Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Recent Accident to My Son

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Brian has a big day tomorrow. He will be tested in eight clinical specialties. The one area that he won't be tested on is the class that he was told not to attend last Monday.

    Saturday Brian practiced with a doctor from Hopkins who has a spinal cord similar to Brian's injury. The idea was for the doctor to show Brian how he does some of the things that Brian is being tested on. The practice session helped some but there are many things that Brian has to demonstrate that the doctor has not done for a long time. He made some suggestions that Brian will incorporate.

    Brian prepared a document listing the accommodations that he requires in each clinical specialty. I just hope that the doctors at Hopkins are sincere about giving Brian a chance and are not just building a file so that they can prevent Brian from entering the hospital clinical rotations. We won't know until after the test tomorrow.

    Roger

    Comment


    • Hope that both today and tomorrow go well for Brian.
      Every day I wake up is a good one

      Comment


      • On Monday Brian was tested for three hours. He thinks that he did OK but he hasn't heard anything official yet. During the testing Brian found a few things that he has to work on and a few things that he needs to do differently.

        The testing was very stressful and by the time that it he was done on Monday Brian was questioning whether the going through all of this stress was worth it. The next morning he was feeling better and ready to continue. Unfortunately he has to go through this whole thing again on Friday.

        Roger

        Comment


        • Roger, I've been lurking this thread for a long time. I didn't think that the condo issue would ever be resolved, and now I'm on pins and needles wondering about how the whole clinical testing would be resolved. I can't even imagine how you and Brian are handling it. I've been at UMass Amherst since fall of '96 getting a BA in geology, a MS in geography and am now working on a second MS in geology. I have been my own advocate for all of that time, and am impressed by Brian's self-advocacy letter. He hit the exact tone that administrators have to respond to if they don't want to be left open to a lawsuit, and the unspoken threat is the only thing they truly understand. Kudos to you both.
          Don - Grad Student Emeritus
          T3 ASIA A 26 years post injury

          Comment


          • Donno

            Thanks for your encouragement and you deserve congratulations for your academic accomplishments.

            Roger

            Comment


            • Brian passed a big test today. There was a written test and he had to demonstrate that he could preform the necessary functions in a clinical setting.

              Two weeks ago he was told that he couldn't continue in the program and today he passed the class. Brian is on spring break starting Monday. During the next two weeks he is going to review for the board exam and then take the exam on March 22 & 23. Then after that is over he will spend the first nine rotation working on improving his physical examination skills. This is the remediation that the doctors decided was necessary before he could start working at the hospital.

              Roger

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Roger View Post
                Brian passed a big test today. There was a written test and he had to demonstrate that he could preform the necessary functions in a clinical setting.

                Two weeks ago he was told that he couldn't continue in the program and today he passed the class. Brian is on spring break starting Monday. During the next two weeks he is going to review for the board exam and then take the exam on March 22 & 23. Then after that is over he will spend the first nine rotation working on improving his physical examination skills. This is the remediation that the doctors decided was necessary before he could start working at the hospital.

                Roger
                Just ran across this thread, speaks volumes of having a great family. Would be nice to hear from the doctor-in-training himself, too.

                I completed my B.S./grad school/M.D./PMR residency after a C6 motor complete injury. Vocational rehab paid my med school tuition; I intentionally mentioned the Client Assistance Program in my initial correspondence with them, perhaps that "facilitated" their approval as I hoped. No assistant in med school/residency, private pay for aide during that time (I lived alone). Became boarded SCI Medicine, academic practice x 17 years. Married, 6 year old twin boys.

                I encountered some issues similar to those described - clearly some faculty were less than enthusiastic about my presence on the wards. Glad to hear that in Brian's case, the med school administration has stepped up from the sound of things.

                The simplest, most reasonable way to address the dexterity/exam/procedure/OR/CPR-ACLS issues comprehensively would be to use the Association of Academic Physiatrists' guidelines. Any student should be able to "understand and direct the methodology involved" for any procedure s/he can't perform independently. The AAP white paper describes this in detail under 3. motor: http://www.physiatry.org/Education_White_Paper_1.cfm


                Hope to hear this story turn out well. Please email me if you need a letter of support along the way. Getting an internship and residency AND a job can be very challenging for a quad. See the posts in the disabled physician thread in CC.

                All the best.

                Ed Nieshoff MD
                ecnieshoff@gmail.com
                Ed from Detroit

                Comment


                • The letter basically told Hopkins to blow-off. Does the mind set of this arena of academia really believe themselves? Brian is very lucky to have an excellent support system. Dr. Nieshoff nailed it with "understand and direct the methodology involved".
                  Brian, keep moving forward.

                  Comment


                  • Dr. Nieshoff

                    Thank you for posting the information about your experiences and congratulations for your extraordinary accomplishments. When you were in school 17 plus years ago I'm sure the obstacles were formidable.

                    I forwarded your post to Brian and he is going to be in contact with you. Again I really want to thank you for taking the time to share your experience with us.

                    Brian is a member of Carecure and posts occasionally under the name walderness.

                    Roger

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by orangejello View Post
                      Well said, on all accounts.

                      Last year I was almost railroaded out of a graduate program myself. When I turned to the one place at the university that should have supported and advocated for me--the school's office for accessibility--I was given absolutely no support. In fact, I was encouraged to withdraw myself by the head of that department. In the end, I ended up needing to advocate very aggressively for myself. And like Brian, I had to step on a few toes and put in writing things that some administrators at my university did not like. I was even threatened with an non-academic misconduct charge at one point for simply speaking the truth and forwarding emails where I was told to quit my program by disability services. It was incredibly stressful and I felt like I was going up against the university all on my own. In the end, I started to question if it was worth the personal cost to me to continue. But it was because I knew that if I gave in and went away like the school hoped, there would be another student down the road facing the same issues I faced. From what I have read about Brian in this thread over the past few years, he has an incredible will. I hope he will stick with it and advocate for himself as hard as he needs, regardless of what his adviser and others say. It will be worth it. For him and for other students after him.
                      Absolutely YES. We have to be our very own aggressive advocates. I could not begin to make a list of all the nonsense and disrespect I endured after my accident...It all ended in the Courts. I still chuckle when I read some deposition excerpts...One prominent academic to whom I sent an email saying "stop the patronizing abuse" said that I had an "impenetrable facade." Meaning...I would not bend to their discrimination and abuse!

                      Comment


                      • My wife Ann was in Phoenix for about three weeks. During that time Brian was living on his own except for a nurse who came each morning. Yesterday, Ann flew back to Baltimore and I fly to Baltimore on Friday.
                        Next Tuesday and Wednesday Brian takes the Step 1 Board Exam. Brian took the Step 1 Board Exam last November but had medical problems and didn't pass the test.

                        During the test he overheated and nearly suffered heat stroke. The problem occurred because the room where he was taking the test was warn and he wasn't allowed to remove his sweater once he started the test. This all sounds crazy so I'm going to stay at the testing facility while Brian is taking the test to make sure that nothing stupid like this occurs again.

                        Wednesday Brian had a meeting with his adviser the medical school associate dean of student affairs and the medical school vice dean. At the meeting the vice dean was very supportive. He told Brian that they would meet every Friday to discuss what accommodations Brian required at each step during the clinical rotations. He stressed the point Brian's physical limitations created a special situation that justified accommodations. One of the instructors in the Transition to Wards Class asked the question. If Brian received an accommodation then shouldn't all of the students receive the same accommodation? The vice dean said no, Brian's situation is different and it was understood when Brian started medical school that appropriate accommodations would be made when necessary. Thank goodness that the vice dean stepped in and provided the adult leadership that was needed.

                        Roger

                        Comment


                        • Roger, thank heavens for this vice dean! It sounds like they are showing the reasonableness that they lacked for the first attempt at Step 1 Board exam. GOOD! Happy for you and Brian.

                          Comment


                          • Brian took the Step 1 board exam yesterday and today. I went with him to the testing center on Tuesday morning. On that morning in Baltimore the outside temperature was 60F, the hallway in the building was 75F and the lobby of the testing center was 81F. As we stood in the testing center lobby waiting to check in I was wiping perspiration off of my forehead. It was unbelievable I was standing in a Class A office building in short sleeves sweating on a cool April morning.

                            Last November, Brian overheated at this same testing center while taking the Step 1 board exam. That's why I went with him to make sure that similar problems that not reoccur. I talked to the the office manager and explained why the office temperature was unacceptable and requested that they turn on the ventilation system before the testing began. With that they called the building maintenance man and had him turn on the ventilation system. I found out from the maintenance man that the thermostat was programmed so that ventilation system was not turned until later in the morning. I think I offended the office manager. She told me that I had to wait in the hallway while Brian took the test. Then later when I went back into the lobby to check the temperature she told me that I was allowed in the test center lobby once each hour to monitor the temperature. Obviously she was determined to show that she was in charge. I didn't make a scene but if that temperature didn't drop I was going to ask to speak to her supervisor. I still might follow up with a letter to the testing company now that I seen for myself what the test conditions were like.

                            Brian will find out in a few weeks how he did on the exam. Brian's goal was to do much better than just passing the exam.

                            Roger

                            Comment


                            • Brian had good news today. He found that he passed the Step 1 Board Exam. His score was 10 points above the mean and 15 points above the mean for the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation medical students. PM&R is the area that Brian plans on going into. Obviously passing this test is a huge load off of his mind.

                              Brian has been meeting with the doctors at the hospital where he'll be doing his clinical rotations. These meeting have gone very well. It seems like many of the problems that Brian encountered have been resolved since the medical school Vice Dean got involved. Now, when necessary, Brian is going to have an assistant who will work under his supervision. The assistant will preform any physical tasks that Brian is unable to perform. When Brian is tested on a procedure he'll be required to explain how he would direct his assistant to complete the task. This procedure has been used in the past for students with disabilities.

                              Roger

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Roger View Post
                                Brian had good news today. He found that he passed the Step 1 Board Exam. His score was 10 points above the mean and 15 points above the mean for the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation medical students. PM&R is the area that Brian plans on going into. Obviously passing this test is a huge load off of his mind.

                                Brian has been meeting with the doctors at the hospital where he'll be doing his clinical rotations. These meeting have gone very well. It seems like many of the problems that Brian encountered have been resolved since the medical school Vice Dean got involved. Now, when necessary, Brian is going to have an assistant who will work under his supervision. The assistant will preform any physical tasks that Brian is unable to perform. When Brian is tested on a procedure he'll be required to explain how he would direct his assistant to complete the task. This procedure has been used in the past for students with disabilities.

                                Roger
                                Congratulations to Brian, and to you. This is quite a success. He not only passed the boards, but he did WELL.

                                This new plan for ongoing detailed discussions with the doctors involved in the clinical rotations is entirely appropriate. The Vice Dean is completely correct in his plan for reasonable accommodation. Thank goodness.

                                Now the excitement really begins. Medicine!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X