Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

quadriplegic musicians?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #46
    Looks like an Irish harp.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    Comment


      #47
      Thank you, Patrick ; ). Are you playing your ukeleles lately? I remember you had some hand or wrist surgery not long ago,
      I hope you're recovering nicely.
      Yes, that harp could be called a soprano harp--it's a lap harp, but I play it on a table. That particular harp has two rows of strings,
      a diatonic row ( like the white keys on a piano) and a chromatic row (piano's black keys notes) so I can play music with both sharps and flats.
      I started playing a long time ago on a small harp with only one row of strings, about six months after my C5 SCI incomplete injury and
      I could only use my right index finger, but I saw Harpo Marx playing a melody using only his right index finger on harp and I thought that harp would be a lot more fun for finger exercises than what I was attempting to do at OT sessions. I think that a small tabletop harps could be great tools for helping incomplete quad SCI and stroke patients, because you get instant feedback, reward and you have built in motivation to keep going so as to play a tune.
      If a small, flat based harp could be firmly fixed to the table, the person could plant their elbows on either side of harp and if needed, use support slings for their wrists to lower the arm/finger to the string, place fingertip and pull back on string, and play a note with very little strength. Making music is a most rewarding pursuit, as you know well. I tried to persuade some Occupational Therapists to look at the benefits, but they thought there would be too many hurdles with tuning the harp, studying music themselves. If anyone on CC is interested in knowing more about using the harp for increasing hand function, I will be happy to try give some helpful information. I know that I got more return of hand function in both hands than I would have otherwise simply because I became hooked on playing and I kept practicing daily and pushing further, which I probably wouldn't have done had I only had my frustrating OT exercises to work with. Maybe OT is more interesting now than it used to be, but I couldn't crumple the paper or push cans around on a table top or make my fingers pull little attached weights and I was not motivated to work at it until I found something that really engaged my interest and gave me an instant feedback of a note sounding.

      Comment


        #48
        It's a modern version of a Baroque era Spanish cross-strung (chromatic) harp, but I do also play the single row diatonic Irish harp.

        Comment


          #49
          How neat! One could easily watch that and not realize you are a quad.
          chair user since 2009 from a neurological disorder

          Comment


            #50
            Incomplete quad. Here’s another one, you can see how I extend my wrist so that my fingers fall forward onto the strings:
            https://youtu.be/3s0k8J7y3es

            Comment

            Working...
            X