Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Recent Accident to My Son

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    This was a busy week for Brian. He has started the on-line immunology class from UC Berkeley in addition to this and therapy on Tuesday and Wednesday he spent a half day each day at two doctor's offices observing. He hopes to continue this so that he can add clinical experience to medical school application. My wife found out that the son of one of the people she plays bridge with is a physiatrist. Her friend talked to her son and he said that he would be pleased to have Brian come to his office and observe. This all adds to the clinical experience that Brian needs.

    Also on Friday Brian went to the AZ Division of Motor Vehicles and a driving school to learn how to drive a specially equipped car. For some reason Brian's AZ drivers license was still valid we don't know why. Several years ago when Brian was going to school at Berkeley he got a California drivers license. For some reason AZ never canceled his AZ drivers license. Brian's California license expired last July. At the time he wasn't physically able to renew it. The California motor vehicle division requires that you notify them if you have sustained an injury that interferes with you ability to operate a motor vehicle. Anyway that problem has seemed to have taken care of itself. The next step is the drivers training class.

    On Monday I called Restorative Therapies about the RT-300 freezing up in the middle of a session. The technician at RT there changed an INTERNET network setting and we haven't had any more problems. This week I also received the first denial letter from Blue Shield for the Easy Stand 6000 claim that I submitted. A few months ago I purchased a used Easy Stand 6000 from a Carecure member in Albuquerque. The Easy Stand 6000 is no longer available from Easy Stand and Brian preferred the 6000 rather than their new Evolve model. After I purchased the 6000 I submitted a claim to Blue Shield claim for the $800 purchase price. With the claim I submitted: the doctors script, a letter of medical necessity, procedure code and a receipt. The claim was denied because I didn't submit a diagnosis code. Brian thinks that he has the diagnosis code so I'll get that from him today and resubmit the claim again. I doubt that this will be the last denial. You would think that Blue Shield would see that $800 was a bargain because a new Easy Stand Evolve is ~$5000. I don't think that they recognize a savings they just deny everything the first time and hope that you'll go away empty handed.

    Brian received an email from the director of communications at Dr. Keirstead's Lab. She is talking to the doctors at the lab to find a place that Brian can work to get research experience. We're hoping that these arrangements can be completed in the next few months. When they are we'll get an apartment or an extended stay hotel room for the time that he is working at the lab.

    Roger
    Last edited by Roger; 26 Jan 2008, 6:22 PM.

    Comment


      Roger,
      It certainly sounds like things are coming along well, and both you and Brian need a big pat on the back for your perseverence though all of these "steps" back to a life Brian desires. I think you're right, btw, Blue Cross seems to always initially deny and hope that the problem will go away. I bet in the end they pay, it's just how many hoops they make you jump through first. Good luck!

      Comment


        Eileen

        I don't want to create the impression that everything happens smoothly. there are good and bad days.

        Roger

        Comment


          Roger, you may want to look back at your original posts so that you yourself appreciate how far you and your son have come since you first posted here. Your story is such a good example of the importance of family support and advocacy and never giving up or taking "no" for an answer. I hope that others can benefit for your posts here.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


            Originally posted by Eileen
            Roger,
            It certainly sounds like things are coming along well, and both you and Brian need a big pat on the back for your perseverence though all of these "steps" back to a life Brian desires. I think you're right, btw, Blue Cross seems to always initially deny and hope that the problem will go away. I bet in the end they pay, it's just how many hoops they make you jump through first. Good luck!
            I recall reading in the NSCIA newsletter that 75% of all claims for DME are orginally denied; 35% of those are appealed. about 75% of all appeals are granted on the first go round. I believe the percentages remain level for re-appeals and denials for additional rounds but I cannot say for certain. Based on that alone, it certainly seems as though the system is designed to thwart us until we go away frustrated, our condition changes or we die.
            My blog: Living Life at Butt Level

            Ignite Phoenix #9 - Wheelchairs and Wisdom: Living Life at Butt Level

            "I will not die an unlived life. I will not live in fear of falling or catching fire. I choose to inhabit my days, to allow my living to open me, to make me less afraid, more accessible, to loosen my heart until it becomes a wing, a torch, a promise. I choose to risk my significance; to live so that which comes to me as seed goes to the next as blossom and that which comes to me as blossom, goes on as fruit."

            Dawna Markova Author of Open Mind.

            Comment


              Today Brian and my wife Ann went to Tucson. It was arranged for Brian to spend the entire day at a doctors office observing. This is the clinical experience that he needs for his medical school application. Brian's therapist from St. Josephs Hospital arranged this for him. The doctor that Brian is observing is also in a chair with an injury similar to Brian's. They left this morning at 6:00 am, I talked to Ann at about 6:00 pm and they were headed over to the doctor's home so that Brian could see how he had his home setup. It's almost 10:00 pm and they're still not home. I got the impression from Ann that things were going well.

              The doctor that Brian was visiting told him that he should move to Tucson and take classes at the University of Arizona. Tuscon is where the only medical school in Arizona is located.

              Brian has a strange situation with regard to residency. Brian went to UC Berkeley as an out of state student all four years. After he graduated he started working in San Francisco. At that time he became a California resident. The University of Arizona Medical School in Tucson only accepts Arizona residents. Before Brian's injury he resided and worked in California and was ineligible to attend the University of Arizona Medical School. When Brian and I visited the University of California Irvine Medical School last December we met with the director of admissions. She told Brian that the UC Irvine Medical School only accepts students who are California residents and that Brian needed to move back to California as soon as possible otherwise he would not be eligible.

              Brian seems to be a man without residency in any state. He pays taxes and receives disability from California but he's living in Arizona. He has an identification card from California and a drivers license from Arizona. At the moment based on the letter of the law I don't think that Brian is eligible to attend either school. Obviously, we need a plan so that he doesn't get ruled ineligible because of a residency requirement. It's very difficult to get into medical school and Brian doesn't want to be reject for that reason.

              This weekend three of Brian's friends from San Francisco are coming to Phoenix. We own the house next door so we keep that available for people when they come to visit.

              I've been talking to a lady at Kennedy Krieger about the Blue Shield Rt-300 denial. She is working with the insurance coordinator at Restorative Therapies to file a grievance with the California Managed Health Care Commission on our behalf. I'm going to call Blue Shield tomorrow and ask them to explain why they think that the RT-300 is exercise equipment and not necessary durable medical equipment. This was the most recent reason that we were given for why the RT-300 was denied. The original reason that the Rt-300 claim was denied was that the RT-300 was experimental equipment and not covered by Blue Shield. The reasons for the Blue Shield denials never stop changing. Each written denial is different from the preceding written denial. On the telephone the claims representatives say that the equipment is covered if the doctor writes a script. It seems like Blue Shield tries to create confusion to discourage people.

              Roger

              Comment


                Roger-

                Sounds like today was a great day...I'd love to hear more about it after he gets home

                The university system rules for residency are quite complex & require specific documentation & timeframes living in said state(1yr minimum)...Seeing as how Brian has valid gov't ID's from both states(depending on date of issue), he's halfway there to having legal residence for school/tuittion purposes...If you'd like to PM me I can explain a little more about how it works & what he'll need...
                'Chelle
                L-1 inc 11/24/03

                "My Give-a-Damn's Busted"......

                Comment


                  Voters registeration is a key piece as is where he receives his mail.
                  Every day I wake up is a good one

                  Comment


                    Brian and Ann got back from Tucson at about 11:00 pm. The Physiatrist that Brian observed on Wednesday was very kind and Brian was happy about the day. Brian was in the room with the doctor and the patient while the doctor tested the patients for any nerve damage. At the end of the day the doctor invited Brian and Ann over to his home to see how he had made his home accessible. The doctor was injured about four years ago in a skiing accident.

                    On Thursday Brian went to the St. Josephs inpatient rehab and spent the day observing a doctor there. The doctor spent most of his day in consultations with the patients. Brian plans to go back next week when the doctor is going to be doing tests and examinations. I should mention that these opportunities for clincial experience have been setup by the director of the St. Josephs outpatient rehab, Sonya. She has been very helpful to Brian and we really appreciate her efforts.

                    Three of Brian's college friends arrived last night from San Francisco, they're stayed up late last night hanging out. Brian's friends have really been great about coming to visit him. Several of them came to Atlanta when Brian was at the Shepherd Center and now they've been coming to Phoenix. This really raises Brian's spirits, hanging around with your parents and sister gets old.

                    Last night Brian showed his friends the RT-300, so today they want to see him ride it. I went into work today to check on a computer stress analysis that I'm doing so while I'm waiting for that to finish I'm typing this message.

                    Roger

                    Roger

                    Comment


                      I had rehab at St. Josephs in Phoenix AZ a few years ago. I think the folks there was very nice and did a good job. Don’t recall all the names but one PT woman originally from Minnesota working there I remember, she was very good looking too

                      Comment


                        Leif

                        I haven't been to the St. Josephs out-patient rehab with Brian but I know that Brian thinks that Jodie is the best therapist that he's had. Brian has been to Shepherd Center, Kennedy Kreiger and now St. Josephs.

                        Roger

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by Roger
                          Leif

                          I haven't been to the St. Josephs out-patient rehab with Brian but I know that Brian thinks that Jodie is the best therapist that he's had. Brian has been to Shepherd Center, Kennedy Kreiger and now St. Josephs.

                          Roger
                          It seems like he has been to several good places by my understanding, as the places you mention are good, as I understand. But like with any centre of rehabilitating there are as many opinions as there are patients, I guess, although some have listings as CARF accredited etc. (one over here has). I was only to St. Josephs in Phoenix for one month after a surgery at the same hospital and then shipped home. But they all did a good job. Very nice staff, demanding therapists and so on. I also had rehab at a place over here, which are not a SCI unit, and that was not so good, limited on extensive rehab it was, more a place to “be”. But some of the other SCI units we have which I have visited later on due to some work I am involved with seems to have as good as standards as the one in the US I attended. But one thing I have been thinking about (have to think not to laud here in case some should see this from over here “smile”) is that one necessarily not wants a lot of SCI units for rehab, but more a few which can thereby give the best of care and rehabilitation thus having more patients gaining more expertise by. And like you write here, you guys also have been to several places (in you’re country), and today with easy to go by planes that should not be to big a problem. Over here we have three SCI rehab units, and I am thinking (again, not to laud) if it wouldn’t be better if we over here in my small country for instance just had one top-notch rehab place? Sorry, about this “rant” or thinking by me, but from a SCI patients point of view I think it is important to dear to think such thoughts regardless of what the established health care system would think or feel. Cause after all; it is us, the spinal cord injured and the next of kin who are the customers. – Good luck on further progress there. I liked the St. Josephs rehab centre in Phoenix a lot. The doc’s at St. Josephs (BNI) also made a huge difference for the outcome of the difficult lesion situated in my cord.

                          Comment


                            Lief

                            I agree with your conclusion. It's impossible to declare one place the best. When Brian was stable and we had to select where he would go for acute rehab I was lost. The reason that we didn't stay at St. Josephs was that the St. Josephs in-patient rehab was moving into a new facility and we didn't think that things were not going to be organized. When I say that they were moving I mean the weekend that we were deciding movers were putting furniture and boxes into the new rehab area. There was a lot of confusion. We felt uncomfortable about this so I got onto Carecure and asked the question where should Brian go for acute rehab. The recommendation was that it was critically important to go to a Model Hospital. Based on that we had two options: Craig Hospital in Denver and The Shepherd Center in Atlanta. Craig is closer to Phoenix so we were going to go there until I talked with Pat Rummerfield. He said that based on his experiences of interviewing over 200 patients that he had concluded that The Shepherd Center was the best place for acute rehab. That was it, we changed course and went to The Shepherd Center. All I wanted was the best possible acute rehab for my son. My wife and daughter flew with Brian on an air ambulance to Atlanta. They stayed with him in Atlanta from Mar 1 to July 15. I flew to Atlanta from Phoenix almost every Friday and flew back to Phoenix on Monday morning. I can't say that all of this was necessary but I would do it again in a heart beat because I still don't feel like I know enough about acute rehab to overrule people who deal with this everyday.

                            Roger
                            Last edited by Roger; 10 Feb 2008, 4:34 PM.

                            Comment


                              This has been a busy week for Brian. On Monday he had rehab at St. Josephs Hospital. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday he observed doctors at St. Josephs. This is all part of the clinical experience that he needs.

                              On Tuesday afternoon Brian called the UC Davis medical school to ask a few questions. He was very discouraged after talking to a rather rude man in the admissions depart.

                              The first question was: would UC Davis accept Brian's MCAT test results from August 2005 for an application for the Sept 2009 class. Normally the MCAT scores are only valid for three years. Brian was injured in Feb 2007 and has lost a year. Brian explained that he was injured and spent most of 2007 in the hospital. The man at the UC Davis admissions department said the they don't accept MCAT scores more that three years old and that there are no exceptions. The only way to be eligible to attend UC Davis is for Brian to retake the MCAT.

                              The second question was in regards to the physical requirements for attending medical school. UC Davis has a list of physical requirements posted on their INTERNET site. As stated on the website the requirements would preclude someone with Brian's injury from attending any University of California medical school because they all have exactly the same physical requirement. The man in the admissions department told Brian that if he didn't have finger sensitivity that he would not be eligible to attend medical school at UC Davis. Needless to say Brian was pretty discouraged.

                              I reminded Brian that there was a much different conclusion when we met with the director of admissions at the UC Irvine medical school. The lady at UC Irvine said that UC Irvine would accept his MCAT results and she also said that Brian was not blazing new ground. Other disabled students had already been accepted and had attended medical school. Brian is continuing to pursue his goal of attending medical school but obstacles keep appearing.


                              Roger

                              Comment


                                Sorry to hear Roger. Somehow that just doesnt seem fair. I hope he keeps trying.
                                T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

                                My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X