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  • Sweating

    What happens to the sweat glands after SCI? I thought I read somewhere that you stop sweatng or maybe just in certain areas. Also, I was reading the India bone marrow thread in cure and it said that one of the improvements was that the patients regained the ability to sweat.

  • #2
    my sweat glands below sensation level are on some days off some days....mostly off.....ass sweats so bad sometimes that i think i've had bladder spasm
    Last edited by justadildo; 05-24-2006, 07:20 PM.

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    • #3
      nada, sometimes a lil on the soles but if i don't shower i can smell, so that must mean some must! some persperation occurs
      Don't cry because it is over, smile because it happened

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      • #4
        I rarely sweat, I notice my legs get hot when i walk or do exercise. The only thing i notice sweating below my level of injury is right where the lower bicept starts. Makes walking in the heat quite dangerous!
        Injured:10-16-04
        C7/C8, T1 incomplete;


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        • #5
          I had a lot of sweating below my injury leval in the until about 10 months post. Any part that wasn't exposted to air would end un damp. (Bum in wheelchair, bottom of lower leg when lying on side, etc. Since Dec this seems to have disappeared, and I have very little sweating.
          T7-8 since Feb 2005

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          • #6
            I noticed hi sfeet were really sweaty the other day, but maybe it was just a fluke?.... Just something else for him to learn about with regard to SCI...

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            • #7
              For 26 years I never sweated below my injury, T-5. But just within the past couple of months my right thigh and upper leg has started to sweat. At this rate I'll be able to walk by the year 2134. Either I got a weird type of late "return" or it's attributable to the gabapentin (Neurontin) that I just started taking in February. Or for whatever reason???

              I don't like it because it makes transfering harder to do.... I now "stick" to the sheets when I pull myself up into bed. I transfer from the botton of the bed up..... not the side of it. Neither of my feet sweat so that's cool... no smelly sneakers.
              "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle." - Philo of Alexandria

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              • #8
                I'm a T5/T6 Complete and have always sweated below my injury point, especially at night. I also recently noticed I get goose pimples on my legs when I'm cold, or when I dry myself and get that fuzzy feeling that makes goose pimples come out. So his feet sweating is probably not a fluke, just watch a see.

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                • #9
                  For the first year I would sweat in my sleep, luckily that stopped. I also would sweat when stretching and if my bladder was full. Now I don't sweat at all, not one drop. On the bright side, I save money on deoderant since I don't sweat, my pits don't stink.
                  Learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make all of them yourself.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ChopperChick
                    What happens to the sweat glands after SCI? I thought I read somewhere that you stop sweatng or maybe just in certain areas. Also, I was reading the India bone marrow thread in cure and it said that one of the improvements was that the patients regained the ability to sweat.
                    Sweating is controlled by the sympathetic nervous system. The brain has temperature sensors in the hypothalamus, the spinal cord also appears to have temperature sensors (Source), and the skin of course has temperature sensors that affects sweating. So, when the spinal cord is injured, the temperature sensors in the brain cannot send signals to the body to sweat below the injury site. When the brain thinks that it is hot, the body above the injury site may sweat profusely. Note that the temperature sensors in the spinal cord or the skin can activate sweating responses and, in some cases, may be hyperactive. Autonomic dysreflexia may manifest in abnormal sweating responses in the body as well.

                    Wise.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wise Young
                      Sweating is controlled by the sympathetic nervous system. The brain has temperature sensors in the hypothalamus, the spinal cord also appears to have temperature sensors (Source), and the skin of course has temperature sensors that affects sweating. So, when the spinal cord is injured, the temperature sensors in the brain cannot send signals to the body to sweat below the injury site. When the brain thinks that it is hot, the body above the injury site may sweat profusely. Note that the temperature sensors in the spinal cord or the skin can activate sweating responses and, in some cases, may be hyperactive. Autonomic dysreflexia may manifest in abnormal sweating responses in the body as well.

                      Wise.
                      What does sweating normally below the injury site mean? if I can ask.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by IanTPoulter
                        What does sweating normally below the injury site mean? if I can ask.
                        It suggests that the sympathetic pathways in the spinal cord are intact. Wise.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Wise Young
                          It suggests that the sympathetic pathways in the spinal cord are intact. Wise.
                          Thank you.

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                          • #14
                            I dont sweat at all except on my head during AD. I have to be very careful on hot days.

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                            • #15
                              what would you say is too hot? this will be my first warm weather experience as tomorrow it could be 90F, i think that is ok in the shade with some iced tea. i am very eager to get a real w/c and tack on an unbrella, not so good on a windy day though. i need two ladies with palm branches.... ahhh..... day dreaming. but seriously, should i just wear less clothes and avoid the sun and keep hydrated and watch out for AD or wheel around my block five times fast in 95F.
                              Don't cry because it is over, smile because it happened

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