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    #16
    I have emailed one of my Senators to request sponsorship of Sen. Baldwin's bill. I will add that an option I'd like to see is on-board stowage of any wheelchair, rather than treating it like "luggage" and stowing it in a compartment beneath the plane. How many pieces of luggage cost upwards of $2,000? Why do you think luggage companies advertise the punishment their luggage can tolerate when you travel by air?

    If the wheelchair could be stowed empty in a separate area of the passenger compartment, probably the size of two seats, with some kind of "cage" device over the whole chair and locked in place, or even in a separate "room", that solution would prevent movement or damage of parts. Some chair-users would want to remain in their chairs, others would not.
    I definitely feel further research on this is needed, so that one day air travel will be so much easier for persons with a disability.

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      #17
      A "what came first the chicken or the egg" conundrum. Would wheelchair manufacturers be challenged to make better, safer wheelchairs for travel if wheelchair users stayed in their chairs in flight.

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        #18
        Originally posted by triumph View Post
        How many pieces of luggage cost upwards of $2,000?
        People trust valuables well over $2000 in the luggage holds of airplanes all the time. Laptops, cameras, and other electronics are packed below deck on every flight every day.

        Originally posted by triumph View Post
        If the wheelchair could be stowed empty in a separate area of the passenger compartment, probably the size of two seats, with some kind of "cage" device over the whole chair and locked in place, or even in a separate "room", that solution would prevent movement or damage of parts. Some chair-users would want to remain in their chairs, others would not.
        You're suggesting that two seats be removed form the front of the plane which is normally first- and business-class sections. The loss of those seats would increase the ticket price for every one else on board. And you're also suggesting that those who would want to stay seated in their chair would sit in this 'cage' you propose? How exactly would that work?


        Originally posted by gjnl View Post
        A "what came first the chicken or the egg" conundrum. Would wheelchair manufacturers be challenged to make better, safer wheelchairs for travel if wheelchair users stayed in their chairs in flight.
        I'm sure they would, but at a premium price. Chairs that would be "approved for flying" would have to be all-new designs with stronger materials. Why would insurance cover a $6,000 "FAA Approved" manual chair when a normal manual chair would still cost $2000? You'd likely be paying out of pocket and I don't think the demand is there.

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          #19
          Originally posted by brian View Post
          I'm sure they would, but at a premium price. Chairs that would be "approved for flying" would have to be all-new designs with stronger materials. Why would insurance cover a $6,000 "FAA Approved" manual chair when a normal manual chair would still cost $2000? You'd likely be paying out of pocket and I don't think the demand is there.
          Better and safer chairs wouldn't be a bad thing for all forms of transportation, i.e., car, plane, train, mass transit.

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            #20
            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
            Did you read the bill? https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-...bill/1318/text

            [B]

            This would prohibit practices such as those where a well-known disability activist was denied a flight (earlier this year) because the pilot was not "comfortable" having him aboard.





            You may have been lucky to run into only "properly trained" people helping you board and unboard, but that is certainly not the experience I have had traveling with my mother, and reported by many on this site, and my clients, some of whom have actually been injured by untrained "lifters".



            and



            These were not a part of the original bill and needed to be added.

            That is not all inclusive, but hits the high points.

            (KLD)
            [/LEFT]


            I did read it and I had others like myself that travel a lot read it and they too thought it was a waste of efforts.

            Government overreach is not needed the laws and support are there our community just needs to stand up and exercise their voice and needs.

            "This would prohibit practices such as those where a well-known disability activist was denied a flight (earlier this year) because the pilot was not "comfortable" having him aboard."

            What activist was denied a flight?

            If you're thinking who I think your talking about you notice how that story just disappeared with zero follow up and though he would never admit it his was simply airlines practice of overbooking and he was singled out to give up his seat. Had nothing to do with his disability.

            I am by no means "lucky" my Wife will tell you our 1st years of traveling with a larger 3 wheel scooter ended in non stop disasters. I like others left it up to the "experts" after enough damage and then repairs I became the expert 1st learning everything I could about boarding mobility and unboarding.

            We worked with the corporate office of Southwest Airlines on helping them come up with new procedures and best practices.

            When you engage in your boarding process and explain your needs and your chairs break down it minimizes the issues.

            We have since worked with executive levels with Delta, US West now American, Jet Blue, Hawaiian Air, etc

            Luck has nothing to do with it...Its our life and when you become the expert you can tell others things that will help simplify our lives.



            +++$2000 limit is for suitcases only doesn't have anything to do with wheelchairs, powerchairs, walkers etc that is repaid at the repair cost or replacement full cost.

            If they started removing seats to accommodate wheelchairs then that is going to drive up the cost of seats even higher...Simple supply and demand less seats = more cost per seat.
            Last edited by RollinPositive; 23 Aug 2017, 2:02 PM.

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              #21
              Brian: No, sorry, didn't mean the disabled person might choose to stay in a "caged" wheelchair. To clarify, a person may wish to transfer to an airline seat while the wheelchair is stowed on-board somewhere in the passenger section.
              I feel the ideal situation, probably years away, would be the option of staying in one's wheelchair on board, such as is possible on trains, buses, subways.

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