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    5.6er whoa baby!

    Big earthquake just hit. Ya feel that in the east bay Tuf? Fun one
    Embrace uncertainty. Hard problems rarely have easy solutions. Jonah Lehrer

    #2
    Shaken...not stirred.

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      #3
      lol, actually it was more of a rocking.

      Wasn't on the Hayward fault damn it, that's the one that needs to let some stress off and is way too close to me.
      Embrace uncertainty. Hard problems rarely have easy solutions. Jonah Lehrer

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        #4
        When the Loma Prieta earthquake hit, I was at work. It seemed to last at least 10 seconds. People came running into my office. The first thing I said was, boy, thats got to be a big one. I didn't even notice this one.

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          #5
          Chas I had no idea you were in Cal let alone the Bay Area, I thought you were an East Coaster that's why I said your welcome re CIRM!
          Embrace uncertainty. Hard problems rarely have easy solutions. Jonah Lehrer

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            #6
            Sooner or later, the New Madrid fault is gonna have a big twich or two, and a lotta folks will think it was fun and others not so funny at all, but EVERYONE will be awake for sure. Fortunately Spring-town here is just far enough away that if the really big one hits (like 1811-12) we'll get rocked pretty hard but should still be OK. It's quite sobering (ok, it gives you the willies) to drive across one of the bridges over the Mississippi River, look out over that immense expanse of water and realize it ran the OTHER WAY for three days (or so they say)........and then you hit the gas pedal, the better to get off the bridge quicker

            Tom

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              #7
              Originally posted by Tom
              It's quite sobering (ok, it gives you the willies) to drive across one of the bridges over the Mississippi River, look out over that immense expanse of water and realize it ran the OTHER WAY for three days (or so they say)........and then you hit the gas pedal, the better to get off the bridge quicker

              Tom
              Not to nit-pick, but -
              It's documented that the river flowed backward temporarily, but it can't have done so for three days....

              Still, a hell of a big quake to move that mass of water backward for any time at all. I wouldn't want to be caught in one like it, that's for sure!

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                #8
                Good fun. Biggest in the bay since 89', I think.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Tom
                  Sooner or later, the New Madrid fault is gonna have a big twich or two, and a lotta folks will think it was fun and others not so funny at all, but EVERYONE will be awake for sure. Fortunately Spring-town here is just far enough away that if the really big one hits (like 1811-12) we'll get rocked pretty hard but should still be OK. It's quite sobering (ok, it gives you the willies) to drive across one of the bridges over the Mississippi River, look out over that immense expanse of water and realize it ran the OTHER WAY for three days (or so they say)........and then you hit the gas pedal, the better to get off the bridge quicker

                  Tom
                  You got 100-300 years on that one, we're due anytime!

                  I'm on violent shaking ground re the Hayward and Rodgers creek faults, and very strong shaking for the San Andreas
                  Embrace uncertainty. Hard problems rarely have easy solutions. Jonah Lehrer

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by leschinsky
                    Big earthquake just hit. Ya feel that in the east bay Tuf? Fun one
                    Was sitting down doing some homework at Cal when, I thought one of my friends was messing with my chair. I turned and looked at some of the huge panes of glass, and surely the reflection of the lights of the room in the windows was shaking violently. A couple of us put down what we were doing and kinda looked at eachother like "was that the end of it?" I did notice a lot of folks just walking around without a clue.

                    I did my undergrad work in Geology, so for me, it's nice to shake, rattle and roll once in a while
                    ...

                    I do think the USGS might revise their Richter reading down. But then again, I haven't checked their website yet for the epi.
                    No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Tufelhunden
                      Was sitting down doing some homework at Cal when, I thought one of my friends was messing with my chair. I turned and looked at some of the huge panes of glass, and surely the reflection of the lights of the room in the windows was shaking violently. A couple of us put down what we were doing and kinda looked at eachother like "was that the end of it?" I did notice a lot of folks just walking around without a clue.

                      I did my undergrad work in Geology, so for me, it's nice to shake, rattle and roll once in a while
                      ...

                      I do think the USGS might revise their Richter reading down. But then again, I haven't checked their website yet for the epi.
                      I took three semesters of geology with the somewhat well known George Wheeldon (I even got to take a fledging course in Paleontology with him) at our local college so I can and do relate. George is a volcano freak and has gone up in small planes to view active volcanos and had some hair-raising tales to tell about that activity.

                      http://www.gwheeldon.org/hm_courses_mining.htm
                      "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
                      J.B.S.Haldane

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                        #12
                        That was a really cool Wikipedia article, Leschinsky. Kinda worrisome, tho......so much infrastructure and development at risk. The info and pic of Memorial Stadium on UCal was downright hair raising.

                        Finding info about New Madrid and its potential effects is much harder, but it's predicted that there's a 90% chance of a magnitude 7 on the Richter scale in the next 50 years.......and I've been hearing that one for about 20 years already. So, maybe we got 200 years left before the REALLY big one, but a 7.0 ain't nothing to sneeze at, either.

                        3 major areas that are of concern, or should be if civil authorities are asleep at the wheel, are St. Louis, Cairo, and Memphis. St. Louis and Memphis are both big cities with a lot of old construction that would have a California engineer aghast with fright. Masonry structures, etc......just like San Fran, death traps in case of earthquake.

                        I mentioned bridges in the first post. From St Louis to Greenville MS there are 13 road and 6 rail bridges across the Mississippi, and another RR bridge across the Ohio right at Cairo. Just about all of them would come down in a magnitude 8, and in a magnitude 7 the RR bridges at Memphis (Frisco, Harahan), Cairo (Cairo Ohio R., Thebes) may come down. This would create a HUGE problem for the US economy - the railroads have an extraordinary ability to literally strangle the US economy because they transport so much bulk. I think it was once said that if US RR workers all went on strike, the US GNP would decline something like 1 percent PER DAY. South of Memphis there's only 3 RR bridges (Vicksburg, Baton Rouge, and Huey P Long at New Orleans with 4 tracks total between them. North of St Louis there's more bridges but even so, the South would be in big big trouble - BNSF runs 50 trains a day thru my hometown on the way to Memphis and a lot of them are coal trains from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming, which is where a lot of cities get their electricity in the East. If the earthquake hit in winter it could be a pretty cold winter for a lotta folks and/or there's gonna be some serious sticker shock when people open their electric bills And don't forget about barge traffic (whoops, there goes another half percent of GNP per day!) - each bridge that comes down closes the river right then and there and some of the bigger bridges could take MONTHS just to clear, much less rebuild.

                        Then there's the damage to the farm land from sandblows (from above there are literally millions of them, and they add up to a significant percentage of land), etc. Probably one of the neater things I read about once years ago in a library is the 'Richter Dipstick', a TV transmission tower near MM60.0 on I-55. It seems the subcontractor had not done his homework and built the 700' tower on a sandblow. 300,000# of tower sits on a 12 inch thick concrete pad on top of a sand blow. They didn't realize their mistake until someone saw it from the air The tower's painted red and white in 100 foot sections, and its expected in a magnitude 6.5 or so it'll sink up to the first white section. 7.0 and it'll sink 2 sections. Magnitude 8 - fall over....thus the nickname.
                        Richter Dipstick

                        BTW I've got two cousins in the Bay Area - one in San Jose and the other up in Napa, both of them Kalifornia kids through and through (Matt told me about his first earthquake experience growing up in Redlands "kewl!" "I better go stand in the doorway" then "Kewl!" (again ) ) and no doubt they both felt it as well.

                        Tom

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                          #13
                          Whoa! Hope everybody was okay and nobody lost too much of the fancy china. I lived in the South Bay from '82 to '98 and of course could not forget the loma prieta earthquake of 1989.
                          Daniel

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by Juke_spin
                            I took three semesters of geology with the somewhat well known George Wheeldon (I even got to take a fledging course in Paleontology with him) at our local college so I can and do relate. George is a volcano freak and has gone up in small planes to view active volcanos and had some hair-raising tales to tell about that activity.

                            http://www.gwheeldon.org/hm_courses_mining.htm
                            Wheeldon, eh. I think one of my professors was a classmate of his at Cal State. San Jose, I think.
                            No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

                            Comment


                              #15
                              The epicenter was nine or 10 miles northeast of San Jose. Made for a nice wiggle at my house.

                              I am in West San Leandro; the Hayward fault is basically along 580 in the East San Leandro.

                              The fault that just rumbled runs, basically, from San Jose up through Pleasanton.
                              4/6/97, car accident, C5. http://raccoon-kathleen.blogspot.com/

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