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    #16
    Testosterone replacement does come in patch forms as well.

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      #17
      Dear Arndog,
      I have been on a clinical study with the Kessler Institute in New Jersey using Androderm Testosterone patches. Each patch contains 24.3 mg. of testosterone. I have been on it since June of 2009. I currently use two patches a day. I was monitored a few times the first six month , then I am checked and scanned a couple of times for the rest of the year. They monitor your body fat, lean tissue, water weight, etc. on a body index machine. They take a lot of blood to monitor all types of proteins, fat, cholestrol, PSA, liver enzymes etc. It is actually a great study. They monitor the heart, arteries anything you can think of that testosterone would change. I have seen posititive results in lean tissue, loss of fat , strength and endurance. It is a plus for any spinal cord person to be on it if they have low testosterone. Your levels start to dip anyway over the age of 40. I started feeling so well six months into it , that I started to decrease my medications. Then I really seen a difference in energy levels , moods etc. Being on 3200 mg of Neurotin a day plus the lyrica and hydrocodone it was hard to workout and feel good. I did use a heating pad last nite . I turned it on medium and slept on it. It did ease my pain a little. I even feel better this morning. Take care and have a great day!
      Best Regards,

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        #18
        Dear Tam63,
        Yes, I was on 3200 mg of Neurotin a day plus the Lyrica 150 three times a day. They were giving me both together along with the 10/325 Hydrocodones as needed.

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          #19
          That's interesting - I have not heard of neurontin and Lyrica being used together.

          Combined, that sounds like quite a bit to me - personally, I'd try just one of them to start (probably Lyrica) - and see how it goes.

          It's very hard, with a whole bunch of meds in the act, to tell what is helping, and what is causing side effects. When possible, I've found changing one thing at a time (new med, dropping a med) is best - that way you can tell if something changes - what did it. Or at least it's easier.

          Do be careful with the heating pad btw - most are not designed to have you lie on them. My husband did that and fell asleep - and I discovered the thing brown and sorta melted... I was not pleased...

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            #20
            Tam,
            I appreciate the insight on the heating pad. I am being careful because I was burned once before and learned a good lesson.
            When I was at Magee rehab, they started me on the neurotin and then added lyrica. I was on it for almost two years together. It did manage the pain but I always had some. I even had four epidural injections the first couple of years but they did not help at all. Maybe it took a few months for all of the medicines to clean out and this is why I am getting pain again. Who knows. I don't have to much faith in the pain specialists in my area or my spinal cord doctors. They are great people but I believe they don't have the experience with neuropathic pain and just try on the next that might of worked on the patient before. It is kind of trial and error when it comes to this kind of pain. That is why I am so amazed at the different kind of meds all of us are on in this forum. I understand our injuries are all different but you would think there would be some type of universal drug like an asprin to take a headache away or thin the blood. thank you for your consideration. You are very right at only trying one drug at a time. I wonder how long it does take for the body to react to a single drug. One month or two? or just a week?

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              #21
              Unfortunately, for neuropathic pain, at the moment managing/reducing it is the best people usually achieve.

              Even the doctors with lots of experience just have to try what worked for some patients, and experiment, and see what works for a particular one - there's no "one size fits all" apparently. If your doctor is willing to work with you, try different things, and listen to you and keep trying - that's quite possibly a good pain management doc. Of course, if you don't like/have faith in the doc, then you may want to try a different one.

              I believe for drugs such as Lyrica and Neurontin, often the full effects don't happen immediately. Personally, I'd try it at least a month before saying it didn't help.

              Now, if you're in big pain, I might break my "one at a time rule" and ask them to increase the opioid at least temporarily, to try to break the pain cycle. You'd still be able to tell if the Lyrica/Neurontin/Topamax/etc. was working, if you were using a short-acting opioid - as you'd be able to tell when the opioid dose wore off how the pain was doing.

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                #22
                Originally posted by JoeMonte View Post
                I hear the Tomomax is good. I am looking for something that will knock me at at nite. It is just unbearable during the nite time.
                Joe I had quite a bit of success with Topomax in terms of helping with neuropathic pain. I was originally taking it as an anticonvulsant so realizing it was also helping with pain was a rather serendipitous discovery. It also helped with knocking me out at night, difficulties sleeping being another big issue for me. Unfortunately I experienced a huge weight loss while taking it (a common side effect I was told) so had to eventually discontinue because that was starting to become a health issue itself. Unfortunately it seems there always has to be a tradeoff. It's too bad because Topomax has been one of the few things so far that has helped with my pain.

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                  #23
                  I want to thank all of you for the feedback. It is a great to have such positive notes from everyone to make some good decisions and pass it along to my doctor. Thanks again , I wish you all well.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by TAM63 View Post
                    Unfortunately, for neuropathic pain, at the moment managing/reducing it is the best people usually achieve.

                    Even the doctors with lots of experience just have to try what worked for some patients, and experiment, and see what works for a particular one - there's no "one size fits all" apparently. If your doctor is willing to work with you, try different things, and listen to you and keep trying - that's quite possibly a good pain management doc. Of course, if you don't like/have faith in the doc, then you may want to try a different one.

                    I believe for drugs such as Lyrica and Neurontin, often the full effects don't happen immediately. Personally, I'd try it at least a month before saying it didn't help.

                    Now, if you're in big pain, I might break my "one at a time rule" and ask them to increase the opioid at least temporarily, to try to break the pain cycle. You'd still be able to tell if the Lyrica/Neurontin/Topamax/etc. was working, if you were using a short-acting opioid - as you'd be able to tell when the opioid dose wore off how the pain was doing.
                    I agree with your last paragraph. What I would measure is, how many times per week did I need a break-through pain med. So when I was off Lyrica, I needed 14 OxyIR a week whereas on Lyrica, it only averaged out to 6 per week. (I am fabricating these numbers - your mileage may vary). So I would conclude that the Lyrica is helpful although clearly did not eliminate the problem.

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                      #25
                      c5,6 quad i take flexorill muscle relaxor 10 mg in 2 hours iam asleep. knocks my ass out and gets a full nights sleep

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                        #26
                        c5,6 quad i take flexerill 10 mg muscle relaxer knocks me out in 2 hours. sleep through the whole night

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                          #27
                          What do you think the a striking electrical shock is due to? Has your doctor given you any ideas? Sometimes I get shooting pains in my feet and legs but I tend to think that it may be due to a pinched nerve in my back. I don't know for sure that that's what it is but that's what I suspect. I find doing stretching exercises and doing meditation helps quite a bit. Also, I'm resting on a acupressure mat in the evening when I watch TV and that seems to help too. I hope you get your problem alleviated soon. Too bad you have to take drugs for it.

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