Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Baby Albatross Stomach Contents Illustrate Our Pollution of Earth

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    it didn't occur to me that cruise ships would not returne to port with their trash. and yes I wondered why the plastic has not been gathered up by now and recycled. I guess it would have to be a world effort. like several countries having ships made to take on the task of cleaning it up. I often went to the beach early in the morning, and discovered a group of people that would go and clean up what washed ashore. most lived nearer than I, but it became someting I often did to clear my mind. later people who could not pay their fines were to clean up the roadsides and beaches. it was hardly anything compared to what is out at sea. the particulate plastic will be very hard to clean up.

    Comment


      #17
      if it is true that 20% of the plastic garbage in the oceans is put their by cruise ships then 80% is deposited by nincompoops leaving their bottle tops at the beach or tossing their tops and butts on to a city street where it is carried into the ocean by storm drains.public perception of small things not being litter has to improve.peoples attitudes have to improve.the cruise industry should be ashamed of spoiling the beauty they charge people to see.but every human owns a share of blame,so every human is responsible to help repair the damage that has occurred and prevent future damage from occurring.when we see people throw something on the ground we should

      a. tell them about it
      b. try to get them to pick it up
      c. if a and b dont work we should pick it up ourselves

      Comment


        #18
        wise,
        in a perfect world the trash would not be there.maybe we should start a letter campaign to the cruise ship industry,cargo container companies,and exxon mobil to look into cleaning the mess.in my limited first hand knowledge of the problem here on the east coast the biggest contributor to the problem is commercial fishing.their nets and lines(sometimes their lines are 2 inches in diameter and a mile long)litter the surface of the coastal waterways.their jetsam acts as a magnet for other smaller garbage.the only upside is that often fish find these flotillas to be protective habitats from bigger fish.

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by jody View Post
          plastic milk jug ring. turtle swam through it when it was a baby. aside from the plastic soup, the other thing most found in the oceans and on shores is cigarette Debee. the filter material and the packaging. albatross seem to like lighters too. there were pleany of other picks, but we have all seen picks of seals with plastic and fishing line around their necks. the turtle has been floating in my hard drive for a few years now.
          jody, that turtle picture is just one of the grossest pictures that I have seen. Several efforts have been underway for over 2 decades to reduce the plastic garbage in the ocean.

          http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/science...nep/index.html
          Volunteer efforts try to address the issue now, and the Ocean Conservancy says it organizes the largest of these.

          Last year, 400,000 volunteers from more than 100 countries picked up 6.8 million pounds of trash from beaches, preventing it from harming the ocean, said Tom McCann, a spokesman for the group.

          "It's entirely preventable," he said of the problem. "It's something we can solve ourselves."

          McCann said people can prevent trash from ending up in the ocean by making smarter choices about the products they buy.

          Some of the Ocean Conservancy's recommendations include:

          Buy products with smart packaging that doesn't create excess waste.
          Use alternatives to plastic such as cloth grocery bags and reusable bottles.
          Actually, as I read more about it... the main sources of plastic that get into the ocean come from:
          1. plastic litter flushed down the toilet, into storm sewers, and overflow from water treatment plants
          2. garbage dumped by boats and ships into the ocean. In 1975, the National Academy of Science estimated that 14 billion pounds of garbage were being dumped into the ocean every year. That was 35 years ago. The United States is responsible for about a third of this ocean pollution. Even though it has been illegal for ships to dump plastics into the ocean, it has continued.
          3. fishermen leave thousands of miles of driftnets and other gears in the ocean every year.


          The consequences include many animals. For example, the National Marine Mammal Laboratory concluded that plastic is killing up to 40,000 seals a year. Millions of seabirds and sea turtles, countless fish, and others are dying. The Center for Marine Conservation has been coordinating coastal cleanups since 1986, including nationwide campaigns that took place in the United States. The MARPOL treaty of 1988 was an international treaty that forbade the dumping of debris into the ocean. Canada and Mexico joined in the cleanup. In 1993, over 3.1 million pounds of trash was collected. [source]http://www.whoi.edu/science/B/people/kamaral/plasticsarticle.html[/source].

          Comment


            #20
            when we are dumping in 14,000,000,000 lbs a year,removal of 3,100,000 seems like a very small step.but any step in the right direction is a good step.

            Comment


              #21
              Someday I'll learn how to embed videos here at CC. I can embed YouTube videos but that's about it!

              Bob.
              "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle." - Philo of Alexandria

              Comment


                #22
                Bob, great lecture by Capt. Charles Moore. I am aghast by the amount of plastic and other non-degrading junk I am personally discarding every day. In the last two days alone, I have found myself about to discard plastic bags, plastic bottles, plastic boxes, plastic utensils, etc. In the laboratory, all the chemicals and containers are plastic and disposable, including pipette tips and culture dishes. We need a factory to process all this stuff into synthetic blankets.

                Wise.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
                  Jody, that turtle picture is just one of the grossest pictures that I have seen. Several efforts have been underway for over 2 decades to reduce the plastic garbage in the ocean.

                  http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/science...nep/index.html


                  Actually, as I read more about it... the main sources of plastic that get into the ocean come from:
                  1. plastic litter flushed down the toilet, into storm sewers, and overflow from water treatment plants
                  2. garbage dumped by boats and ships into the ocean. In 1975, the National Academy of Science estimated that 14 billion pounds of garbage were being dumped into the ocean every year. That was 35 years ago. The United States is responsible for about a third of this ocean pollution. Even though it has been illegal for ships to dump plastics into the ocean, it has continued.
                  3. fishermen leave thousands of miles of drift nets and other gears in the ocean every year.


                  The consequences include many animals. For example, the National Marine Mammal Laboratory concluded that plastic is killing up to 40,000 seals a year. Millions of seabirds and sea turtles, countless fish, and others are dying. The Center for Marine Conservation has been coordinating coastal cleanups since 1986, including nationwide campaigns that took place in the United States. The MARPOL treaty of 1988 was an international treaty that forbade the dumping of debris into the ocean. Canada and Mexico joined in the cleanup. In 1993, over 3.1 million pounds of trash was collected. [source]http://www.whoi.edu/science/B/people/kamaral/plasticsarticle.html[/source].
                  sorry Dr young,
                  I could not resist. I have a special love for turtles tortoises frogs and toads. My sister was involved with the San Diego zoo at one time to rehab California tortoises and confiscated Asian terrapin. that is how I became interested. the frog and toad extinction rate is very disturbing over the last decade. hundreds of species are gone. Due to the clear cutting of jungle and forest though, ten new species have been discovered in the last two years, only to be nearly wiped out by citrid fungus. a fungus that they can no longer fight off. polution is suspected to be the cause. I was looking at google earth and wow, canada is the only place in the world with very larg virgin forest. the rest is just small patches here and there all over the planet. I am very glad to learn that some clean up being attempted in the oceans. now if only we can stop eating whale and blue fin tuna for a decade or two.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    via YouTube:

                    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      good awareness video.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        For some reason I can not see the youtube videos anymore just a big white box with a tiny little picture in the corner?

                        This is the first time I have looked in this thread. I think it is the saddest thing I have seen in a while Definitely makes me consider all those water botles I buy bc it is more convenient for the kids sports. No more...
                        If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


                        Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Who to point fingers at ?

                          Story of Stuff; How Things Work, About Stuff

                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLBE5QAYXp8
                          get busy living or get busy dying

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
                            The following picture is a baby albatross that had died and photographed on Midway Atoll, thousands of miles from any human habitation. Fed things that their parents thought may be edible, these baby albatrosses died from the pollution that we dump into the ocean.

                            http://www.chrisjordan.com/current_set2.php?id=11
                            Dr. Young, that is just terrible. I know when Oprah did a special on the pollution in the ocean, it deeply saddened me as well.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by quadvet View Post
                              Who to point fingers at ?

                              Story of Stuff; How Things Work, About Stuff

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLBE5QAYXp8
                              Ahh, my wife asks me why I still have every one of my old Macs from day 1. Well, not every one, but a lot of them. I wish that I could say that I knew deep in my liver that someday my Macs would end up in the Pacific gyre and that would make me really sad. That is why I kept them.

                              Seriously, however, the stuff that I threw out, like my old computers, cell phones, stereos, cameras, batteries, refridgerators, and even CD's cannot compare the plastic wrappings that come around with the stuff that we buy. This is particularly true with food and other disposables.

                              Since starting this thread, I have been counting the number of plastic objects that I throw away. It is shocking. Everything is wrapped in plastic. I buy underwear, it is wrapped in plastic. I get a salad, it is in a plastic container with a top. The salad dressing is in a smaller container with its own cap and there is a plastic fork and the whole thing is put into a plastic bag.

                              Suppose that I throw at least 10 plastic items away every day. If I am average for about a billion people that live in the developed world and use a lot of plastic, a little arithmetic indicates that over 10 billion plastic items are thrown away every day. That is over 3.6 trilion plastic items thrown away per year.

                              If each item weigh 10 grams, that equals 36 billion kilograms of plastic per year. Let us suppose further that the plastic weighs about 1 kg per liter. If so, this means that every year, we throw enough plastic way to occupy 36 billion liters of space. That is approximately equal to 30 million football fields of plastic trash that is about 4 inches (10 cm) thick. So, plastic trash as far as the eye can see and the brain can imagine. And that is just for one year. Imagine this going on for a hundred years.

                              Wise.
                              Last edited by Wise Young; 14 Mar 2010, 2:07 PM.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Sad. I'm responsible for that plastic.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X