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Recent Accident to My Son

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    My jaw dropped after reading this amazing thread. Roger - you must be bursting with pride. The schools are all going to fight over him. If I had to med school again, it would be Stanford, then UCSF (I just had revision spine surgery there 7 months ago at Moffet ) and then Hopkins. I think the general happiness quotient is higher out west. My med educ. was at Yale School of Medicine probably before Brian was born but I got very nostalgic reading your thread. How exciting and will continue to follow this saga...
    jon

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      Brian and my wife went to see a surgeon at Stanford to inquire about tendon transfer surgery. The recovery from this surgery is about five months. During that time Brian couldn't use his hand at all. Two operations are required. During the five month recovery period Brian would have to use the power wheel chair and all transfers would have to be done with the Hoyer lift. He wouldn't be able to self cath.

      There are only a few surgeons in the country that do this operation. Brian has talked to two of them. One doctor in Colorado and the second doctor at Stanford. The doctor in Colorado is retiring and his associate is taking over for him. Based on the telephone conversations Brian decided to go to Stanford for an appointment to talk in person with the surgeon.

      This is a difficult decision because Brian is making progress at becoming independent and this would be a big set back. On the other hand Brian feels that he needs to do this surgery now because it would be impossible after he started medical school.

      Brian has researched this surgery and posted questions on Carecure under the username walderness.

      Roger

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        Roger,
        How absolutely thrilling that Brian was accepted at JH!! As for San Francisco, I can understand why he would want to go to a familiar place, but I have a feeling he will have NO problems making friends wherever he goes. He is an outstanding person, with or without a SCI, and that is in no short measure due to the love and support you and your wife have shown him. Congratulations to everybody!!

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          BTW, I know this has to be his decision completely, but if it was me I wouldn't put my life on hold for five months no matter what. Clearly they want him just as he is.....

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            Brian has decided to have the tendon transfer surgery. He called the doctor at Stanford and asked the doctor to schedule the surgery as soon as possible. It will probably occur sometime in mid January. As I mentioned before this is a major set back for Brian's efforts to become independent. He moved into the house next door to our house and has been becoming more independent.

            One of Brian's best friends from college is visiting this weekend. I haven't seen the two of them all weekend which is good. I sure Brian would prefer to see much less of his parents.

            Roger

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              Susan about Physical Therapy Models for SCI

              Roger,

              I am sorry to hear about your son's injury. He is fortunate to have you researching the options that are out there. I am a PT and I completed my dissertation on SCI recovery in 2004. The models for rehabilitation of SCI have grown over the past two decades. Almost all facilities have a strong exercise component with sprinkling of other strengths. These other components are what I suggest you look into when deciding where to go for PT for your son.

              I have found that there are at least six components necessary for a person with SCI to move into a Self Correction Mode: 1. Stage Focused Exercise (at least 3 hours of movement per day appropriate for the Stage of Recovery the person is currently at), 2. Electrical Stimulation (both Neuromuscular causing a muscle to contract and Threshold for physiology and sensory stimulation), 3. Sensory Preparation (multiple facets including brushing and vibration, placed just prior to exercise to awaken the sensory receptors), 4. Laser (to accelerate the healing process),
              5. Biophysiography (nutritional components in and elimination of 'garbage' out from the body), and 6. Structural hands-on therapy (to align and connect the anatomy, as well as drain and stimulate the physiology, with the goal of optimizing structural integrity).

              I currently have 7 persons active in our SCI Recovery Program with C6 or higher level lesions. Most started at Stage 2 (little triceps and no ability to sit or transfer independently). Recently, one of these (a gentlemen in his sixties who was diagnosed 2 years ago with a C6 complete injury) just walked 120 feet around our facility, with the aid of knee immobilizers, ankle foot orthoses, a gait trainer and assist for forward leg progression. This particular man started our program with significant pain and no triceps, and with structural integrity work, laser, biophysiography, electrical stim, and sensory, he now bench presses over 100 pounds and transfers himself independently.

              Most of our patients are willing to provide email addresses. One of our Never Ever Boys, Colin, has a thread on Care Cure called 'My Path of Recovery' (search on the home screen to find). Colin fractured his C4 and has made excellent and continued progress....

              Anyway, please let me know if there is any way I can be of help. Keep researching and the very best of luck.

              Susan

              Comment


                Originally posted by CenterIMT Atlanta View Post
                Roger,

                I am sorry to hear about your son's injury. He is fortunate to have you researching the options that are out there. I am a PT and I completed my dissertation on SCI recovery in 2004. The models for rehabilitation of SCI have grown over the past two decades. Almost all facilities have a strong exercise component with sprinkling of other strengths. These other components are what I suggest you look into when deciding where to go for PT for your son.

                I have found that there are at least six components necessary for a person with SCI to move into a Self Correction Mode: 1. Stage Focused Exercise (at least 3 hours of movement per day appropriate for the Stage of Recovery the person is currently at), 2. Electrical Stimulation (both Neuromuscular causing a muscle to contract and Threshold for physiology and sensory stimulation), 3. Sensory Preparation (multiple facets including brushing and vibration, placed just prior to exercise to awaken the sensory receptors), 4. Laser (to accelerate the healing process),
                5. Biophysiography (nutritional components in and elimination of 'garbage' out from the body), and 6. Structural hands-on therapy (to align and connect the anatomy, as well as drain and stimulate the physiology, with the goal of optimizing structural integrity).

                I currently have 7 persons active in our SCI Recovery Program with C6 or higher level lesions. Most started at Stage 2 (little triceps and no ability to sit or transfer independently). Recently, one of these (a gentlemen in his sixties who was diagnosed 2 years ago with a C6 complete injury) just walked 120 feet around our facility, with the aid of knee immobilizers, ankle foot orthoses, a gait trainer and assist for forward leg progression. This particular man started our program with significant pain and no triceps, and with structural integrity work, laser, biophysiography, electrical stim, and sensory, he now bench presses over 100 pounds and transfers himself independently.

                Most of our patients are willing to provide email addresses. One of our Never Ever Boys, Colin, has a thread on Care Cure called 'My Path of Recovery' (search on the home screen to find). Colin fractured his C4 and has made excellent and continued progress....

                Anyway, please let me know if there is any way I can be of help. Keep researching and the very best of luck.

                Susan

                susan i have appt with you 12/29 3pm

                Comment


                  Brian has scheduled the tendon transfer surgery for Jan 13 at Stanford. The first operation relieves the tension in finger tendons. The doctor told Brian that the surgery takes approximately 1 1/2 hours. Brian will stay in the hospital overnight. We're trying to decide the best way to travel to Stanford. Drive or fly it's about 700 miles from Phoenix to Stanford.

                  Brian is still waiting to hear back from the University of California at San Francisco medical school. He called Monday and they told him that a few letters were going out this week but he probably wouldn't hear until after the first of the year. Brian is enrolling in an on-line class in physiology from UC Berkeley next semester. He has moved into the house next door and is getting more independent each day. That's why this tendon transfer surgery is going to be such a big set back. I've got to get working on making the shower accessible when Brian can't transfer from the wheelchair to the shower bench. I'm thinking that I can mount a rail to the ceiling trusses.

                  Brian hasn't been telling me about all of the medical school interview requests. He been turning down interviews to schools that he knows he woulded want to attend. So far he's had 8 interview requests out of the 15 schools where he applied.

                  Roger
                  Last edited by Roger; 23 Dec 2008, 7:19 PM.

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                    I had a great talk with Brian yesterday, my first and found him to be engaging, insightful and determined. I have no doubt he will do well after the tendon transfer. He is doing it with a goal in mind and that alone makes it easier to accept the setbacks.

                    I would fly, 700 miles post surgery seems like an eternity, especially if he is prone to AD. Splurge for 2 first class tickets.

                    Best to you all.
                    Every day I wake up is a good one

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                      Brian is scheduled to have the initial tendon transfer surgery at Stanford on Tuesday Jan 13. My wife and Brian leave Monday afternoon to fly to San Jose. I'll fly to Stanford Tuesday afternoon to help bring Brian back to Phoenix on Wednesday.

                      Today I'm installing a ceiling mounted unilift that we'll use while Brian is unable to transfer himself. A family from our church gave us the lift. Their daughter was severely injured and needed the lift. She passed away two years ago but they still had the lift in their garage.

                      Roger
                      Last edited by Roger; 11 Jan 2009, 9:14 PM.

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                        Roger,
                        Tell Brian we are all rooting for him. His determination is amazing, and despite this temporary loss of his functional level I suspect he will do fine. YOU are an amazing dad! I love the way you just do what needs to be done (ceiling lift) and make things possible.

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                          Roger and Family: I got an email from Brian after he talked with a researcher and he seemed very jazzed to move forward and have a real positive change in his life.

                          What way did Brian decide to travel home?

                          I must say, Brian is great to chat with, his emails upbeat. I think your family found the formula for getting through SCI.

                          Good luck Brian, hope all goes well and I look forward to additional updates.
                          Every day I wake up is a good one

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                            Cheesecake

                            We'll be flying back to Phoenix Wednesday afternoon. Brian will have the surgery sometime Tuesday.

                            Roger

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                              Originally posted by Roger View Post
                              Cheesecake

                              We'll be flying back to Phoenix Wednesday afternoon. Brian will have the surgery sometime Tuesday.

                              Roger
                              Glad you are flying. When I had my right arm reconstructed, the drive home (35 miles) was the longest of my life. I just couldn't see driving back to Phoenix.

                              Be thinking of you on Tuesday Brian! Keep me posted.
                              Every day I wake up is a good one

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                                Good luck Brian.

                                You can do it.

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