Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

25 days later

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    25 days later

    My little brother was a victim of a random act of gun violence 3 1/2 weeks ago. The hospital staff even said it was worse then Chrisopher Reeves injury and that they have not seen any injury that high ever. He was shot in the C-1 vertibrae, and the Neurology Practitioner said the bullet entered his C-1 and penetrated the spinal cord and is currently lodged in the spinal cord on the other side and said that it is best not to even operate, because history has shown that their is very little possible benifit and more potential harm. currently all he can do is shrug his shoulder a little bit and more his face and head a little bit. and is ventilator dependent, but his is responsive and communicate a little using a blinks and an alpha nuemeric board. they said that his C-1 is fractured, he said there pretty much was a hole in it with the bone pretty much pulverized where the hole is situated. i just wanted to know if anybody knows much about leaving bullets in the spinal cord, and any other information.

    #2
    Hi Jessman - I can't answer your question but I've moved your post to the New SCI area where it will garnish more hits.

    I'm sorry about your brother and have no advice to give, save to say that you're a wonderful brother trying to find out as much information as you can to help him. This is a great site hosted by a wonderful researcher, along with some priceless nurses with their wealth of info. There are other gun shot victims here, hopefully someone will chime in soon with some ideas.

    Welcome to CareCure!
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

    Comment


      #3
      So sorry about your brother, but I am glad you found us. I will ask Dr. Young to comment about the bullet, but meanwhile, where is your brother? How old is he? What plans are there for moving him on to a specialty SCI rehabilitation program? Are they taking great care to prevent any pressure ulcers or other skin breakdown? Can you ask the doctors about his actual neurologic level and ASIA classification?

      Please come back and ask any questions. We will help as much as we can.

      (KLD)
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

      Comment


        #4
        Jeez, another person paralyzed because of gun violence. I for one is a victim of gun violence too; it was a drive by shooting. The right to bare arms my fu**ing ass. This law needs to change, we are not living in the 18th century where people needs guns to protect themselves during the times when wars are frequent. Now, the US is the gun violence capital of the world. Now, I'm sure some of you gun lovers will jump in and defend this law.

        Ok back to the topic. My friend that was with me that time was also hit too, and paralyzed. In the hospital, doctors and nurses were amazed that 2 people are paralyzed at the same time from the same incident, we were like celebrities in the hospital during our +2 months stay. My friend was hit in the T1 vertebrae directly, and the 9mm bullet bounced upwards towards his neck and lodged in next to his c vertebrae(forgot which c level). The surgeons never took out the bullet either, as they said its not harmal to the surrounding tissue, plus it would be difficult removing the bullet. Your brother's situation is different, where the bullet is lodged in his spinal canal? If thats the case, through commen sense, isn't it better to take out the bullet thats in the canal? I would think having a bullet right in the cord would defeat any chances of a possible small return. I wonder how difficult it is to take out the bullet.
        May 2000, T4-5 Complete.

        Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo

        Comment


          #5
          My brother is at HARBOR-UCLA county hospital, in Los Angeles, California. He is 21 years old, and he may be going to Rancho Los Domingo... as far as pressure ulcers and skin break down they are turning him every 2 hours. as far as neurologic level and asia classification i will ask later today, but i beleive he has a complete spinal injury.

          thank you very much for any information.

          Comment


            #6
            hi jessman, i don't have an answer to your question, just wanted to say that it's a good sign that he csan shrug his shoulders. how's he holding up? if he wants to communicate with other quads, i'm sure a lot around here, including me, would be happy to do so. you must be going through a lot too and there are others here who went through that too.
            i hope he has a speedy recovery

            Comment


              #7
              Rancho Los Amigos (in Downey) is an excellent rehabilitation facility. It is an LA County System hospital, and a SCI Model Systems Center.

              When you get there, be sure to hook up with the SCI clinical nurse specialist, Marilyn Pires. She is a wealth of information and assistance and is an internationally recognized expert in SCI care. I hope he able to be moved ASAP.

              (KLD)
              Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 9 Sep 2007, 1:03 PM.
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

              Comment


                #8
                I'm so sorry to read this about your brother. My sympathies to you and your family at this trying time.

                Comment


                  #9
                  thank you for the comments and concern, im sure he would like to communicate with alot of you. but i guess we will have to wait to find out what kind of ways we can use to help him communicate. but does anybody have any kind of information about surgery to remove the bullet logded in his spine?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    sensation question

                    I was mentioning that my brother has a bullet in the c-1... in his actual spinal cord. he says he feels some pressure when his left arm is touched, sometimes; but sometimes he doesnt. and when his left leg spasms he says he feels it. and says he some times has some slight sensation on his left side and in his chest. and for the most part his left side is the only side i see ever spasm. oh yeah, when his leg hairs on his left leg are pulled he spasms (is that just a reflex). i was wondering what this all means if anything... any info on this would be greatly appreciated... and if anyone has any information if the bullet in his spine should be left in or not, would be greatly appreciated.

                    thanx alot.

                    p.s. his injury occured a month ago.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Having some sensation below the level of injury is always good news...it is just not possible to say if this will continue, or if it will be accompanied eventually by any voluntary movement.

                      The movement of his legs you describe is reflex movement, and should not be mistaken for voluntary movement. Unfortunately it is also not a predictor of any return.

                      I have asked Dr. Young to address your question about the bullet, and I am sure he will as soon as he gets time. In my experience, bullets are often left in place for fear that removing them may cause more damage. It is always a good idea to get a second opinion on a decision like this though.

                      When is he going to Rancho?

                      (KLD)
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        i talked to them today and they said probably soon, but he is definately going. they are just waiting for the go ahead right now.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by thejessman3
                          My little brother was a victim of a random act of gun violence 3 1/2 weeks ago. The hospital staff even said it was worse then Chrisopher Reeves injury and that they have not seen any injury that high ever. He was shot in the C-1 vertibrae, and the Neurology Practitioner said the bullet entered his C-1 and penetrated the spinal cord and is currently lodged in the spinal cord on the other side and said that it is best not to even operate, because history has shown that their is very little possible benifit and more potential harm. currently all he can do is shrug his shoulder a little bit and more his face and head a little bit. and is ventilator dependent, but his is responsive and communicate a little using a blinks and an alpha nuemeric board. they said that his C-1 is fractured, he said there pretty much was a hole in it with the bone pretty much pulverized where the hole is situated. i just wanted to know if anybody knows much about leaving bullets in the spinal cord, and any other information.
                          thejessman3,

                          I am so sorry to hear about your brother. Ranchos Los Amigos has a great deal of experience with gunshot wounds and has been fairly aggressive about removing the bullet. Leaving the bullet in the canal does have some potential consequences. The first is that the bullet may migrate. Leaving the bullet also may result in inflammation that may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Finally, it may compromise the remaining function that he has. In my opinion, this is one fo the most difficult decisions that the surgeons have to face, i.e. the fear of doing some harm and the fear that not doing something may lead to harm.

                          My advice is to ask the doctors at Ranchos. They may decide to go ahead and remove the bullet.

                          Wise.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Very sorry to hear about your brother.

                            My sons' injury is also from gun violence. T4 complete. The bullet was never removed, it is sitting by his right armpit. Sometimes removing it can cause futher damage. I have asked the doctors and was told that they would consider removing it only if it is causing Jordan a lot of pain and discomfort.
                            My mouth is like a magician's hat, never know what might come out of it.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by macska
                              Very sorry to hear about your brother.

                              My sons' injury is also from gun violence. T4 complete. The bullet was never removed, it is sitting by his right armpit. Sometimes removing it can cause futher damage. I have asked the doctors and was told that they would consider removing it only if it is causing Jordan a lot of pain and discomfort.
                              macska,

                              I agree with your son's doctors' opinion. I want to emphasize that my post below was related to bullet in the spinal canal. If the bullet is outside the spinal canal and not adjacent to a vital organ (such as the heart, brain, aorta, etc.), it can be left in and removed if it causes problems.

                              Let me add a little history. Much of the attitude on gunshot wounds came from Vietnam where early attempts to remove the bullet usually did not result in much return of function.

                              In the 1980's, I had difficulty convincing my neurosurgical colleagues to include patients with gunshot-wound induced spinal cord injury into the clinical trial testing methylprednisolone. The reasons?
                              • Many neurosurgeons felt that gunshot wound induced spinal cord injury is so serious and the primary injury so devastating that there was no point in treating with anything such as methylprednisolone.
                              • Often, the bullet may have gone through the gut and there may a serious risk of infection. Since methylprednisolone is believed to be immunosuppressive, many neurosurgeons were reluctant to give the drug in a case with potential infectious risk. However, it turns out the methylprednisolone (at least given for 24 hours) does not increase the risk of infection significantly.

                              As a result of the decision to exclude patients with gunshot wounds from our trial in 1985, the study published in 1990 did not address the issue of methylprednisolone treatment of gunshot wounds and could not recommend the treatment. Therefore, in the United States today, there is no clear policy regarding use of methylprednisolone to treat people with gunshot induced spinal cord injury.

                              At Bellevue Hospital, where I was for 20 years, we routinely treated patients with gunshot induced spinal cord injury. Those patients did not get worse and I think benefited from the treatment. It is sad that we excluded those patients and we never were able to carry out another clinical trial to test the hypothesis that methylprednisolone would be effective for gunshot induced spinal cord injury.

                              Just before the Gulf War, I thought that we could collect data on methylprednisolone treatment of people with gunshot wounds. But, there were few spinal cord injuries in those cases. I can't help but wonder whether the U.S. are now treating soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan with methylprednisolone. I hope so because I think that it does help.

                              Wise.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X