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    Top 10 mystery diseases

    Not much info about the diseases themselves, but that is what Google is for. One I never heard of...Pica. Some scrumptious dirt anyone?

    http://www.livescience.com/humanbiol..._diseases.html
    "So I have stayed as I am, without regret, seperated from the normal human condition." Guy Sajer

    #2
    Heard of pica when I was researching my own anemia. Disgusting eh? I never got that bad thank goodness!
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

    Comment


      #3
      Mike,

      Thanks for posting this. It is very interesting although I disagree with their choices. Some of these diseases are not so mysterious and this web site's choices may simply represent their ignorance. For example, I am not so sure that Avian Flu, the common cold, and AIDS would rank amongst the top ten most "mysterious" diseases. I do agree about Morgellon's disease, Schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's.

      My list would include:

      1. Stiff Man's syndrome. This is a strange disease where a person becomes more rigid as the disease progresses. The cause is unknown although some studies suggest that it may be autoimmunity to inhibitory cells in the central nervous system and related possibly to diabetes.

      2. Multiple sclerosis. Despite many years of study and vague hypotheses that this is an auto-immune disease, neither the causes nor treatments are well understood. For example, it is not clear why interferon and copaxone reduces the frequency and severity of exacerbating attacks.

      3. Diabetes. Most people think that diabetes is a well understood disease where insulin-producing cells in the pancreas degenerate and a person needs to get insulin supplementation. However, diabetes is mysterious autoimmune, vascular, hormonal, and peripheral nervous system disease.

      4. Neurodegenerative diseases. I would include multisystem atrophy, spinal muscular atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's, supranuclear palsy, and Huntington's disease. Although genes associated with some these diseases have been discovered, we don't understand how and why they occur.

      5. Autism. For all the research that is going on about this disease, we know almost nothing about what the lesion is and what causes it.

      6. Schizophrenia. This is a bizarre condition that affects millions upon millions of people and we don't know what causes it.

      7. Manic depression. This is one of the most common conditions that afflict humans. Yet, we don't know what it is. For many years, the only treatment was lithium and we had little idea of what it did.

      8. Lung Cancer. I know, smoking and asbestos cause lung cancer but there has been a recent rash of young people who have died of lung cancer without any obvious risk factor. Dana Reeve died of lung cancer. The 40-some year old sister of a friend died of lung cancer. Neither smoked. What is going on?

      9. Leukemia/Lymphoma. These are the most common cancers in people and animals. While many risk factors have been identified, most cases do not have an identifiable cause or risk factor. There has been a mysterious increase in leukemia in young children over the last 30 years (Source).

      10. Glioma. This is the most common kind of brain tumor and pretty much incurable. Surgery and chemotherapy provide a little time but glioblastomas almost always recur and 5-year survivals from glioblastomas are probably less than 5%. By the way, there has also been a mysterious increase in brain tumors in children in the past 30 years.


      Wise.

      Comment


        #4
        Pica also includes ice eating.

        My theories follow.

        schizophrenia, manic depression and bipolar disorder - infectious agents that affect the cns
        http://psychiatrictimes.com/showArti...leID=189500142
        neurodegenerative diseases and ms - exposure to environmental neurotoxins or viral/bacterial agents
        aids - biomedical terrorism/population control (I know I'm gonna get bashed for this one)
        http://www.duesberg.com/index.html
        lupus - exposure to pristane, a by-product of mineral oil
        http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...?artid=1566261
        Last edited by antiquity; 24 Feb 2007, 12:17 AM.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by antiquity
          Pica also includes ice eating.

          My theories follow.

          schizophrenia, manic depression and bipolar disorder - infectious agents that affect the cns
          http://psychiatrictimes.com/showArti...leID=189500142
          neurodegenerative diseases and ms - exposure to environmental neurotoxins or viral/bacterial agents
          aids - biomedical terrorism/population control (I know I'm gonna get bashed for this one)
          http://www.duesberg.com/index.html
          lupus - exposure to pristane, a by-product of mineral oil
          http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...?artid=1566261
          Oyeve! Antiquity, I worry about your conspiracy theories concerning AIDS. Maybe it is because I don't believe that anybody would be evil enough to do something like that. In the same way, I cannot believe (or perhaps will not) that the 9/11 bombing of the World Trade Center is done in collaboration with a U.S. agency in order to scare the population of the United States to support a war in the Middle East. It is just too deep and dark for me. In fact, I would find it very difficult to live in a country that did such things to itself.

          Regarding pristane, it is very interesting that pristane will cause lupus in mice (Source). It is the only inducible model of autoimmunity associated with the clinical syndrome as well as the characteristic serologic abnormalities of SLE. It is very convincing. Very interestingly, X-linked immunodeficient mice will spontaneously develop a lupus-related anti-RNA helicase A autoantibodies but are resistant to pristane-induced lupus (Source). On the other hand, lupus itself has a myriad of effects that may or may not be associated with autoimmunity. For example, lupus causes a very high incidence of transverse myelitis. In fact, it may be the most common cause of TM except that it is often diagnosed as lupus rather than TM. One of my faculty members has shown that human macrophages collected from patients with lupus lack the ability to phagocytose apoptotic cells and has proposed a very interesting hypothesis, that macrophagic consumption of apoptotic cells is important for preventing bystander injuries. In other words, cells that are undergoing self-immolation are releasing toxic cytokines that damage surrounding cells. Macrophages that detect apoptotic cells can clean them out before they cause inflammatory damage to surrounding cells. In lupus, apparently, this mechanism is not working well and this is one of the reasons for damage to multiple tissues.

          I don't agree with you regarding schizophrenia and manic depression. I don't think that we need to invent infectious or other causes for these diseases. It is amazing that our brains stay in balance given all the programmed emotions and drives that we have, and everything that the brain must do.

          Wise.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Wise Young

            I don't agree with you regarding schizophrenia and manic depression. I don't think that we need to invent infectious or other causes for these diseases. It is amazing that our brains stay in balance given all the programmed emotions and drives that we have, and everything that the brain must do.

            Wise.
            But did you find it interesting that those with schizophrenia tested higher for antibodies to certain infectious agents than the normal population? If these things can affect animal behavior then why not human. It's a plausable cause and one that deserves more attention IMO.

            A variety of infections have been associated with depression and other psychiatric disorders.

            The first microbe to focus our attention in this area was "Treponema pallidum"-the spirochete that causes syphilis. Today, the spirochete that is most likely to be a cause of depression is "Borrelia burgdorferi," the agent of Lyme disease.

            Patients with Lyme disease, for example, may become atypically irritable, agitated, or tearful at the least provocation. In addition, they may experience mood swings that may be misdiagnosed as a bipolar disorder. Viruses, such as HIV & Herpes Simplex, are also well recognized as agents of unusual neuropsychiatric and depressive states.

            In these cases, identification and treatment of the underlying infectious cause is clearly critical to improving the patient's neuropsychiatric disorder.
            http://asp.cumc.columbia.edu/psych/a...uiry.asp?SI=80

            Oyeve! Antiquity, I worry about your conspiracy theories concerning AIDS. Maybe it is because I don't believe that anybody would be evil enough to do something like that.
            Do you think that Duesberg's challenges have any merit? Being a student of history has made me cynical Wise. We certainly aren't above this. cough ** smallpox blankets **cough. Not like it hasn't been done before.
            Last edited by antiquity; 25 Feb 2007, 7:43 PM.

            Comment


              #7
              to never smoke and to die of lung cancer?strange.is possible ....why....?my ant died and she never ever smoked.[lung cancer].

              Comment


                #8
                regarding ice eating humans.....first time when i saw a human [usa citizen ] asking for ice and baiting the damn ice [12 years ago].the global warming.ice tea and alcohol for free if is possible.cruise ships. long hair and short male brain will ask the same menu.watch the storm and....enjoy your meal and ice.
                think more about tips.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by antiquity
                  But did you find it interesting that those with schizophrenia tested higher for antibodies to certain infectious agents than the normal population? If these things can affect animal behavior then why not human. It's a plausable cause and one that deserves more attention IMO.
                  • Antiquity, there is a theory that schizophrenia results from retroviruses (Source). Another theory suggests that it is associated with toxoplasmosi (Source). Finally, there are a lot of speculations about prenatal exposure to herpes, chlamydia,, and other infections. These kinds of speculations have long surrounded almost every unexplained disease (Source). Until there is more cause-effect data, I will treat these as what they really are, highly speculative hypotheses.

                  http://asp.cumc.columbia.edu/psych/a...uiry.asp?SI=80

                  Do you think that Duesberg's challenges have any merit? Being a student of history has made me cynical Wise. We certainly aren't above this. cough ** smallpox blankets **cough. Not like it hasn't been done before.
                  • I reject Duesberg's chemical non-infection hypothesis of AIDS causation for three reasons. First, there is ample evidence that the disease is infectious and spreads through sexual contact. Second, there is strong evidence that anti-viral (specifically anti-retroviral) drugs are beneficial. Third, the virus that causes AIDS has been isolated and it causes the disease in animals and in people.

                  I am not impressed by Duesberg's web site (Source) because it fails to recognize the strong case for HIV-induced AIDS. It is of course possible that not all AIDS result from the HIV virus but this is a far cry from the accusation of a coverup and other nefarious activities of the government and industry. As a scientist, he should criticize the validity of data underlying the HIV theory. However, I think he fails to take into account all the data that supports the HIV theory. In my opinion, the HIV theory is much stronger than the Duesberg hypothesis.

                  In my opinion, Duesberg is irresponsible. Just like South African Thabo Mbeki who refused to believe that HIV causes AIDS and obstructed delivery of life-saving AIDS therapies in South Africa, Duesberg needs to get off his high horse, review the evidence, and understand that his hypothesis is preventing treatment of people and therefore killing people (Source). His offer to infect himself with HIV-AIDS is so bizarre that it raises questions about this man's rationality and sanity (Source).

                  Finally, regarded smallpox blankets, there was some correspondence between Colonel Henry Bouquet and Lord Jeffrey Amherst (Commander of British forces in North America during the French and Indian War 1756-63) concerning such blankets. I don't question that there are evil people in the world and that they sometimes are in the government and military. You can often recognize such people by the attitude that they express, that a segment of the population are not "humans" and should die. However, to suggest that AIDS was created as a bioweapon to cut the population of Africa goes beyond the pale. In some ways, this theory is perhaps as bad as the theory that AIDS is induced by recreational drugs. There is little or no evidence for the theory. More important, it distracts scientists from doing the real work to cure AIDS.

                  I remember taking care of the first cases of AIDS in New York 1979-1980. If you take the time to read about the AIDS virus and how it attacks the white blood cell, you will understand that that this virus is not man-made and that it evolved. It targets specific receptors on macrophages and white blood cells that we didn't even know about in 1979. Little was known about retroviruses at the time, how to isolate and grow them, and even how to characterize them. It is very unlikely that any laboratory created the AIDS virus or even had the capability of isolating the virus in the 1970's. One reason why the virus itself is so resistant to vaccines is because the virus mutates and evolves very rapidly.

                  Wise.
                  Last edited by Wise Young; 25 Feb 2007, 11:40 PM.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Wise Young
                    In my opinion, Duesberg is irresponsible. Just like South African Thabo Mbeki who refused to believe that HIV causes AIDS and obstructed delivery of life-saving AIDS therapies in South Africa, Duesberg needs to get off his high horse, review the evidence, and understand that his hypothesis is preventing treatment of people and therefore killing people.
                    Looks like those 'life saving aids therapies' aren't so life saving.

                    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0406140932.htm

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Regarding young people who have never smoked dying of lung cancer, I can't help wondering if working in an office with a closed ventilation system and a bunch of laser printers could be a culprit. That and many other environmental agents, like chlorine gas in your shower and radon gas in your basement.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by antiquity
                        Looks like those 'life saving aids therapies' aren't so life saving.

                        http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0406140932.htm
                        Antiquity,

                        On the contrary. AZT continues to be life-saving. It reduces the transmission rate from mother to child. If untreated, there is a 25% chance that the child of HIV-infected woman will get the disease. If treated, that chance falls to 2%. There is an increased risk of cancer that is yet undefined because they have not found cancer. They have found evidence of gene damage due to AZT that increases the risk for cancer but the actual risk is not yet known.

                        The HIVNET 012 trial in 1997-1999 showed that a single dose of nevirapine given to the mother at the time of labor and to the baby after delivery roughly halved the rate of HIV transmission. It is cheap and easy the administter. The main concern with its widespread use is that this may result in development of drug resistance. While other drugs are available, they must be given for a period of time before labor and after.

                        The current regimen that is still recommended for preventing maternal to child transmission is AZT plus 3TC and single dose nevirapine. The AZT is taken after 28 weeks of pregnancy. During labor, she takes AXT and 3TC, as well as a single dose of nevirapine. Her baby then receives nevirapine immediately after birth. The mother continues to take AZT and 3TC for seven days longer, to cut the risk of drug resistance even further (Source).

                        So, the question now is whether or not AZT should be removed from the regimen, given the finding of increased gene damage in the baby associated with AZT use. The balancing of risk and benefits is relatively straightforward. A single dose of nevirapine only halves the transmission rate while the AZT plus nevirapine reduces the risk by tenfold. Using nevirapine alone also significantly increases the chances of a nevirapine resistant AIDS virus.

                        If I were making the recommendation, AZT plus nevirapine is still better than nevirapine alone, both for the baby, the mother, and society in general.

                        Wise.

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