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Year's Biggest Full Moon Friday Night

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Hunker View Post
    I am Ccacer so I will get so laid

    the other planet is called Orpheus
    Han: "We are all ready to win, just as we are born knowing only life. It is defeat that you must learn to prepare for"

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    • #17
      Was cloudy here last night. The sky was still lite up though. I could see the deer at the feeder real good. Tonight should be clear so I'm hoping for better show.
      oh well

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      • #18
        Last night's moon was not just the biggest this year:

        http://www.newscientist.com/article/...ef=online-news

        The full Moon will loom larger in the sky on Friday than it has since 1993, as it will be nearly as close as it ever comes to Earth in its orbit.
        And it will be a while before it comes this close again:

        It will be eight years before the Moon appears so big again. "This evening's Moon is not only the largest for 2008 but also during the period 1993-2016,"

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        • #19
          Originally posted by jhope View Post
          the moon is moving away from earth [forgot number but it is like 1cm/year

          the moon stabilizes the earth's axis, without it the axis would move 90 degrees back and forth creating drastic climate changes.

          the moon dictates millions of living things growth and activity as well as climate.

          without the moon life as we know it wouldn't exist.

          i watch discovery science channel. i am starting to fall in love with science again and teach my 6 yr old, and twin 4 year olds. maybe i can make them into little wise youngs? lol
          Jhope, that is great. I am so glad that you are falling in love with science. Kids love science because it is fun.

          Wise.

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          • #20
            without moon we will be dead .strange no?

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            • #21
              Have been feeling down so was unable to check it out. Nick did say that it was cloudy here last night and that he didn't get to see it either.

              When I was in my science class and the subject was the planets and such, I fell in love. Not only is the view awesome and breathtaking but also it makes me see how small I am in this universe. It was so interesting and still is to learn and see the things surrounding us. Thank you jHope for posting and sharing with us.

              Raven
              Have courage for the great sorrows of life and patience for the small ones; and when you have laboriously accomplished your daily task, go to sleep in peace. ~Victor Hugo~

              A warrior is not one who always wins,
              but one who keeps on fighting to the end ~ Unknown ~

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
                ...I believe that it is because the earth's atmosphere has a magnifying effect on the moon when it is close to the horizon. My friend, a physicist, thinks that it is all relative and just a perceptual trick that my brain is playing.

                Wise.
                I can see the argument you are considering Wise. When objects are on the horizon, we can look thru something like 100 miles of denser atmosphere, which is made up of moisture. When it's high overhead, we're looking through only 10 - 20 miles of atmosphere (actually goes higher, but 50% of the atmosphere is below 18,000 feet).

                So you would think that the extra moisture would cause the magnifying effect much like how a spoon looks bigger in a glass of water.

                I think the pencil eraser trick should answer the question though. If the thicker atmosphere near the horizon does magnify the moon, then the eraser should appear smaller at arms length. When the moon nears high up in the sky, the eraser should appear bigger.

                Think I'm gunna try that out!
                .
                "If ya don't have it in the hips, ya better have it in the lips..." ~ Charlie - Villa Dulce

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Rrrrronnn View Post
                  I can see the argument you are considering Wise. When objects are on the horizon, we can look thru something like 100 miles of denser atmosphere, which is made up of moisture. When it's high overhead, we're looking through only 10 - 20 miles of atmosphere (actually goes higher, but 50% of the atmosphere is below 18,000 feet).

                  So you would think that the extra moisture would cause the magnifying effect much like how a spoon looks bigger in a glass of water.

                  I think the pencil eraser trick should answer the question though. If the thicker atmosphere near the horizon does magnify the moon, then the eraser should appear smaller at arms length. When the moon nears high up in the sky, the eraser should appear bigger.

                  Think I'm gunna try that out!
                  Rrrrrron, there is certainly a lot of debate on the subject.
                  http://www.straightdope.com/columns/...ar-the-horizon

                  Here was my reasoning...


                  When the moon is close to the horizon, the light from the bottom of the moon is hitting the atmosphere at a greater angle close to horizon, than the top. When this happens, the light is refracted more, like all lenses, as shown in the attached:

                  I don't know. if we consider the atmosphere a magnifying glass, in the same way that convex lens in the above picture is a magnifying glass. Light coming from an object that hits the earth directly at 90% to the atmosphere surface will not be refracted at all. However, light coming in closer to the lens edge will be refracted so that it focuses to a point.

                  One would imagine that this problem would have been definitively measured and solved by now. By the way, it would be far more accurate just taking your digital camera and taking a picture of the moon when it is on the horizon and when it is up in the sky.

                  Wise.
                  Last edited by Wise Young; 12-15-2008, 08:20 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Not related as such but, Leonardo da Vinci found painting ways to cheat on perspective projection (quite interesting); Link.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
                      Rrrrrron, there is certainly a lot of debate on the subject.
                      http://www.straightdope.com/columns/...ar-the-horizon

                      Here was my reasoning...


                      When the moon is close to the horizon, the light from the bottom of the moon is hitting the atmosphere at a greater angle close to horizon, than the top. When this happens, the light is refracted more, like all lenses, as shown in the attached:

                      I don't know. if we consider the atmosphere a magnifying glass, in the same way that convex lens in the above picture is a magnifying glass. Light coming from an object that hits the earth directly at 90% to the atmosphere surface will not be refracted at all. However, light coming in closer to the lens edge will be refracted so that it focuses to a point.

                      One would imagine that this problem would have been definitively measured and solved by now. By the way, it would be far more accurate just taking your digital camera and taking a picture of the moon when it is on the horizon and when it is up in the sky.

                      Wise.
                      Dr. Wise, I think I am going to have to side with your physicist colleague. I would side with you if the sun was warmest at sunrise and sunset and not at its hottest during the summer when it is directly overhead.
                      No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Tufelhunden View Post
                        Dr. Wise, I think I am going to have to side with your physicist colleague. I would side with you if the sun was warmest at sunrise and sunset and not at its hottest during the summer when it is directly overhead.
                        LOL, sigh. Intensity of sun-rays is related to how much atmosphere they pass through before getting to you. When the sun is directly overhead, it passes through a lot less atmosphere. Wise.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
                          LOL, sigh. Intensity of sun-rays is related to how much atmosphere they pass through before getting to you. When the sun is directly overhead, it passes through a lot less atmosphere. Wise.
                          Good point, lol.
                          No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

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