mr. Limpet".

          T2 above does not refer to the spinal cord level, but to a particular technique for doing an MRI (T2 weighted). It can be done for both brain and spinal cord and shows inflammatory changes often seen in MS.

          (KLD)
          I loved that movie!
          1FineSpineRN

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            #20
            Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
            It is spelled arteriovenous malformation

            ^^This is why I never became a doctor. I can't spell for beans. Thanks Wise. This is also why my physiatrist writes down anything he knows I'll go home and study up on for me.
            Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

            Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
              Sue, I think you mean "The Incredible Mr. Limpet".

              T2 above does not refer to the spinal cord level, but to a particular technique for doing an MRI (T2 weighted). It can be done for both brain and spinal cord and shows inflammatory changes often seen in MS.

              (KLD)
              YEA!! All I could think of was Mr Norbit.. Great movie!

              Danine T2 is also used to image other inflamation I believe. I had a spinal stroke but they still image that way to look for any changes over the years.
              Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

              Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by Sue Pendleton View Post
                YEA!! All I could think of was Mr Norbit.. Great movie!

                Danine T2 is also used to image other inflamation I believe. I had a spinal stroke but they still image that way to look for any changes over the years.

                The T2 reference was about WFE's MRI, but thanks. The info. I've gotten through this thread has been helpful.
                "The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off." -Gloria Steinem

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                  #23
                  they have been replacing discs in dogs since like 1980. I have cared for many recovering after, and almost all recovered in a matter of a few weeks. my own dog had eight replaced for a huge fee at ames in Iowa. she went down a year later, and they did the second. she recovered. how can they do this in dogs for so many years, and not yet be able to do this in people? these dogs had nothing, no pain no reflex no BB function at all.
                  also do you know what hauffmans signs is? it has been mentioned in my last two neuro exams.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by jody View Post
                    they have been replacing discs in dogs since like 1980. I have cared for many recovering after, and almost all recovered in a matter of a few weeks. my own dog had eight replaced for a huge fee at ames in Iowa. she went down a year later, and they did the second. she recovered. how can they do this in dogs for so many years, and not yet be able to do this in people? these dogs had nothing, no pain no reflex no BB function at all.
                    also do you know what hauffmans signs is? it has been mentioned in my last two neuro exams.
                    I have heard of humans getting the artificial discs too, but I think it's quite controversial. At this point, I think I'd try it if my doc would do it and my insurance would pay. I'm tired of the pain, and my back is obviously just getting worse and worse with the doctors doing nothing...so frustrating...

                    I'm sorry but I don't know about hauffmans signs...don't believe I've heard of that before.
                    "The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off." -Gloria Steinem

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                      #25
                      Hoffman’s sign

                      Hoffman’s sign

                      Hoffman's sign is a neurological sign in the hand which is an indicator of problems in the spinal cord. It is associated with a loss of grip.
                      The test for Hoffman's sign involves tapping the nail on the third or forth finger. A positive Hoffman's is the involuntary flexing of the end of the thumb and index finger - normally, there should be no reflex response.
                      Hoffman's sign is an indicator of a number of neurological conditions including Cervical Spondylitis, other forms of spinal cord compression and Multiple Sclerosis. In MS, a positive Hoffman's sign is usually caused by lesions in the motor nerve pathways on or above the place in the spinal cord where the nerves that control the hands exit (C5).
                      Hoffman's sign links:
                      http://www.mult-sclerosis.org/Hoffmanssign.html
                      also
                      http://www.wheelessonline.com/ortho/hoffmans_sign

                      Google for countless more

                      Search CC for the meaning of upper vs lower motor neuron. I still don’t get it but I remember Wise or Sue explained it really well

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