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    what to do?

    Having tried everything with no success, my doctor and I have no idea what to try. I ned something to reduce the scraping, burning, and tight as concrete feelings in my back and abdomen, even if the numerous other feelings and the rest of my body isn't affected.
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

    #2
    Alan, what happened when you tried TENS? Also, if you're primarily searching for local area relief, have you considered botox injections? I've heard of that being used for peripheral neuropathy or localized symptoms.

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      #3
      TENS didn't help. Impanted spinal cord stimulator in 1985-1986, position revised three times, did nothing for any pains anywhere, and they were 22 years less intense. Talked to docs about Botox, but they didn't think it would help, because the muscles aren't actually that tight, they just feel cramped and stiff as concrete (along with the other sensations I feel.)

      Some oral med must be able to help a little, without intolerable side effects.
      Alan

      Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

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        #4
        Alan,


        Have you ever thought it could be an allergy type stomach reachion. I get stomach cramps from potatos. Caffeine is a tricky one too because it's hasa semi anti histamine properties.

        I forgot to mention chemical reactions too.
        Last edited by Malibu; 29 Aug 2008, 8:35 PM.

        ` Signatures for Spinal Cord Research

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          #5
          i've tried botox in my legs and back with no results at all.

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            #6
            Yoga.
            Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

            I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

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              #7
              Not allergies, just part of my full body central pain, which keeps getting worse. Nothing helps. No surgeon ever would deal with my scoliosis and shoulder blade problems, and MRIs apparently didn't show my cord was tethered, so nothing was done about the hole in my cord.
              Alan

              Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

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                #8
                Have you considered acupuncture?

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                  #9
                  Can they fix the hole in the cord or are the doctors just no seeing it. Get a CAT scan or other image. I think there's one called a Body Scan or maybe a nerve image from a MNR (magnetic nerve resonance).

                  ` Signatures for Spinal Cord Research

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                    #10
                    I've had lots of MRIs. Doctors see the hole, say it isn't a syrinx and that there's no tethering of the cord.

                    Tried accupuncture several times.
                    Alan

                    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

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                      #11
                      I would imagine the hole and spinal fluid is causing pain. Can't they do something about that hole. I know that must be fairly fragile tissue even without a hole.

                      ` Signatures for Spinal Cord Research

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                        #12
                        Alan,


                        Sorry to hear about the pain. But there are some food molecules that causes more pain. One of these is the pepper molecules. Potato is said to be included in the pepper class.

                        Capsaicin is one of the first six molecules found in peppers.

                        Food

                        Because of the burning sensation caused by capsaicin when it comes in contact with mucous membranes, it is commonly used in food products to give them added spice or "heat" (pungency). In high concentrations capsaicin will also cause a burning effect on other sensitive areas of skin. The degree of heat found within a food is often measured on the Scoville scale.
                        Cooling and mechanical stimulation are the only proven methods to relieve the pain; capsaicin is not water-soluble, so water and most other liquids will only dull the pain by cooling the area, but will not have any lasting effect. The burning sensation will slowly fade away if no actions are taken. Dairy products are one of the most effective forms of relief; casein, a phosphoprotein found in milk, acts as a detergent to dissociate the capsaicin from nerve receptors, allowing it to wash away. (Dustrophsky, 2006). [8]
                        It is common for people to experience pleasurable and even euphoriant effects from eating capsaicin-flavored foods. Folklore among self-described "pepperheads" attributes this to pain-stimulated release of endorphins, a different mechanism from the local receptor overload that makes capsaicin effective as a topical analgesic. In support of this theory, there is some evidence that the effect can be blocked by naloxone and other compounds that compete for receptor sites with endorphins and opiates.[citation needed]

                        Capsaicin is currently used in topical ointments to relieve the pain of peripheral neuropathy such as post-herpetic neuralgia caused by shingles. It may be used in concentrations of between 0.025% and 0.075%. It may be used as a cream for the temporary relief of minor aches and pains of muscles and joints associated with arthritis, simple backache, strains and sprains. The treatment typically involves the application of a topical anesthetic until the area is numb. Then the capsaicin is applied by a therapist wearing rubber gloves and a face mask. The capsaicin remains on the skin until the patient starts to feel the "heat", at which point it is promptly removed. Capsaicin is also available in large bandages that can be applied to the back.
                        Recently, capsaicin is being tested for the prevention of pain post surgery. David Julius, a physiology professor at the University of California, San Francisco, recently discovered that capsaicin selectively binds to a protein known as TRPV1 that resides on the membranes of pain and heat sensing neurons. TRPV1 a heat activated calcium channel, with a threshold to open between 37 and 45 Celsius degrees (37 degrees is normal body temperature). When capsaicin binds to TRPV1, it causes the channel to lower its opening threshold, thereby opening it at temperatures less than the body's temperature, which is why capsaicin is linked to the sensation of heat. Prolonged activation of these neurons by capsaicin depletes presynaptic substance P, one of the body's neurotransmitters for pain and heat. Neurons that do not contain TRPV1 are unaffected.[9] This causes extended numbness following surgery, and the patient does not feel pain as the capsaicin is applied under anesthesia.
                        The result appears to be that the chemical mimics a burning sensation, the nerves are overwhelmed by the influx, and are unable to report pain for an extended period of time. With chronic exposure to capsaicin, neurons are depleted of neurotransmitters and it leads to reduction in sensation of pain and blockade of neurogenic inflammation. If capsaicin is removed, the neurons recover.[citation needed]
                        Not sure what effect overexposure is indicating here except maybe the anesthetic property.

                        There is still a lot to read at wiki. Here's just a few lines taken out of paragraphs.
                        In 2006 it was discovered that tarantula venom activates the same pathway of pain as is activated by capsaicin, the first demonstrated case of such a shared pathway in both plant and animal anti-mammal defense.[7]

                        Capsaicin /ˌkæpˈseˌɪ.sɪn/ (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the active component of chili peppers, which are plants belonging to the genus Capsicum. It is an irritant for mammals, including humans, and produces a sensation of burning in any tissue with which it comes into contact
                        I know all peppers are not chili type but they all all probably working the same way.

                        When the spray comes in contact with skin, especially eyes or mucous membranes, it is very painful, and breathing small particles of it as it disperses can cause breathing difficulty,
                        The burning and painful sensations associated with capsaicin result from its chemical interaction with sensory neurons.
                        They cause burning or stinging pain to the skin, and if ingested in large amounts by adults or small amounts by children, can produce nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and burning diarrhea.

                        Ingestion of spicy food or ground jalapeño peppers does not cause mucosal erosions or other abnormalities.[22] Some mucosal microbleeding has been found after eating red and black peppers, but there is no significant difference between aspirin (used as a control) and peppers.
                        It's in the skins of fruits too.


                        Capsaicin is present in large quantities in the placental tissue (which holds the seeds), the internal membranes and, to a lesser extent, the other fleshy parts of the fruits of plants in the genus Capsicum. Contrary to popular belief, the seeds themselves do not produce any capsaicin, although the highest concentration of capsaicin can be found in the white pith around the seeds.[6] The seeds of Capsicum plants are predominantly dispersed by birds, as birds lack the receptor to detect capsaicin (i.e., because they cannot sense capsaicin, it is not an irritant to birds). Chili pepper seeds consumed by birds pass through the digestive tract unharmed, whereas those consumed by mammals do not germinate at all. The presence of capsaicin in the fruits therefore protects them from being consumed by mammals.
                        About the underlined above. It helps to deadened but in a sci person, it might be causing pain even if you are not allergic. Poison control sees a lot of cases with this it says. I'm thinking there are a few sci's who have some sensitivies since potato is even considered a pepper according to some.

                        My thinking is there is a up and down cycle going on in people's gut. The pepper is a big antagonist and may be causing pain. Were the only mammal that consumes this.
                        Last edited by Malibu; 5 Sep 2008, 8:40 PM.

                        ` Signatures for Spinal Cord Research

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                          #13
                          And you probably can't find many foods without a pepper molecule added. One was man made so it just goes to show you how much spice humans add. Trace amounts doesn't even get included in food labels unless it's over a certain percent. So it is shocking the nervous system as it's designed to do.

                          Spinal cord injury slows the gut down and then the medications slows it down even more. One of the properties of the pepper molecule was to help motivate the gut or whatever it's other purposes might be. Think tarantula spider. It activates it's enemy so much it can't move. Then think of it in the gut. It's mother natures way of hitting the gas pedal. Then pepper even slows the gut down if it gets some toxicity; because of a shock effect.

                          This may not be the source of you pain as you said with the hole and there are some pain studies being done with the pepper molecule. But that would probably not be much different than the dull neuro that comes with sci in the first place. It's the other problems associated with sci and even pepper in some cases of toxicity levels being over sensitized. Just try going a week without pepper to see what this does to the stomach pains Alan. I hope it helps.

                          ` Signatures for Spinal Cord Research

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                            #14
                            Alan,


                            Did you catch that post in the cure forum about a grafting onto the spinal cord. Even if it didn't regenerate, would this take the hole pain away. I don't understand why doctors leave a hole in your spinal cord. I'm not even sure how to help you search for answers on this one. What reasons did you get for this, may I ask.

                            ` Signatures for Spinal Cord Research

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                              #15
                              The various doctors over the years said the hole wasn't a syrinx, and there wasn't cord tethering, so nothing was done.

                              I guess my scoliois wasn't dealt with because I didn't meet the requirements on the degree of curvature chart, or something. Nobody cared how the curves affected my life.
                              Alan

                              Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

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