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    NO pain.

    My son has been injured for 2 and a half years. He is C7 level, incomplete. I asked him today (I know, this is a dumb question) why he thought he didnt have any pain like some people who are SCI. I have read here that some people dont have any pain at first and then after a while end up with pain. Why doesnt he have any and also, why do people end up with pain later on in their injury. Could it be that his spinal cord was damaged more seriously than diagnosed?

    #2
    hey syd.....as many will prolly reply here...everyone is sooo different. for me, i'm c6,7 and also 2 1/2 years post. i really don't have any pain. i do have some nerve damage that causes my hands to burn, but not enough to get excited about. i would just consider being a little lucky, and no, i do not think that mine or his is damaged more seriously than diagnosed.





    Life isn't like a bowl of cherries or peaches. It's more like a jar of jalapenos--What you do today might burn your ass tomorrow.

    If you ain't laughing, you ain't living, baby. Carlos Mencia

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      #3
      It's the luck of the draw. Just be happy your son landed on the good luck side of the pain spectrum. They don't know why some of us have pain and some don't, why some only have pain in a small area and others have it throughout their body, why pain remains stable in some who have it and keeps getting worse in others, etc.

      Alan

      There's a fungus among us, and I'm not lichen it!

      Nerve Center Telnet BBS - tncbbs.no-ip.com
      Alan

      Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

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        #4
        SydneyJo,

        Pain from SCI, at least the neuropathic pain that I think you're talking about, has to do with how the sensory nerves are damaged. They are separate from the motor nerves and if they are simply damaged, an incomplete injury, that is where the greatest potential is for neuropathic pain that can set in over time. If your son has made it 2.5 years, I'd guess he has a pretty good shot at not having to worry about it kicking in. Some people experience it pretty much right away and others don't feel the pain till a few months later, but the odds are in your son's favor after this long.

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          #5
          Jo,

          About 50% of people with spinal cord injury havve chronic pain. About 15% have severe neuropathic pain that is not adequately addressed with the standard therapies of Elavil, neurontin, and other drugs.

          In animal studies, we have seen that rats that received methylprednisolone do not show as much evidence of post-spinal cord injury pain. Did you son get methylprednisolone and how soon after injury?

          Wise.

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            #6
            Dr. Young,

            I did. They gave to me after the failed embolizations,but it didn't prevent the intense neuropathic pain that started after the first procedure [img]/forum/images/smilies/frown.gif[/img]

            gretchen 1
            gretchen 1

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              #7
              Originally posted by Wise Young:

              Jo,

              About 50% of people with spinal cord injury havve chronic pain. About 15% have severe neuropathic pain that is not adequately addressed with the standard therapies of Elavil, neurontin, and other drugs.

              In animal studies, we have seen that rats that received methylprednisolone do not show as much evidence of post-spinal cord injury pain. Did you son get methylprednisolone and how soon after injury?

              Wise.

              Dr. Young,
              Yes, Jesse received methyl........, and he was given it right away when he arrived at the hospital, which was probably about 2 to 3 hours after the injury.

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                #8
                Dr Young,I was also given methylprednisolone after my injury, but that did not stop me from getting CP. Do you have the stats on who gets CP between complete and incomplete injuries? I would imagine that the incompletes are much higher.

                mike
                mike

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                  #9
                  Hi SydneyJo,
                  How awsome he has remained pain free. To people who ask I like to describe us with SCI as snowflakes. We are all sooooo different even though we may look alike because of the chair and/or similar injury levels. My t12 vertebre shattered into my spinal cord. My neurosurgon said it was like picking out tiny little shards of glass...I agree with Alan, what really is going on inside each individual is the luck of the draw...that's why we are not totally comparible like snowflakes. Here's my story of SCI and pain:

                  I've been a t12 incomplete since 1982. I have been using a wheelchair because my limited walking ability did cause muscle spasms around my fusion and was painful. As long as I didn't try to walk I was pain free.

                  I've had a full life while using a chair all these years. I got further in my education and personal/professional development than I could have ever imagined (I was 18 when my accident happened and took it HARD).

                  After 23 pain free and active years in a chair I developed a burning on the back of my thigh while I sat (at my 40hr/week job). Initially I was diagnosed with piriformis syndrome (no treatments worked). The pain finally settled into my left cheek (the one down south). I was then diagnosed with several nerve entrapments syndromes but no treatment gave me relief.

                  A year later I was diagnosed with central pain. My docs (and I) believe that I probably had pudendal nerve entrapment to begin with but because my central nervous system has been compromised (since 1982) this pain became centralized. It's my understanding that we can develop central pain at any time because of that initial spinal cord injury (is this true Dr. Young?)

                  Since I found these message boards I have been very suprised at how many people have serious nerve and/or central pain right from the beginning of their injury. My memory of rehab back in the early 80's is that we didn't talk about pain that much. I may not have an accurate memory since I was pretty much in shell shock myself but it does make me so sorry...even without the pain it's a b**** to adjust to a SCI but survivable.

                  I am bedridden and heavily medicated now. I cannot sit without excruciating pain. I'm glad I didn't realize that this type of pain could develop at any time during these last 23 years. The medical field didn't even realize back in 1982 how SCI's would age and what our issues would be. We are all going to develop something someday, that's aging.

                  The two things I would change is that I would be more vigilant about pressure reliefs on my previously skinny a**. I was so cocky...I never did them. And second, I would be vigilant about the cushions I used. Mine was broken down and I was bottoming out....regret is hell. I had a good time before the pain joined me...I just have to focus on reinventing myself again.

                  I hope your son continues to have many pain free years in his life...

                  Terry

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                    #10
                    May son is T12, complete. Only 10 months post, but pain-free (knock on wood), so far.
                    BeeBee

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                      #11
                      It seems that many (if not most) quads have little if any pain. It's the low Thoracic and Lumbar injuries that get the most and worst pain. I don't know why...Dr Young?

                      Kap
                      accept no substitutes

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                        #12
                        I have cerebral palsy, not SCI, but thought I would add this for the benefit of the folks here who are up and walking: please be careful.

                        The emphasis when I was growing up (I'm almost 49 yrs old) was walking at all costs, since few things were accessible and I was not even allowed to attend public school if I couldn't walk.

                        The problem is that as a spazz, I learned to walk "incorrectly"--very bad posture and joint alignment. Didn't bother me--I could go for miles on crutches! (AHHH, youth!)

                        I look back on all that and simply CRINGE. As you might imagine, I am paying dearly for all of that physical abuse now. My joints are completely shot, especially right knee, hip, elbow, shoulder. My standard joke is that the flesh-eating termites are 1) asleep 2) amassing an attack 3) devouring 4) in retreat...etc.

                        Please keep in mind, joint alignment is SO IMPORTANT; putting weight on joints in lopsided and haphazard fashion is a recipe for disaster later in life. (I assume that includes posture when sitting, too, but weight-bearing seems to do the most damage.)
                        Last edited by MrSoul; 7 Jul 2005, 11:51 AM.
                        "Who are all these strange ghosts rooted to the silly little adventure of earth with me?"--Jack Kerouac

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                          #13
                          Post Injury Pain

                          Wis. Dr. Bob Wyserski told me they think the reason for the pain is the injury actually travels slowly right off the bat. After time passes the traveling injuy wakes up so to speak and creates pain in an area that is relatively "now" a new injury or in an area that was not injured before. He said that they also think they understand why the lower injuries tend to be more painful; Doc WIse... can you comment on this???? Why the lowers seem to be more painful. Mikey.
                          Mike (Florida)

                          Cant we get 1 do over?

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