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My Pain Doctor in WA state Raided, I am without my meds! Help!?!

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    #46
    I would hate it if it happened to my pain DR but it never would. I've been useing him for 15 years. He has lost a lot of business because he is strict. He caught his patients abusing, selling or the big one, going to other Dr's for pain meds. That's a no no for a pain Dr.
    I do and know many sci people that take valium. One friend takes one in the morning and one at night. I take a 10mg at night to calm down my legs and to help me fall a sleep.
    My GP will not give out a lot of pain meds every month. He will send you to a pain Dr.
    There are a lot of Dr's around here in Louisiana and Texas that are getting busted. Mostly for oxicotin. There are so many people that have nothing wrong with them that are hooked on pain meds. It's crazy.
    Mary
    I want to Rock you Gypsy soul and together we will flow into the Mystic.
    Van Morrison

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      #47
      DEA - Closed Dr. Office

      I have been seeing a Pain Dr. for 2 years and the DEA closed the office up until furthur notice. I was under a pain contract. Well what about all the people that we seeing this DR. I am out of pain meds and told from the office to go to the ER and they said there is nothing they can do.
      I was seeing the Doctor monthly and getting my scripts. I called the Pain Clinic they are telling me I need a referral well it takes time to get a Primary at least 1 month to get into a Primary. I called the DEA very upset and told them you are heartless, they said go to the ER or Detox I am not a junkie. I told them the ER is telling people there is nothing they can do. I need my meds to function on a daily basis. How can they get away with this is beyond me. I am wondering if we can get a class action law suit against the DEA. Life without meds is life in bed - no work - no life. I was out of work last week for 4 days could not move. I have a friend that has given me some meds until I can find a Dr. -- Can the DEA do this? Is this legal? To leave people that have been on a controlled substance for years with no meds? What is the DEA issue. There is no covering Dr. for him. Is there supposed to be someone covering for this Doctor? They need to give everyone a chance to get another Doctor, in the meantime we all should have been given at least scripts for a month until we can get another Dr. I feel so bad for the Dr. he was a caring Dr. he was the kind of dr. that would not give meds without proof of a problem.
      I am in desperate need of a Dr. to get my meds. I am in Mass area and if anyone can help with this please send me a response. THE DEA ARE HEARTLESS PEOPLE THAT THINK WE ARE JUNKIES... WE HAVE REAL MEDICAL ISSUES WITH DOCUMENTATION (MRI'S, ETC)TO PROVE IT!!!!!

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        #48
        Unfortunately, the DEA isn't responsible for getting you medical care. They're responsible for preventiong violations of the law. So I don't think there is any basis for a lawsuit.

        That said, even in you WERE a junkie (and I am not saying you are) it could be dangerous to suddenly stop your medications.

        You don't have a primary care doctor? If they are willing, any doctor could prescribe you the medications you are already on temporarily.

        Ideas:

        Perhaps ask the ER to just refer you to the pain clinic.
        Try asking for the hospital social worker.
        Try going to a urgent care clinic, and see if someone will give you a referral.
        Call all sorts of primary care physicians, and ask for the first available appointment. Ask to be called if there are any cancellations.

        Sorry you're going through this.

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          #49
          I know of a Pain Dr. in Covington, near Kent, WA. Am I allowed to state the name of the clinic? Or the doctor's name?

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            #50
            Originally posted by fallNApart View Post
            I know of a Pain Dr. in Covington, near Kent, WA. Am I allowed to state the name of the clinic? Or the doctor's name?
            Yes. It's ok

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              #51
              Pain Doc In Kent, WA

              There is a MultiCare clinic in Covington. In that clinic is a Pain Management doc whose name is Louis Jacobson. The number there is 253-372-7000.

              I have to say that he only prescribes 2 opiates. MS Contin and Methadone. That's it, no breakthru meds whatsoever.

              I was with him for a couple of years, but had to leave because my pain was getting to be more than he was willing to treat.

              Best of luck!!!!

              fallNApart

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                #52
                Dea

                I am very sypathetic to those who lose their doctor because of the raids, even after they have done everything right. The point here though is that these raids do not happen unless there is a abundance of evidence that shows the the doctor is doing illegal activities.

                While a lot of the these clinics seem legit on the surface, there is an undercurrent of criminal activity that lies in plenty of these clinics. Keep in mind the DEA just does not kick in doors of just anyone that they want to. A judge has to be convinced that there is enough evidence showing illegal prescriptions are being obtained.

                I am not siding totally with the DEA on this, however I am saying that if the Dr or someone at his office is committing a crime should it be overlooked because he is also doing good things? There are plenty of people every day that do good things but are criminals. should we take that into account for everyone committting a crime?

                I have suffered from Chronic Pain for over 15 years so I know that being without meds is not a place you want to be. That is why it is critical to chose a Dr that you know is 100%. My recommendation is to find a Dr that is affliated with a medical school or that your insurance company recommends. Also, take the time to research where you are going. Do just go because they give the meds you like.

                I might take a lot of heat for this, but I stand behind law enforcement to protect us from criminals. If you cannot see if from that standpoint, I am not sure what to tell you. If your doctor was out robbing banks or killing people you would want him shut down. Consider this the same thing.

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                  #53
                  Many clinics are what is termed "Multi-faceted." That means they treat with bio-feedback, psychiatry, and anti-depressants. If that's the kind of pain you have, by all means... GO!
                  Last edited by megghegg; 11 Jan 2010, 1:57 PM.

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                    #54
                    Thank you for your posting. It is difficult for me not to rail against some of these know-it-alls.

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                      #55
                      Yes, I believe the term I head most used is "multi-disciplinary" approach to pain management. Many of the large teaching hospitals with reputable programs will have doctors from different departments available for consultation regarding the pain, given that chronic pain is not a uni-dimensional problem. I believe most of us understand ongoing pain, and often find it is associated with depression. Anti-depressants also often have the benefit of relieving our pain (especially some meds for fibromyalgia, or other chronic pain syndromes). Any doctor who will only have you pay cash, up front deposit, seems like a scam to me. Many of the over prescription of opiates and other related addicting drugs, have been linked to many long term problems in health.

                      I have heard some people say to just take pain meds, with the relief of pain as the top priority (no matter what..). I am concerned about this. That "no matter what" is what is most troubling. If one keeps taking addicting pain meds in high quantities, at first, it may help the pain. But then ones body gets accustomed to it, so they have to increase their use.
                      Rebound pain can be worse than the original pain. I found this article which I thought did a pretty good job explaining it. http://www.bayareapainmedical.com/wrebound.html.

                      I have heard some say it would be better to take the chance of being addicted to the pain meds, than to be in pain. I understand how disabling pain may be, but I don't see the logic of saying that someone who is "addicted" is somehow in less pain than one who is just in pain, etc. People who have true addictions have to go through a very
                      painful process of getting off the drug. The disability from pain, is now "added to" with the disability of being physically dependent and emotionally dependent on the drug.

                      Again, responsible pain clinics will be able to be paid for with most reputable health insurance companies (private or Medicare/Medicaid). Any clinic who hides under labels and demands cash up front or deposits, certainly would or I believe "should" send off major red flags to the astute consumer.

                      I agree with the above post to check out your doctor too. Medical state licensing boards in the US have public information about any doctors who have had their license revoked or disciplinary actions.

                      I just read this thread started a year ago...
                      Last edited by med100; 11 Jan 2010, 2:38 PM.

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                        #56
                        MED100 and I disagree on the opioid therapy. Fair enough.

                        I believe studies have shown that there is a very low risk of becoming addicted to opioids, if you are actually in pain. The risk is not zero - but it is very low. There are risks to any medication. With opioids, as with any medication, the potential benefits must be weighed against the risks. Opioids are excellent and safe medications, prescribed and used correctly.

                        It used to be thought that everyone who took opioids had a big risk of addiction. But the current thinking in pain management now no longer agrees with that - the risk is generally considered to be low. Extra care must be taken with patients who have a history of substance misuse, or other factors that put them at a higher risk. But if other pain management medications and strategies do not work, then opioid therapy is generally recommended. There was just a recent continuing medical education show on this topic - as many practicioners (and the public) still mistakenly fear these medications. The show talked about not only opioid therapy, but also the impact that unrelieved, undertreated pain has on the patient, and society.

                        I also believe it is not true that as everone's body gets used to the medication, the dose has to be increased. In some cases, that does happen. But for many people, they reach a stable dose that controls their pain, and remain at that dose.

                        Like any medication, there are some side effects, and some risks with opioids. But unrelieved pain is itself a risk, and has many consequences. I believe the most modern teaching is not not fear these drugs. Use appropriately, take care, assess risk. But do not be afraid of them.

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                          #57
                          Oh yes, I do agree entirely with MED100 that things like clinics that require cash payments etc. do not sound like a good plan.

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                            #58
                            Med100, It would appear that you are someone who is not, or has never been, in chronic severe pain. To bad there is not a filter to keep people like you from posting. Your kind of post is such a waste of time because it is never appreciated by the people who need this forum the most. Have you ever thought about being an evangelist? You know so much about it.

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                              #59
                              People have different experiences. I do not really doubt MED100 has good intentions. I cannot say nothing ever goes wrong for people who take opioids - perhaps MED100 has seen one that went wrong. But I still believe, for most people that need them, opioids are safe and hopefully effective.

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                                #60
                                Meg, I did not write not to ever take prescribe opiates from responsible medical oversight for chronic pain, so please , before you try to write defaming comments, re-read the post- please. Clearly, it was missed. TAM, I will PM you....
                                Last edited by med100; 11 Jan 2010, 7:37 PM.

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