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'People in wheelchairs should be able to fly'

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  • 'People in wheelchairs should be able to fly'

    I wish all airports had an Eagle Lift. It is so much safer than having to depend on a couple people doing transfers.

    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/disa...144206481.html
    Last edited by HACKNSACK44; 05-14-2019, 09:32 PM.

  • #2
    That thing does look like it would be friendly, and would be great if airports had one, but man I can't imagine wanting to travel/pack one with me.

    Sorry, but your title made me remember this and had to post it.

    http://i.imgur.com/fySpEWa.gifv
    "a T10, who'd Rather be ridin'; than rollin'"

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    • #3
      Eagle lift

      Originally posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
      I wish all airports had an Eagle Lift. It is so much safer than having to depend on a couple people doing transfers.

      https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/disa...144206481.html
      West Jet uses these lifts. I find they are a P. in the A.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Yadier View Post
        West Jet uses these lifts. I find they are a P. in the A.
        I was intrigued by the original story. I'd never heard of the Eagle Lift before.

        We don't travel much but the most nerve-racking part of the journey is that two person lift-transfer from his wheelchair down to to the aisle chair followed by the 2 person lift to the seat. Only to repeat once we've landed.

        I'm always eyeing the contract employees for their muscle bulk and whether they seem like they've done a 2 person transfer before.

        What didn't you like about the Eagle lift?

        (Not that I think US carriers are going to adopt and invest in this. The contract employees make 12.50/hr and the airline has no liability.)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Yadier View Post
          West Jet uses these lifts. I find they are a P. in the A.
          Why don't you like the lift? What is your injury level? I'm around 250 pounds c3c4 and it is very hard to put my trust into a couple of people who really don't care about me. Also the Fire Chief at one of the airports said they would rather use the lift because it is safer for everyone. He said the transfers are awkward and can go bad quickly.

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          • #6
            List of airports that have a Eagle Lift.
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Originally posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
              List of airports that have a Eagle Lift.
              Thanks!

              The US distributor for the Eagle lift seems to be Diamond Passenger Lift.
              https://diamondpassengerlift.com
              https://www.facebook.com/DPLEagle2USA/

              I'm hoping they may have some updated information since their 2016 listings.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 2drwhofans View Post
                Thanks!

                The US distributor for the Eagle lift seems to be Diamond Passenger Lift.
                https://diamondpassengerlift.com
                https://www.facebook.com/DPLEagle2USA/

                I'm hoping they may have some updated information since their 2016 listings.
                Thanks for the info! This company is about 1hr 30mins from me. Like you said hopefully they have an updated list.

                Comment


                • #9
                  And then I found this:

                  https://quadcapable.com/airline-trav...-quadriplegic/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 2drwhofans View Post
                    This is so ridiculous! The cost of training people is to much? I know the Fire Chief at the Orlando airport knows how to use it so have him train these people. Lets be real it's not rocket science! Also you think the so called training is expensive what if the muscle drops someone and causes serious injuries or one of them throw their back out. You don't think that will cost a pretty penny? From the Orlando Fire Chief they would rather use the lift because it is safer for everyone. He said the transfers are awkward and can go bad quickly.

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                    • #11
                      It took OSHA and NIOSH involvement to get hospitals and nursing homes in the USA to start implementing safe patient handling and movement techniques, replacing dangerous (for both nurses and patients) manual lifting with the use of mechanical lifts and and other devices in most USA hospitals. I was part of the national effort to get this implemented into rehabilitation centers and clinics (a joint effort of the Assoc. of Rehabilitation Nurses and the the American Physical Therapy Assoc.). Building a business case for this based on huge injured worker costs, plus loss of experienced and highly qualified nursing and therapy staff to career-ending injuries was an important part of this change, in spite of hospitals fighting these efforts due to "excessive costs".

                      In the project I worked on at my hospital, we installed ceiling track lifts on my unit as a demonstration project (cost $200,000), and were able to show a savings in injured worker costs of over $500,000 in less than 6 months. The rest of the hospital was similarly equipped over the next 5 years.

                      I'll bet that many of these workers who do this lifting at airports are unionized...their union needs to get behind this effort and join together with travelers with mobility impairments to push the airlines and airports.

                      (KLD)
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                        It took OSHA and NIOSH involvement to get hospitals and nursing homes in the USA to start implementing safe patient handling and movement techniques, replacing dangerous (for both nurses and patients) manual lifting with the use of mechanical lifts and and other devices in most USA hospitals. I was part of the national effort to get this implemented into rehabilitation centers and clinics (a joint effort of the Assoc. of Rehabilitation Nurses and the the American Physical Therapy Assoc.). Building a business case for this based on huge injured worker costs, plus loss of experienced and highly qualified nursing and therapy staff to career-ending injuries was an important part of this change, in spite of hospitals fighting these efforts due to "excessive costs".

                        In the project I worked on at my hospital, we installed ceiling track lifts on my unit as a demonstration project (cost $200,000), and were able to show a savings in injured worker costs of over $500,000 in less than 6 months. The rest of the hospital was similarly equipped over the next 5 years.

                        I'll bet that many of these workers who do this lifting at airports are unionized...their union needs to get behind this effort and join together with travelers with mobility impairments to push the airlines and airports.

                        (KLD)
                        That is pretty cool. I can't believe people haven't got hurt doing transfers at airports.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Remember there are two sides to every story. I deal with people wanting and needing to fly all the time.

                          Alot of people in our community dont want to stand out or cause a big fuss.

                          My Wife and I have been flying for 21 years many times flying several times a month.

                          Have never been hurt, dropped, or in pain from being lifted.

                          Its fast, simple and effortless. Now there are times airline people think the know how to lift me better then I know myself and body.

                          Just like anything else in our life we need to speak up and be our own advocate explain how you need and want to be lifted.

                          If someone is more heavy then you may need more help.

                          But for me I dont want a big production and a lot of attention.

                          Side note...just because one has a lift dont be lead in to a false sense of security.

                          Cant tell you how many times we have gotten on a bus or shuttle and had to show the driver how to use the lift control.

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                          • #14
                            Leaving for Mexico Thursday and at least two legs of four will be on regional jets.
                            Nervous.

                            I have good arm and shoulder strength (no core), but I've heard they often manhandle you up the stairs at airports without jetways. I've also heard they will sometimes use the food loading equipment to get a wheelchair user into the plane. We shall see.
                            T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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