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  • Cockroaches to treat MRSA

    If there were cockroaches in my hospital ward I would complain but....

    Tests have found tissue from the brains and nervous systems of the insects can kill off more than 90% of MRSA and E-coli infections without harming human cells.

    Until now, cockroaches have been seen as a health hazard, to be found in dank and dingy hotels.

    But Simon Lee, a postgraduate researcher at the University of Nottingham, says they hold powerful antibiotic properties after discovering nine different molecules in their tissues which are toxic to bacteria.

    He said: "We hope that these molecules could eventually be developed into treatments for E-coli and MRSA infections that are increasingly resistant to current drugs.

    "These new antibiotics could potentially provide alternatives to currently available drugs that may be effective but have serious and unwanted side effects."
    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-st...s-2071708.html

  • #2
    A truly amazing creature, the cockroach. I hope this pans out for people who suffer from resistant bacteria.
    Originally posted by Adrian View Post
    If there were cockroaches in my hospital ward I would complain but....
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    • #3
      Resistant to bacteria and can actually kill off MRSA? No wonder it is believed that the only thing left on this earth after we destroy each other and everything else will be the lowly cockroach.

      Maybe there is a reason for each thing that exists on this earth.

      But how gross. Same goes for leeches.
      Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

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      • #4
        Originally posted by skippy13 View Post
        But how gross. Same goes for leeches.
        Not to mention maggot therapy. I'd rather die and let them have me than try to remain casual knowing ...
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        • #5
          I have a maggot phobia since childhood. (Long story.) My former boss, a pathologist, assured me that medical grade maggots are sterile and that they will only eat dead tissue. Nonetheless...EEWWWWW! I wonder what kind of cockroaches they mean? Down in Houston, everyone got the giant flying ones when it rained a lot-they call 'em tree roaches. The little ones are really gross. My husband told me that a delicacy in Thailand is bot bugs, giant 4" long flying cockroaches that feast on rice. The locals would rip their heads off and suck out the yummy goodness of that predigested rice, as I understood it.

          If cockroaches kill resistant bacteria that would be unusually good behavior for cockroaches!
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          • #6
            my son is severely alergic to them. They cause a deadly asthsma for some people.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by flicka View Post
              Not to mention maggot therapy. I'd rather die and let them have me than try to remain casual knowing ...
              I had a pressure sore treated with maggot therapy. It was extremely effective, speeding up healing, reducing the chances of infection and ensuring that the healing was done to a high standard with no recurrence of tisue breakdown in a sore that would otherwise have probably needed surgery to treat it. I would reccommend it to anyone.

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              • #8
                leeches are also used for tools in skinflap surgery.....they were approved by the FDA in 2004....the ultimate naturopathic intervention

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                • #9
                  An antibody which causes MRSA bacteria to explode rather than divide brings hope for a universal vaccine.

                  MRSA is a highly antibiotic-resistant form of the bacteria Staphylococcus Aureus which kills about 20,000 people in the US alone each year. Although a small number of antibiotics work against MRSA, the bacteria is constantly evolving resistant strains.

                  Edward Schwartz and colleagues at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York have identified an antibody which targets a protein called glucosaminidase (GMD) deep within MRSA that has a key role in breaking down the cell wall, enabling the bacterium to divide.

                  What's more, the protein is genetically identical in all strains, so a vaccine that targets GMD could potentially be universal.
                  Source

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                  • #10
                    I for one have had MRSA a number of times, went septic twice and came back. I am a carrier, I'm coconized in my nasal passages, hmmmmm cockroaches in my nose, I don't think so. But it's informative.

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                    • #11
                      The research has identified up to nine different molecules in the insect tissues that were toxic to bacteria.
                      It is not just MRSA that is a potential targets for molecules from insect brains.

                      Using state-of-the-art analytical tools, Dr Khan and his team are studying the specific properties of the antibacterial molecules. Research is currently underway to test the potency of these molecules against a variety of emerging superbugs such as Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas and Burkholderia.
                      Mr Lee explained why it is unsurprising that insects secrete their own antimicrobials. He said: “Insects often live in unsanitary and unhygienic environments where they encounter many different types of bacteria. It is therefore logical that they have developed ways of protecting themselves against micro-organisms.”
                      A huge proportion of our current drugs have origins in molecules isolated from plants and fungi. Perhaps the next generation of influential as as pennicilin and quinine will be from bugs. Or maybe from crocodiles:
                      https://www.carecure.net/forum/newre...te=1&p=1310974
                      Australian scientists have discovered that crocodiles – as well as boasting a fine set of teeth and a nice line in drowning and subsequently consuming buffalo – have a highly robust immune system capable of seeing off some penicillin-resistant bacteria.
                      Among the nasties which come to grief in the croc’s system are penicillin-mocking Staphylococcus aureus. HIV, too, has a hard time of it, as Adam Britton of Darwin’s Crocodylus Park, explains: “If you take a test tube of HIV and add crocodile serum it will have a greater effect than human serum. It can kill a much greater number of HIV viral organisms.”
                      If you do not want to insert a cockroach up your nose, how do you feel about inhaling a crocodile?

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