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  • few more questions...sorry!

    What does that mean if someone that has no movement can kinda feel someone stepping on thier foot? Is it just reflex? What about when they say thier arm feels like it is just sleeping? What if they think they can feel someone touching thier hand?

    Thanks

    #2
    hi tammy. is your friend saying she can feel during the doctors exam of sensation? i remember when i was first injured, that i would feel like i could still feel my legs and there definitely was (and still is) a sense of numbness, like my legs are asleep. i remember that i was absolutely sure that i could feel myself going to the bathroom, like i felt i really has to pee. i don't have sensation below my level of injury - c5/6, but it can be so difficult to differentiate what these feelings mean, especially early on. your friend may continue to regain sensation as she is still in a very acute stage(?).

    you have nothing to be sorry for. you are asking questions so you can help your friend. all of this is new to both you and her family and anything that may help in your understanding so you can share this information with your friends family, i'm sure is greatly appreciated. people here are also eager to share their experience and knowledge with others so feel free to ask as many questions as you need. no question is too trivial. [img]/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/img]

    Comment


      #3
      Parathesias (abnormal feelings not founded on actual stimulation) are not uncommon in SCI. It is also not uncommon for someone to get back actual feeling early, and this is a good sign. Can you touch her without her seeing where you are touching, and tell you accurately where you are touching her (without clues)?

      Also, Tammy, instead of starting a new thread for each question, it would be helpful to continue your previous thread with additional questions. This makes it easier for everyone to follow the progress of your friend and how the questions all relate to each other. The separate questions will eventually be separated and hard to find. Thanks.

      (KLD)
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

      Comment


      • #4
        When I want to ask a new question...do I just post a reply under my previous question?

        Comment


          #5
          Yep, just click 'reply' on this topic.

          You're being a great friend, and don't feel bad about asking questions - we've all been there! The learning curve for SCI is very high and very quick! Would be great if you could get your friend's family up on this site.

          Jackie

          _____________
          Tough times don't last - tough people do.
          _____________

          Comment


          • #6
            What is ASIA A, B, C, and D? Does the doctor grade each patient with one of these letters?

            Comment


            • #7
              Tammy,

              I commend your efforts and wish that I had a friend like you when I was injured.

              You can find an explanation of the ASIA classification by Dr. Wise Young here.

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              • #8
                My friend had no movement in her diaghram so they did surgery and gave her a permanant breathing tube. How does this work? Why do they have to clean it out often? Does it hurt when they clean it?

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                  #9
                  Tammy, a tracheostomy is done so that the person can use a ventilator long term. If the tube through the mouth or nose is left in long term, it can cause permanent damage to the vocal cords and throat, and can cause serious sinus infections. The tube is needed in order for her to use a ventilator. If her diaphragm does not work at all, this may be a long term need. If she should get return down the road, this tube can be removed and it will heal over.

                  Suctioning of lung secretions (mucous) is needed because she (probably) also has paralysis of her chest wall and stomach muscles, so she cannot cough on her own. If the secretions are not suctioned out, they accumulate and cause collapse of the lung and potentially life-threatening pneumonia. It is critical though that her nurses and respiratory therapists also work hard on finding ways to clear her secretions other than just suctioning, which is traumatic and can damage the lung. These technique should include "quad" or assisted coughing and the use of a Cough-Assist machine, usually combined with chest physical therapy and/or a vibrating vest to loosen the secretions first. Suctioning is quite uncomfortable, although usually not painful.

                  What is happening as far as getting her moved to a specialty SCI Center? With this information it is even more critical that this occurs. She needs to also be at a center where they can determine if she might be a candidate for a phrenic nerve pacer, or even for the newer diaphramatic stimulator that Christopher Reeve recently obtained. These are done only at specialized centers, and the sooner the better.

                  (KLD)
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A person from Craig Rehab was supposed to be there today to evaluate her. I don't think that they take her insurance...but isn't there some way she can still go? They really want to take her to Colorado...thier 2nd choice is somewhere in Georgia. Wouldn't the girl who caused the accident have to pay for her to go? When I was visiting yesterday with her, she kept making a face and she said she was coughing. How does that work when she has no movement in her diaphragm? She said she is coughing because she has pneumonia. The other day she had a 104 temp. but they got it down and she feels much better. Does anyone know if visitors are allowed at the rehab center? Would I be allowed to take her outside?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Yes it would be the insurance of the person who caused the accident that should be paying...at least that's how it worked with me. But they do put up a little bit of a fight, just like any other insurance company.

                      Don't piss me off or I'll run over your toes. [img]/forum/images/smilies/tongue.gif[/img]
                      "Legs are overrated. You can still get laid." - Kevin Girardi, "Joan of Arcadia"

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Sure you can visit her at rehab, and I hope you do! As far as taking her outside, I guess it will depend on how she feels. At first she will be dizzy when she tries to sit up, laying down w/ an sci gives you low blood pressure. We all went through this. Keep going, you're doing great...

                        C5/6 incomplete, injured Aug. 2000
                        Blog:
                        Does This Wheelchair Make My Ass Look Fat?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I was wondering...will my friend ever be able to eat real food? Will she ever be able to talk without using the button thing we put on her neck to hear vibrations? If no one is with her how will she turn on the T.V.? Will she ever be able to work again? Is there anything she will be able to do?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Tammy, I am glad to hear she is being evaluated by Craig...an excellent center. I am assuming the "back up" plan is for Shepherd Center in Atlanta...also an excellent choice.

                            I hope your friend is getting an attorney. Tell her NOT to sign or agree to any kind of insurance payout from the other driver's insurance without an attorney reviewing the settlement. I have seen many people gipped out of what they need by signing for a "big" settlement of $1-2 million, when they run through this kind of money in 1-2 years (for some) when ventilator dependent. She needs an attorney who will push the insurance company to pay NOW and also she probably will need to file a civil suit to get more than the car insurance medical coverage alone. Help her find a good personal injury attorney.

                            Most (but not all) people with this type of injury eventually can eat regular food, and can talk even when they have a trach and are on a ventilator. Christopher Reeve again is a good example. At Craig they will transition her to a portable wheelchair ventilator, teach her how to use an uncuffed trach, and do swallow training and evaluation.

                            For most people at her level of injury, an environmental control unit is ideal for use at home (or even in the hospital). An ECU will allow her to control all types of electronic equipment with voice, sip and puff, or microswitch control (such as a chin or tongue switch). Even the most basic ECU will control the hospital bed head up and down, turn on/off a TV and change channels, turn on/off a radio or fan, etc. Some have enough channels that you can lock/unlock the front door to let your PCA in, operate power drapes, run a computer, etc. etc. They are not cheap, and if her insurance balks at purchasing, an ECU is a perfect item to target for fund raising by her friends and family. If you are considering this, just be sure that the money is handled in such a way that it does not make her loose any benefits she is entitled to. One resource for this is here:

                            http://www.transplantfund.org/

                            She will be able to have visitors in rehab. Be sure that your visits do not interfere with her therapy schedule though. Check with the center about the best times to visit where you can accompany her to therapy, or where she will have free time. She should be allowed to go outdoors (most have patios, etc.) when the weather is fair, and will also be going on recreation outings with the therapeutic recreation staff. Find out if you can accompany her on these outings, but be sure to follow the therapists direction so you don't do too much for her...she needs to get out into the community and start to learn how to manage things like asking strangers for assistance, etc.

                            There are many things she will be able to do, but probably little of them will involve taking care of herself. She will need to become an expert on how to maintain her health and how to direct others in her care. It is unlikely that she will be able to drive, at least not with current technology. She will be able to use a computer with voice recognition. She may be able to paint or draw if this interests her. People with her injury do work, esp. if they have the education to do a job like social worker, psychologist, teacher, attorney, computer specialist, etc. etc. I have a friend with a similar injury who has a double major from a prestigeous university (he was injured at 16 and is now 40) and he owns his own business making computer accessories. Options are limited only by imagination and effort for these types of jobs.

                            Of course all of this assumes no further motor return, and it is too early to say yet.

                            (KLD)
                            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I was wondering how could I go about doing a fundraiser. Does anyone have any ideas? Also, I was reading an article and it said that usually injuries about a C3 have to use a ventilator for the rest of thier lives. Is that right? How many times a day does the trach have to be cleaned? Is that true that when they clean it out that the person cant breathe? It has now been 18 days since the accident and no movement. Does that mean my friend is complete? Does anyone know any statistics for C2 injuries?

                              Thanks!

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