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My first flight post-injury

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  • #31
    I have mixed feelings on the Eagle Lift. Negatives IMO: quite time consuming (I'd almost prefer the quick lift and your done routine...and this coming from someone who still has battle scars from lifts gone bad...thanks United). This video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlaIjvx1-OQ almost reminds me of the "how many people does it take to change a lightbulb" question. How does this device navigate the threshold between plane/jetway?

    Pros IMO: I'm 6'4, 185 lbs of dead weight. Often assisted by staff who physically are no match for that transfer of weight. This would alleviate that. would it be possible to sit in a window seat with this device? That would be a big + in my opinion. In the link I posted, the passenger is being seated in what looks like a business class seat. When I earn enough reward miles for long flights I prefer such seats, but given the configuration, a standard 2-man lift is even more difficult. This would help it seems.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by landrover View Post
      I have mixed feelings on the Eagle Lift. Negatives IMO: quite time consuming (I'd almost prefer the quick lift and your done routine...and this coming from someone who still has battle scars from lifts gone bad...thanks United). This video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlaIjvx1-OQ almost reminds me of the "how many people does it take to change a lightbulb" question. How does this device navigate the threshold between plane/jetway?

      Pros IMO: I'm 6'4, 185 lbs of dead weight. Often assisted by staff who physically are no match for that transfer of weight. This would alleviate that. would it be possible to sit in a window seat with this device? That would be a big + in my opinion. In the link I posted, the passenger is being seated in what looks like a business class seat. When I earn enough reward miles for long flights I prefer such seats, but given the configuration, a standard 2-man lift is even more difficult. This would help it seems.
      If they were to train the people that would be using the lift you wouldn't have so many people standing around and it would be quicker. The way it looked in the video they could put you in any seat.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
        If they were to train the people that would be using the lift you wouldn't have so many people standing around and it would be quicker. The way it looked in the video they could put you in any seat.
        You can youtube a bunch of videos now using the lift and they are all pretty much the same.

        For me Ill keep the original way with 2 attendants once I am loaded on to the plane it takes less then a minute tops.

        Fast, simple and less intrusive...

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        • #34

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          • #35

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            • #36
              What is your injury again? How much do you way? I'm a 230 pound c3c4 quad with no balance. It's hard to trust people that don't even know me to transfer me into the aisle chair then into the plane seat.

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              • #37
                When I fly I try and get seat 1B or 1C, I can usually get my chair to those seats and transfer w/o an aisle chair. Caveats:

                - I am a T8 para w/ good transferring skills
                - My chair is 16 inches wide (TiLite TR3 w/ 4 degree camber) and I scrape the sides so that is pretty much as wide as you can get.
                - I fly delta pretty much exclusively.
                - I can afford to spend the extra dollars to fly business class.

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                • #38
                  Just about any commercial plane (except regional jets and smaller) has first row isle seats that you can get close enough to transfer with a 24" wide wheelchair (16" seat width + 8" for the wheels) and zero camber. The transfer isn't easy. It would get increasingly more difficult with increasing camber. Who needs camber anyways? Cool looking. But pretty much useless off the court.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by August West View Post
                    Just about any commercial plane (except regional jets and smaller) has first row isle seats that you can get close enough to transfer with a 24" wide wheelchair (16" seat width + 8" for the wheels) and zero camber. The transfer isn't easy. It would get increasingly more difficult with increasing camber. Who needs camber anyways? Cool looking. But pretty much useless off the court.
                    Unfortunately my Quickie 646SE is 25.75in wide. So I have to use the aisle chair.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
                      Unfortunately my Quickie 646SE is 25.75in wide. So I have to use the aisle chair.
                      Unfortunately I haven't been on a plane yet where my chair would have been able to navigate the gap between the jetway and plane door. Either there is a gap, or a substantial height difference that a power chair couldn't navigate. That's a question I have with the Eagle lift...can it go over the gap, or would you have to load once inside the plane?

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                      • #41
                        SCI-Nurse. My husband is going on a trip with our card club of 10 other people and I. This is his first flight post surgery/post not able to walk. All of this is with Princess Cruiselines. We are flying Delta. We fly to Minneapolis and switch planes. Then fly to Fairbanks, Alaska. Coming home, we are flying with American and have to switch planes again in Dallas and then home to Omaha, NE.

                        Our group is also taking a bus to a hotel and a train to Denali Wilderness Lodge.

                        My husband will be sitting in his wheelchair on our cruise ship. Should we just use our "Breezy" wheelchair or should I look into a transport wheelchair. I am assuming our "Breezy" would be much more comfortable than a transport wheelchair even though
                        they are not as heavy.

                        So much to think about. I already planned on packing one large suitcase with chucks, wipes, gloves, briefs, bandages, etc.

                        I bought a bag to carry our transfer board. I purchased a bedrail that breaks down.

                        Any ideas and help would be much appreciated.

                        Thank you.

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                        • #42
                          What chair does he use on a regular basis? A "Breezy"?? He should take the chair he is used to using. Is he only wheelchair mobile, or does he also stand/walk? I never recommend a transport chair. He would be unable to move himself in a transport chair, even to turn the chair around to look in a different direction. Also, transport chairs are notoriously difficult to get up over curbs or even thresholds around the ship, and they are murder on cobblestones or unpaved surfaces ashore.

                          Is he able to walk up the steps of a bus?

                          Do you have a wheelchair accessible cabin? Hotel? What are your plans for showers/bathing?

                          Do you really need a bed rail? We never used one. I would park my mother's wheelchair right next to the bed so she could use it from assistance in turns and to prevent her leg from falling off the side of the bed in heavy seas.

                          Definitely should gate check his wheelchair and when changing planes, have the chair brought up to the plane door, then use that to get to the next flight. The airlines can arrange for a "pusher" if needed.

                          You can check your bag with the medical supplies at no extra cost, but frankly, I would take that and the slide board on as part of your carry-on luggage. If you limit what is inside the bag to only those items, it does not count against your carry-on limit. It would be a disaster if those bags got lost.

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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