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The Earth is older than 6000 years

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    The Earth is older than 6000 years

    This is a cute blog.
    http://www.dasmirnov.net/blog?blog=3...=1&disp=single



    Hi, I'm a woolly mammoth. Me and my kind were mooping around on Earth for about 1.5 million years, my ancestors originally came from Africa but over 6 million years or so we spread out quite a bit. It was pretty cold up north and the poor mammoths that weren't as woolly died out and soon we were all woolly. We died out completely around 10000 years ago, we know this because you guys haven't found any of my kind younger than that.

    The creationists claim I died out in a giant flood which wiped the Earth clean of all life (apart from what Noah could fit on his boat). These guys claim I was around for about 2000 years, after some guy created the Earth 6000 years ago.

    So when did I really live?

    #2
    .....
    Birds Fly in Flocks, but Eagles Fly Alone...

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      #3
      Interesting

      We are still living in the dinosaur ages. We are no different than "Land of the Lost" but with a different facade.


      I would jump into the La Brea Tar Pits w/ the rest of the fossils if I could.

      Where's the cure?
      Birds Fly in Flocks, but Eagles Fly Alone...

      Comment


        #4
        The tarpits of La Brea are a good example. I don't understand how anybody who has ever visited the tarpits in LA could ever believe that the world is only 6,000 years old. I am of divided mind about this. Should we allow a museum to make the creationist case that is known to be false but is being presented as fact? How about movies that show cavemen alongside brontosauruses? I think that if there were a movie showing a flat earth, people might protest. By the way, this would not apply to movies that are fiction. For example, nobody would protest a Harry Potter movie. Wise.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Wise Young
          ...For example, nobody would protest a Harry Potter movie. Wise.
          But in fact some do! They claim it promotes witchcraft. Apparently that fantasy is too close to their perception of reality for their comfort. If they didn't think it could happen they wouldn't feel threatened.
          - Richard

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            #6
            Originally posted by rfbdorf
            But in fact some do! They claim it promotes witchcraft. Apparently that fantasy is too close to their perception of reality for their comfort. If they didn't think it could happen they wouldn't feel threatened.
            - Richard
            But apparently not promiscuity.
            "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
            J.B.S.Haldane

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              #7
              Ha ha, "mooping"! Moving + pooping?

              Comment


                #8
                Dr. Young,

                Religious dogma is stupidity by consensus.

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                  #9
                  I am unsure. Freedom of belief is a right. Most of us would probably agree that freedom to be bamboozled is a right of sorts. While most of us agree that the concept of teaching creationism as science in high school is unacceptable. However, what about parents doing home-schooling of children and teaching them that the world is 6000 yeas old. Wise.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Wise Young
                    I am unsure. Freedom of belief is a right. Most of us would probably agree that freedom to be bamboozled is a right of sorts. While most of us agree that the concept of teaching creationism as science in high school is unacceptable. However, what about parents doing home-schooling of children and teaching them that the world is 6000 yeas old. Wise.
                    I went to a Yeshiva for high school and I was taught that the world is not 6000 years old. It's less than that. Right now the world is 5,768 years old (we count our years from the Creation which means the Hebrew year is 5768). I do not think my belief in this harms society and so I do not see what is so bad about it. Especially since we don't demand that everyone else believe it.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by hardluckhitshome
                      I went to a Yeshiva for high school and I was taught that the world is not 6000 years old. It's less than that. Right now the world is 5,768 years old (we count our years from the Creation which means the Hebrew year is 5768). I do not think my belief in this harms society and so I do not see what is so bad about it. Especially since we don't demand that everyone else believe it.
                      Great point. If it doesn't hurt anyone or impede science/progress, then
                      people can believe whatever they want.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by hardluckhitshome
                        I went to a Yeshiva for high school and I was taught that the world is not 6000 years old. It's less than that. Right now the world is 5,768 years old (we count our years from the Creation which means the Hebrew year is 5768). I do not think my belief in this harms society and so I do not see what is so bad about it. Especially since we don't demand that everyone else believe it.
                        I agree. Debate and tolerance are important and censorship of opposing ideas shouldn't be forbidden.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by hardluckhitshome
                          I went to a Yeshiva for high school and I was taught that the world is not 6000 years old. It's less than that. Right now the world is 5,768 years old (we count our years from the Creation which means the Hebrew year is 5768). I do not think my belief in this harms society and so I do not see what is so bad about it. Especially since we don't demand that everyone else believe it.
                          I tend to agree.

                          But when these beliefs are taught in science classes I have a huge problem. I also get frustrated when people take the words of the Torah or Gospels literally in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

                          For example, if the Torah stated the Kotel was only 3 metres tall, but you could stand before that wall and see it was clearly much taller, would you assume your eyes were in error?

                          The actual evidence for the Earth being older than 6000 years is beyond overwhelming. To ignore all of that evidence in the name of faith does a great disservice to one of God's greatest creations - the human mind.

                          Chris.
                          Have you ever seen a human heart? It looks like a fist wrapped in blood! Larry in 'Closer', a play by Partick Marber

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by cspanos
                            But when these beliefs are taught in science classes I have a huge problem. I also get frustrated when people take the words of the Torah or Gospels literally in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

                            Chris.
                            Also a valid point. Unfortunately, our aversion to Fundamentalism is often deemed as heresy.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by cspanos
                              I tend to agree.

                              But when these beliefs are taught in science classes I have a huge problem. I also get frustrated when people take the words of the Torah or Gospels literally in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary.
                              As you know, Islam and Christianity incorporated our creation story into their own religions - and while it is flattering that they believe the Torah in this regard, it is odd that they demand others believe it too. To us, there is no need for goyim to believe in the creation since G-d neither expects it of you nor judges you based upon your belief in the story. Therefore we have no reason to get you to believe it. So I do not understand your frustration for Christians, Muslims, and Jews believing it, and I do not understand Christian and Islamic frustration at you not believing it. To Jews, good if you believe it, fine if you don't. It would be nice if secularists, Muslims, and Christians had the same attitude.

                              For example, if the Torah stated the Kotel was only 3 metres tall, but you could stand before that wall and see it was clearly much taller, would you assume your eyes were in error?
                              Ha, no danger of that happening since the Torah was given waaay before the Kotel was in existence. But in the interest of furthering the discussion, a common complaint is that the Torah includes a geographical desciption of a tub that would give an incorrect figure for Pi. I posted this once before on the Jewish thead, so I apologize for the repeat post to those who have seen this already:

                              To help you read this, Chris, I'll translate some of the Hebrew:
                              Gematria - Hebraic codes, numerology of sorts
                              Shlomo HaMelech - King Solomon
                              Melachim - Book of Kings (might be book of Chronicles in the Christian bible)
                              Pasuk - verse

                              Gematria of the Week
                              The Vilna Gaon was such a renowned genius, they say he used to study math in the bathroom, when he couldn't learn Torah. He offers a tremendous insight into the work of the wisest man of all time, Shlomo HaMelech. In Melachim there is a record of an iron tub. The wording is "ten cubits from its one lip to its other, circular all around, a thirty cubit line would encircle it all around" (7:23). Anyone with a basic understanding of geometry should recognize the immediate question. If the diameter is 10 cubits, as described, then the circumference should be approximately 31.4 cubits, not just thirty! The other abnormality is the spelling of the word "line". The word is "Kav", which is typically spelled with the two Hebrew letters "Kuf" and "Vav". The text here adds an extra (and silent) "Hay," for no apparent purpose. The Vilna Gaon explains this pasuk to be a code of sorts. He takes the crude value of the ratio of the circumference to diameter in the verse, 30:10 (3/1) and uses it as a key. Next he divides the gematria of the word "Kav" with a "Hay" by the word "Kav" without a "Hay." (The spelling divided by the pronunciation.) This is 111/106. Multiply that by the key, 3, and presto, you have Pi. (Pi is the mathematical constant describing the relationship of the diameter of a circle to its circumference. It approximately equals 3.1415. Mathematicians still do not have a finite value for Pi.) Shlomo HaMelech encrypted the value of Pi into the text, with an accuracy to the ninth decimal place, not to be matched by mathematicians until the time of Isaac Newton (1642-1727)!


                              Pretty cool, eh? And the Christians will appreciate that too since it's in their Bible as well.

                              The actual evidence for the Earth being older than 6000 years is beyond overwhelming. To ignore all of that evidence in the name of faith does a great disservice to one of God's greatest creations - the human mind.

                              Chris.
                              People have tried to disprove the Torah for millennia. And yet people believe. They will always believe.

                              "Hashem - only He is G-d. Hashem - only He is G-d"

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