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Delta Airlines New Rules on Traveling with Service and Comfort Animals

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    #16
    Originally posted by vjls View Post
    dog have no idea how my wheelchair cushion and cover was soaked to pint of dripping it was in the cargo hold where my chair was I have a real problem with these so called dogs not a service dog the fakers wantabee

    punctuation is your friend..... I promise you.....

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      #17
      I am sure the airlines are having a rough time of it and are caught in the middle and according to this article
      http://money.cnn.com/2018/01/19/news...als/index.html

      "Under current policy, Delta, along with United Continental(UAL) and American Airlines(AAL), requires passengers to submit proof from a health professional 48 hours in advance that a service animal needs to fly with its owner."

      It seems to me that the above requirement for Service Animals will make it harder for people with Service Animals and may already be in violation of the ACAA. It does not say anything about when the documentation has to be acquired. Can this documentation be 10 years old? The devil is in the details....

      It does not seem like a good situation for anyone....



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        #18
        Originally posted by djrolling View Post
        I am sure the airlines are having a rough time of it and are caught in the middle and according to this article
        http://money.cnn.com/2018/01/19/news...als/index.html

        "Under current policy, Delta, along with United Continental(UAL) and American Airlines(AAL), requires passengers to submit proof from a health professional 48 hours in advance that a service animal needs to fly with its owner."

        It seems to me that the above requirement for Service Animals will make it harder for people with Service Animals and may already be in violation of the ACAA. It does not say anything about when the documentation has to be acquired. Can this documentation be 10 years old? The devil is in the details....

        It does not seem like a good situation for anyone....



        This CNN piece sounds like another story in which the writer has no idea of the difference between service, therapy, emotional or comfort dog. I'm happy to say that we've flown 4 times this year on two different airlines with a service dog and have not had to provide any kind of proof. I mean it really doesn't take a genius to see that the people that use a service dog have a physical disability. I'm not worried about our next flight. I really think Delta is pushing the issue to define a few nagging problems in the ACAA. One, animal=dog just like how it is defined in ADA. Two, creating some requirement for the emotional/companion dog crowd with hidden disabilities or just straight up BS.

        I've sent an email to the organization that my daughter got her service dog from asking if they have looked into these new guidelines proposed by Delta (with American to follow). They know more about this stuff than me ha

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          #19
          Originally posted by Domosoyo View Post
          This CNN piece sounds like another story in which the writer has no idea of the difference between service, therapy, emotional or comfort dog. I'm happy to say that we've flown 4 times this year on two different airlines with a service dog and have not had to provide any kind of proof. I mean it really doesn't take a genius to see that the people that use a service dog have a physical disability. I'm not worried about our next flight. I really think Delta is pushing the issue to define a few nagging problems in the ACAA. One, animal=dog just like how it is defined in ADA. Two, creating some requirement for the emotional/companion dog crowd with hidden disabilities or just straight up BS.

          I've sent an email to the organization that my daughter got her service dog from asking if they have looked into these new guidelines proposed by Delta (with American to follow). They know more about this stuff than me ha
          As I am understanding the Delta requirement as it was reported, Erin would have to provide (by uploading documents to Delta, 48 hours in advance of her flight) documentation of her dog's veterinary health or vaccination records. The dog's veterinarian needs to fill out and sign a from, available on line from Delta. Erin should then carry the completed form with her when she flies. Whether that changes between now and the time she flies home in May, is anyone's guess.

          It will be good to hear the feedback from the organization that trained Erin's dog.

          Here is the Delta policy as seen on the web page. https://www.delta.com/content/www/en...e-animals.html
          Attached Files
          Last edited by gjnl; 22 Jan 2018, 8:37 PM.

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            #20
            Delta Airline Forms to be uploaded to Delta, 48 hours in advance of flight.

            Passenger traveling with a trained service animal: Veterinary Health Form at https://www.delta.com/content/dam/de...uiredForms.pdf
            This form must be completed by a veterinarian professional and requires Customer's Name, date of the last Rabies Vaccine, date of the last Distemper Vaccine, Animal', License number, Date of License issued, State where license issued, Name of the Veterinarian practice, phone number, printed name of the Veterinarian and his/her signature.

            Passenger traveling with an Emotional Support/Psychiatric Service Animal: https://www.delta.com/content/dam/de...uiredForms.pdf
            There are three forms: (1) Veterinary Health Form (as above), (2) Medical/Mental Health Professional Form (certification from a Medical/Mental Health professional that the customers has a mental health related disability that is listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders), and (3) Confirmation of Animal Training Form that is filled out by and signed by the customer/owner of animal, affirming that the animal has been trained to behave in a public setting and takes direction upon command, and recognizing that if the animal acts inappropriately that it will not be considered acceptable or air travel and be denied boarding or will be removed from the aircraft.

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              #21
              Thanks! Yeah it will be interesting to hear back from the service dog organization. They usually do send emails to everyone when there are changes

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                #22
                Originally posted by gjnl View Post
                Delta Airline Forms to be uploaded to Delta, 48 hours in advance of flight.

                Passenger traveling with a trained service animal: Veterinary Health Form at https://www.delta.com/content/dam/de...uiredForms.pdf
                This form must be completed by a veterinarian professional and requires Customer's Name, date of the last Rabies Vaccine, date of the last Distemper Vaccine, Animal', License number, Date of License issued, State where license issued, Name of the Veterinarian practice, phone number, printed name of the Veterinarian and his/her signature.
                Other than the fact that it might be horribly inconvenient to obtain said documentation with in 48 hrs of traveling, I don't see this violating anything explicitly stated in the ADA.


                Originally posted by gjnl View Post
                It doesn't say that a public entity cannot ask for documentation of the animal's health or vaccination records.

                I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing to require, but where/how is the line drawn for where/when documentation of this nature is required and by whom? Can an airline arbitrarily decide to require it or anything else they decide upon? I don't have to show anything but my dog's license and rabies tags (I think) if I were approached in public by an Animal Control officer. Does Delta now have more authority than law enforcement? What other requirements can they dictate in order to keep things up to their standards without any sort of legislation behind it?

                Is this creating an additional hoop intended to discourage people with fraudulent service and/or support animals from flying with them? I hope so. But does it create some unnecessary and unfounded scrutiny for people with legitimate service animals (and otherwise abiding by the law), in my opinion, absolutely! I'm sure (or at least would like to give them the benefit of the doubt) that Delta's intentions in this are not to ultimately infringe upon our civil liberties in any way - I get what they're trying to do, but I don't they're going about it in the "right" way. Like i said, I'm in favor of [slightly] tighter regulations, but it needs to be written into law and enforced across the board... not just randomly declared by an airline... ya know, the whole equality thing....

                *************************************************************
                *** c4/c5 incomplete *** Injured in Summer 2003 ***
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                  #23
                  Originally posted by daveh0 View Post
                  Other than the fact that it might be horribly inconvenient to obtain said documentation with in 48 hrs of traveling, I don't see this violating anything explicitly stated in the ADA.





                  I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing to require, but where/how is the line drawn for where/when documentation of this nature is required and by whom? Can an airline arbitrarily decide to require it or anything else they decide upon? I don't have to show anything but my dog's license and rabies tags (I think) if I were approached in public by an Animal Control officer. Does Delta now have more authority than law enforcement? What other requirements can they dictate in order to keep things up to their standards without any sort of legislation behind it?

                  Is this creating an additional hoop intended to discourage people with fraudulent service and/or support animals from flying with them? I hope so. But does it create some unnecessary and unfounded scrutiny for people with legitimate service animals (and otherwise abiding by the law), in my opinion, absolutely! I'm sure (or at least would like to give them the benefit of the doubt) that Delta's intentions in this are not to ultimately infringe upon our civil liberties in any way - I get what they're trying to do, but I don't they're going about it in the "right" way. Like i said, I'm in favor of [slightly] tighter regulations, but it needs to be written into law and enforced across the board... not just randomly declared by an airline... ya know, the whole equality thing....
                  It will be interesting to see how these requirements hold up and if there are challenges in the courts, won't it?

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Delta's additional policies about flying with service dogs is on their website. It looks like they will not require a very recent health certificate, as they had stated previously, and you will also be able to do on-line or curbside check-in rather than having to wait at the airline desk. The biggest burden is on emotional support/psychiatric support animals which is where the biggest problems seem to be. My daughter slips her service dog's shot records in the dog's pack as well as a copy of the ADA guidelines for service dogs so that is no change for her. One additional checkin at the airport (or online; for service animals only) is all so I'm pretty satisfied with this change. As always, check all of this out before you fly with a call a couple days before you leave with the airlines.

                    https://news.delta.com/updated-requi...upport-animals

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                      #25
                      Update:

                      We just flew from Phoenix to Minneapolis on Delta with a service dog. The change in policy for service, companion and support dogs by Delta, United and American (probably all at this point) has made a huge impact in dogs at the airport. Last year the terminal was full of dogs, the pet relief area was crowded and our flight had six dogs on it. This year we saw no other dogs at the airport. From a service dog perspective we saw very little difference in our airport procedure. We just filled out a little online verification, received a confirmation number and that was it. The only snag was that the confirmation number was not attached to our ticket so the ticket agent gave us a little grief about not seeing a service dog on our tickets. Luckily we were able to give her the confirmation number. Even if we didn't have the confirmation number they are supposed to be able to add a service dog to a ticket on the spot. I would not advise that. My daughter added her service dog about three weeks before the flight. She will be contacting Delta to let them know that part of their online process broke on her.

                      My daughter was very happy about the impact the new guidelines have had. The biggest abuses we noticed over the last few years were the emotional, companion and support animals. She has had unruly dogs charge her service dog, we've seen puppies with service jackets on, un-neutered pit bulls....and really, just too many abuses to list at airports. Those are the very dogs that are most affected by the new guidelines. Many more hoops to jump though vs. service dogs as well they should. Service dog status is reserved for persons with profound disabilities. They don't need more barriers.

                      It will be interesting to see how long these new guidelines make a difference before the fakers come up with their new game plan. Just purchasing a jacket online isn't going to cut it anymore.

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