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    Anyone snowmobile?

    Well, even if you don't, you gotta love 'em - they already come equipped with hand-controls by default.

    I would love to drive a snowmobile, however not sure if any C6 quads have been able to pull it off (I've seen C7 quads do it however). Anyone know?

    Here are three sweet videos of SCI'ers going sleddin' - the first shows a para going on a several mile trek, the second shows Trevor Moen, the purported best para snowmobiler alive, and the last videos shows a female getting in on the fun - Jana "Banana" Shafler going on a trek in CO.

    Check 'em out: http://www.spinalpedia.com/blog/2012...asily-adapted/
    May the fetus you save be gay

    #2
    I clicked that and it said reported attack page. I hope it's just a false positive but you should run a virus check. Is the video on you tube instead?

    I used to snowmobile quite a bit and would like to buy my own but I need a better storage solution first.
    Andrew

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      #3
      I tried it, but my thermal regulation is so bad that it took me hours to recover. It was shitloads of fun and as a para pretty easy to get on/off but man I was cold.

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        #4
        I'm a T 5/6 and I snowmobile. I use a strap to keep my legs together and I have a back rest on my sled.

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          #5
          I have a Trail Roamer,There were not many made. You sit inside it,also there was a snowmobile in the 70's called a Raider, you sit in those too,but they don't have reverse like the Roamer.I am also a C-6 and could probably ride a regular sled (with a modified backrest)just google them,
          Nelson
          C-6,complete

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            #6
            Hey Everyone,
            I just bought a snowmobile in November and I am really looking forward to using it this winter. I had a backrest put on it but other than that its mostly stock. I had a rack also installed that hopefully my chair can sit on and I can strap it down... I'm pretty sure I will have to flip my chair upside down to keep it on the back of the sled.

            Another tip I once heard is that you can put velcro on the bottom of your pants and the soft side of the velcro on the seat, to keep you put of course.

            I will try and post some pics once I have the setup all dialed in.

            Here is a pic with my little guy sitting on it.
            Last edited by Jim; 27 Dec 2012, 11:24 PM.
            www.KeithLarocque.com

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              #7
              Originally posted by t8burst View Post
              I tried it, but my thermal regulation is so bad that it took me hours to recover. It was shitloads of fun and as a para pretty easy to get on/off but man I was cold.
              Would LOVE to but have T8's cold worries. Even if I stole a man's heat and brought fur, it would take a while. So cold outside tonight - even my cat backed away from the door! lol
              Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

              T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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                #8
                I Think that the cold would kill me off. You can rent them and ride up to Crater Lake, about 2.5 hour drive from here. Maybe if I could get my hands on the very best boots, my feet freeze ridding my hand cycle, let alone a snow mobile. But it would be fun to try, and I could warm up in the truck afterwords. Damn, putting ideas in my head.
                T12L1 Incomplete Still here This is the place to be 58 years old

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                  #9
                  A lot of the newer sleds have feet warmers, I know a few people that have that option, and they have to turn it off they get so warm. Even have heated jackets/helmets to go along with the hand and foot warmers.

                  My biggest concern is getting stuck, as most of the riding here is in the road ditches. Well, also having a $10k sled, and only about 1-2 weeks of ride-able snow a year..
                  T8/9 (2-24-06)
                  IOWA

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                    #10
                    I had Polaris 500 Classic for two years and sold it to a friend cheap on the condition I could ride it whenever I wanted. That was 8 years ago, I have not rode it since.

                    For me it is too much work for the satisfaction I get from it. I am C6-7 and while getting on/off is easy enough, I want to ride it a lot harder than my body will allow. My daughter is to the age she might like to go for a ride so I may take her but other than that I doubt I will get back on one, now a RAZR with tracks would change my tune on "Snowfun"....

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                      #11
                      T8, did you wear a snowmobile suit? Between silk heavy duty long johns and a full mobile suit you'd just need a great hat and helmet and gloves. Many around here get their first suits at thrift stores and garage sales.
                      Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                      Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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                        #12
                        I did not have any problem with being cold, and I get cold really easy. I had the most trouble with all the bumps making my bladder want to spasm at the smallest amount. Wear snow pants, heavy socks and boots, good coat, helmet, you'll be fine. My feet were hot when I got undressed.
                        Andrew

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                          #13
                          I am a T6 complete. Not only did I ride, but was a guide in Colorado. Heated hand grips, seat, vest. I didn't do the heated boot thing as I had a friend get 2nd degree burns from them. Back rest and strap to hold my knees. Left hand aux throttle for side hilling. I loaded and unloaded my sled myself. Hooked up the trailer myself and drove my Jeep to the trail heads.
                          A quad would need a back rest, knee strap. Ability to steer by pushing against the bars. It would take some practice to run the throttle smoothly if you had to push it with your arm. (Normally they are run with your right thumb). You'd have to fall off a few times to learn your balance. With good clothes, you should be able to ride a couple hours without getting too cold. Like I said, beware of heaters if you can't feel them. You should be able to run packed trails and lakes. Powder is the thing that takes practice, but its soooo worth it, because you feel like you're floating when you get it right.
                          I liked Polaris sleds, then Yamaha, Artic Cat. Because in that order they were the most stable. The Ski Doo's I found to be too tippy. I never could get the balance right.

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