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Recent Accident to My Son

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    Thanks for your comments.
    Wise decision on getting that M.A.

    Comment


      Actually, in most states you can be licensed as an MD (and practice) without a residency, as this is required for specialization. Physicians who did not do a residency are considered GPs (general practitioners). They must graduate from medical school, and take the national physician licensing exam. Specialists must, in addition, complete a residency (which varies from 2-8 years, depending on the specialty) that is accredited by the specialty board organization, and take their board certification exam. So for example, physiatrists do 3 years of residency in PM&R following their completion of medical school (at which time they obtain their MD license). Residents and fellows are already MDs. Most medical schools no longer have interns; they have replaced this title and role with first year residents. A fellowship is additional training after the residency is completed, and may be required for some specialties. For example, in order for a PM&R physician to sit for the SCI Medicine board exam now, they must complete both a specialty residency and board certification (usually PM&R) and then take a special SCI Fellowship of 1 additional year.

      (KLD)
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

      Comment


        Thanks SCI-Nurse clarifying this. The years of training that a doctor is required to complete is unbelievable. The general public should be educated about the difficulty and the years that a doctor has devoted to learning the profession. On the news we hear about the rogue doctor who have stolen Medicare money by cheating.

        Roger

        Comment


          Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
          Actually, in most states you can be licensed as an MD (and practice) without a residency, as this is required for specialization. Physicians who did not do a residency are considered GPs (general practitioners). They must graduate from medical school, and take the national physician licensing exam. Specialists must, in addition, complete a residency (which varies from 2-8 years, depending on the specialty) that is accredited by the specialty board organization, and take their board certification exam. So for example, physiatrists do 3 years of residency in PM&R following their completion of medical school (at which time they obtain their MD license). Residents and fellows are already MDs. Most medical schools no longer have interns; they have replaced this title and role with first year residents. A fellowship is additional training after the residency is completed, and may be required for some specialties. For example, in order for a PM&R physician to sit for the SCI Medicine board exam now, they must complete both a specialty residency and board certification (usually PM&R) and then take a special SCI Fellowship of 1 additional year.

          (KLD)
          Sort of.

          Once you graduate medical school, you get the M.D. title or D.O. if you graduated from Osteopathic School.

          You then apply for a Post-Graduate Year 1 Internship in an American College of Graduate Medical Education accredited training program. The PGY-1 internship can be in General Medicine, Surgery, Psychiatry, Pediatrics etc. There are also Transitional Internships that provide a broader specialty exposure and more electives. For other specialties, its possible that you might do an internship at one hospital and a residency at another and not necessarily in the same state.

          Each year, on the 3rd Friday of March, the National Resident Matching Program holds a "match" for Internships and Residency Programs. If you love a program and they love you back, you both rank each other highly in hopes that you will match. If you don't get a match there's a secondary process that helps unmatched doctors find unfilled spots in internship and residency programs.

          With a completed Internship year and having passed all three US Medical Licensing Examination steps, you can apply for a state medical license. Once you have the state license, you can work in the medical profession and obtain permits to prescribe medications. But without residency training and specialty board certification, you'll have trouble obtaining hospital privileges and your access to insurance networks may be limited. Getting malpractice insurance may also be more difficult.

          The typical PM&R SCI Fellow will have had had one year of internship (usually in Medicine or Surgery) /PGY-1, three years of PM&R Residency/ PGY2-4 and a year of Fellowship/ PGY-5.
          Last edited by 2drwhofans; 16 Jul 2015, 10:20 PM.

          Comment


            Roger, FYI. SCI nurse has noted the website www.usajobs.gov for another medical student on this site who is not planning on doing a residency. I have checked this website and wanted to let you know in case your son wants to explore the process for application for Federal employment. The application process can take a while. The Federal government is aggressively seeking disabled applicants many in high level positions.

            Comment


              Triumph thanks for the information. Brian has been looking at the usajobs.gov website.

              Brian has completed the OBGYM rotation that he was worried about. At the end of the rotations the doctors that Brian works with fill out evaluations. Ann said that when Brian read the comments he almost cried. All of his grades were above expectations or excellent. With each excellent grade they're required to write a comment. Some of the comments were:

              Brian's presentations were the best that they had ever seen from a medical student.
              The chief resident said that Brian was always prepared and she learned things from Brian.
              Another doctor said that Brian had the qualities that a Surgeon General should have.


              These are just a few of the very positive comments.

              A week from Tuesday he starts the ICU rotation. According to the comments that Brian has read this is another difficult rotation. After the ICU rotation Brian will study and then take the STEP 2 exam in Philadelphia. The final rotation PREPARATION FOR RESIDENCY is taught after January 1 so he is going to have free time between the STEP 2 exam and the beginning of PREPARATION FOR RESIDENCY rotation.

              Roger

              Comment


                I've spent the last several nights reading through your journey here and I can't quite describe what it's done for me. My 17 yo son is inpatient at Shepherd with a C4 injury. I wanted to thank you for documenting your son's progress and endeavors here, it has restored a sense of peace in me that has been missing for the last month.

                Comment


                  Thanks, Roger, for the update. Congratulations to your son on completing the rotation and the great reviews for his hard work!

                  Comment


                    This update was just great to read before my daughter starts her own college journey.

                    Comment


                      Dear Roger
                      I appreciate you son's strength in life. His progress and endeavors give me sense of belief in me that has been missing.
                      However honestly I still find it difficult to overcome myself now. I am trying to go on keep like nothing has changed.
                      Thank you so much for documenting his journey and sharing!

                      Comment


                        Alfiet

                        Please understand Brian's life since the injury has had ups and downs. Even after the significant accomplishments there have been dark days.

                        Brian's recovery has not been a straight line. There have been major setbacks that at the time he didn't think that he could overcome. In many respects going back to school has been a blessing. Academic work is a outlet where Brian knows that he can excel in spite of injury. I think for Brian that's the key that keeps him going in a positive direction.

                        Roger

                        Comment


                          Dear Roger,
                          That is the reason why I admire Brian's endeavor. I will note Brian's progress as a reality documentation for my journey.
                          Hopefully I can do as Brian did.

                          Comment


                            Roger, sent you a PM.

                            Comment


                              Brian had some good news to share last night. In September he has an job interview with one of the large health care consulting companies in Bethesda. He was pretty excited about the possibility. He scheduled the interview for a day in September that he has off from the ICU rotation that he starts tomorrow.

                              I think that his qualifications are impressive. A business degree from UC Berkeley, MPH from Johns Hopkins and an MD from Johns Hopkins, May 2016. Besides the academic credentials he has worked for a medical consulting company in San Francisco and he has two papers that he has written dealing with health care delivery.

                              Roger

                              Comment


                                Sounds wonderful and perfect for him. We will keep our fingers crossed for the interview!

                                (KLD)
                                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                                Comment

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