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Compressed Cord at C3/C4 Mid July - Everything Moves!

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  • Compressed Cord at C3/C4 Mid July - Everything Moves!

    Hello all, I'm from London UK and came across this site whilst searching for all aspects of SCI. We're only about 10 miles from the Olympics and it's a great time to be in London - the Paralympics will have a new dimension this year. Like a lot a people on this site, we're looking for answers/experiences of others that have gone through such trauma. We also appreciate there are no definitives regarding recovery rates or ultimate outcomes. Our son of 29 suffered a sports injury whilst playing five-a-side soccer. He slipped badly onto his back/neck and suffered a slipped disc that went into and compressed his SC between C3 & C4. It was an incomplete injury and this happened on the 18th July. Thereafter, on the 20th July, he had anterior access surgery to remove the disc and a spinal fusion procedure, the surgeon said the cord re-inflated satisfactorily. After the op, he found it difficult to move anything and when he tried there was a lot of discomfort. What movment there was came from his feet and wrists. After a couple of days he could lift his forearms a little, flex his wrists and move his fingers. With regard to his legs, he could lift them a little against gravity and move his feet/toes. It is now only the 4th August and he has complete and co-ordinated muscle and limb movement/range throughout his body (except regaining all his bladder and bowel sensation/control) and he can lift himself up and take himself unaided from his bed into his wheelchair without the use of a bananaboard in two movements. He has only just started re-hab and can stand (albeit a little unsteady) lift dumbells plus, whilst siting, lift and flex his legs with weights attached to his ankles. What he's currently lacking is consistant levels of sensory feedback throughout his body, his lower limbs more than others (he say's that his legs feel somewhat disimbodied when he stands, hence the weakness). Aside from the lack of bowel and bladder sensation he say's the rest of his body feels pretty good. All the family have been praying for him and for the best, and appreciate that after all our research that things take time, however, bearing in mind the speed and my description of his recovery thus far, my question is a very typical one -- what are his chances of a full recovery ??

    Thank you all so much ... Dale.
    Last edited by DaleMinton; 08-05-2012, 05:44 PM.

  • #2
    Only time will tell. Some people actually do get everything back, although that usually occurs fairly quickly. It is impossible to tell how much he will get back at this point.

    Can you get your son to join our community?

    I have asked Dr. Young to comment when he has time.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    Comment


    • #3
      I am not a doctor but I can tell you that from what I've seen it is looking good for him. With SCI basically the faster return happens the more chance of near full recovery you have, the first 3 months being of great significance of things to come.

      There are some cases where people recover well even after 6-12 of full paralysis but these are less frequent.

      Originally posted by DaleMinton View Post
      Hello all, I'm from London UK and came across this site whilst searching for all aspects of SCI. We're only about 10 miles from the Olympics and it's a great time to be in London - the Paralympics will have a new dimension this year. Like a lot a people on this site, we're looking for answers/experiences of others that have gone through such trauma. We also appreciate there are no definitives regarding recovery rates or ultimate outcomes. Our son of 29 suffered a sports injury whilst playing five-a-side soccer. He slipped badly onto his back/neck and suffered a slipped disc that went into and compressed his SC between C3 & C4. It was an incomplete injury and this happened on the 18th July. Thereafter, on the 20th July, he had anterior access surgery to remove the disc and a spinal fusion procedure, the surgeon said the cord re-inflated satisfactorily. After the op, he found it difficult to move anything and when he tried there was a lot of discomfort. What movment there was came from his feet and wrists. After a couple of days he could lift his forearms a little, flex his wrists and move his fingers. With regard to his legs, he could lift them a little against gravity and move his feet/toes. It is now only the 4th August and he has complete and co-ordinated muscle and limb movement/range throughout his body (except regaining all his bladder and bowel sensation/control) and he can lift himself up and take himself unaided from his bed into his wheelchair on a bananaboard in two movements. He has only just started re-hab and can stand (albeit a little unsteady) lift dumbells plus, whilst siting, lift and flex his legs with weights attached to his ankles. What he's currently lacking is consistant levels of sensory feedback throughout his body, his lower limbs more than others (he say's that his legs feel somewhat disimbodied when he stands, hence the weakness). Aside from the lack of bowel and bladder sensation he say's the rest of his body feels pretty good. All the family have been praying for him and for the best, and appreciate that after all our research that things take time, however, bearing in mind the speed and my description of his recovery thus far, my question is a very typical one -- what are his chances of a full recovery ??

      Thank you all so much ... Dale.

      Comment


      • #4
        ... generally Bowel & bladder can take longer, if there is progress you will have to wait 18-24 months to see more or less what it will be (it can take up to a few years in some cases)

        You are new to the SCI world , so I think you will find out this world is full of mysteries and unknowns. Nobody will want to comit himself onto a prognosis because little is know about the spinal cord and its recovery from injury (and its non-recovery also).

        But it seems like you got relatively lucky with this pace of recovery, doctors will confirm it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you for your replies, you're all so kind and your comments are very comforting and encouraging, we also acknowledge there can be no definitives. Your comments regarding his bowel and bladder function were very much of interest in as much as if some or all recovery prevails that it can take many months. We'll continue to hope that his recovery to date continues.

          We'd be very interested in a comment from Dr Young and we send our thanks in advance.

          Dale and Diane.
          Last edited by DaleMinton; 08-05-2012, 02:54 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Advice Please -Leg Tremor after Spinal Contusion.

            Hello again. My son is recovering from a sporting accident where he had a herniated disc resulting in a compressed cord. This was released by surgery. Forunately (very) he currently seems to be on a road to recovery. Now, after only 3 weeks, he has all his limb movement back plus his bowel and bladder movements are improving. He can now stand up quite easily without assistance and with support can walk several several steps, but as expected it feels all very unsteady because his legs feel weak and somewhat disconnected. My question is this:- When he is sitting in his chair with his feet on the foot plates, if he lifts his right leg to a particular position (with his toes still on the plate) his leg will start to tremor and continue to do so until the leg position is moved. Can someone advise me what causes this and is it a condition that can/will subside.

            Thanks Dale.
            Last edited by DaleMinton; 08-09-2012, 08:09 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree. This does not sound like tremor. It sounds like a type of spasm called "clonus". It is especially triggered by pushing up or pressure on the ball of the foot, often with the knee and hip flexed (sitting in a chair), and usually calmed by pressure down on the knee, which stretches the heel cord and inhibits the spasm.

              Here is a pretty good video showing clonus (in a person with MS, not SCI, but it is the same): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUOwuxiI5Gw

              Stretching, standing, ROM exercises, and laying on his stomach are good ways to also inhibit spasm. If they are interfering with function, or a safety problem, then medications (baclofen, tizanadine, etc.) may be used to tone the spasms down somewhat.

              (I took the liberty of moving this to your original thread. It makes it easier to follow the progress of the person and keep track of their basic injury information, etc. Hope that is OK.)

              (KLD)
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thank you for your replies, that's enlightning and encouraging. I looked at the youTube video and it's certainly similar, but of a slower frequency. In addition, he certainly doesn't have to manually push down on his knee to make it stop. Exerting downward pressure through the ball of his foot, he just has to higher his leg (thigh) or little or lower it and it disappears (any comments on that will be eagerly read). I understand that we'll have to wait and see how this develops anyway.

                Lastly, I didn't mind at all that you moved the thread, it made sense to do so and thanks.

                Dale.
                Last edited by DaleMinton; 08-10-2012, 03:23 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by smashms
                  sounds all very normal this is called spasm he is only 3 weeks out still very early in the injury, with therapy this may get better as his legs get stronger however it may not. it is good that he can stand on hi own and walk even a few steps. is he going to a inpatient rehab or going thru outpatient rehab? also sounds like e has some nerve damage however this may just be cord swelling also. things should get better in the coming weeks or months.
                  -----------------------------------------------------------------------

                  Thanks for your comments. He is still going through inpatient re-hab. So far he's had about 6 physio sessions and 2 excursions to the pool. Although he can only take a number of unsteady steps once he stands up from his wheel chair (and he gets up from the chair to standing easily in one go), yesterday he walked unaided from one side of the pool to the other on only his 2nd visit there!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DaleMinton View Post
                    Hello all, I'm from London UK and came across this site whilst searching for all aspects of SCI. We're only about 10 miles from the Olympics and it's a great time to be in London - the Paralympics will have a new dimension this year. Like a lot a people on this site, we're looking for answers/experiences of others that have gone through such trauma. We also appreciate there are no definitives regarding recovery rates or ultimate outcomes. Our son of 29 suffered a sports injury whilst playing five-a-side soccer. He slipped badly onto his back/neck and suffered a slipped disc that went into and compressed his SC between C3 & C4. It was an incomplete injury and this happened on the 18th July. Thereafter, on the 20th July, he had anterior access surgery to remove the disc and a spinal fusion procedure, the surgeon said the cord re-inflated satisfactorily. After the op, he found it difficult to move anything and when he tried there was a lot of discomfort. What movment there was came from his feet and wrists. After a couple of days he could lift his forearms a little, flex his wrists and move his fingers. With regard to his legs, he could lift them a little against gravity and move his feet/toes. It is now only the 4th August and he has complete and co-ordinated muscle and limb movement/range throughout his body (except regaining all his bladder and bowel sensation/control) and he can lift himself up and take himself unaided from his bed into his wheelchair without the use of a bananaboard in two movements. He has only just started re-hab and can stand (albeit a little unsteady) lift dumbells plus, whilst siting, lift and flex his legs with weights attached to his ankles. What he's currently lacking is consistant levels of sensory feedback throughout his body, his lower limbs more than others (he say's that his legs feel somewhat disimbodied when he stands, hence the weakness). Aside from the lack of bowel and bladder sensation he say's the rest of his body feels pretty good. All the family have been praying for him and for the best, and appreciate that after all our research that things take time, however, bearing in mind the speed and my description of his recovery thus far, my question is a very typical one -- what are his chances of a full recovery ??

                    Thank you all so much ... Dale.
                    Dale,

                    Your son should continue to recover substantially over the coming year, including his bladder and bowel sensation. A year from now, although he may look completely recovered, he will probably tell you that he is not 100% and that his coordination, agility, and strength is not the same. But, he is a lucky man.

                    Wise.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Your son seems to be making terrific progress and I hope he continues to do so. This type of injury is very scary and I completely understand the need to know what the future will bring. SCI recovery will take it's own time, though. In the meantime, your son is fortunate to be able to stand and take a few steps. I always think that if there's even a glimmer of motion, it's a starting point. He was probably an athletic person before his injury and that will help him, too.

                      Make the absolute most of everything the physios teach him. He should work as hard as he can...harder than he's ever worked at anything before.

                      Help him to set steady and small goals for improvement. Keep a log of his exercises and the changes that they bring. Even though time can crawl after such an injury, after awhile, you may be glad to have a diary of recovery to refer to...and remember the days when he wasn't able to do as much. Set small goals and celebrate when they are met.

                      I approached my recovery like a project manager, because that's what I do. It helped tremendously to be organized and systematic and to have records to refer to. It was a huge psychological boost ... and at the end of the day, the psychological aspect may be the hardest to handle.

                      From the heart, I wish a full recovery for your son. Please let us know how he does....better yet, have him tell us.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Wise Young View Post
                        Dale,

                        Your son should continue to recover substantially over the coming year, including his bladder and bowel sensation. A year from now, although he may look completely recovered, he will probably tell you that he is not 100% and that his coordination, agility, and strength is not the same. But, he is a lucky man.

                        Wise.


                        Thank you Wise for taking interest and your time to contribute to this, your comments are very comforting and encouraging. Dale.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not to provide false hope here but my roommate in rehab was admitted within a week of injury as a C7 who could feel everything and only wiggle his big toe (I was a complete C7 a little over three months post SCI). He could move everything within a month and was using a walker at the two month point. He walked out of rehab barely using a cane at three months. I lost track of him after 9 months but he pretty much fully recovered.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by truly View Post
                            Your son seems to be making terrific progress and I hope he continues to do so. This type of injury is very scary and I completely understand the need to know what the future will bring. SCI recovery will take it's own time, though. In the meantime, your son is fortunate to be able to stand and take a few steps. I always think that if there's even a glimmer of motion, it's a starting point. He was probably an athletic person before his injury and that will help him, too.

                            Make the absolute most of everything the physios teach him. He should work as hard as he can...harder than he's ever worked at anything before.

                            Help him to set steady and small goals for improvement. Keep a log of his exercises and the changes that they bring. Even though time can crawl after such an injury, after awhile, you may be glad to have a diary of recovery to refer to...and remember the days when he wasn't able to do as much. Set small goals and celebrate when they are met.

                            I approached my recovery like a project manager, because that's what I do. It helped tremendously to be organized and systematic and to have records to refer to. It was a huge psychological boost ... and at the end of the day, the psychological aspect may be the hardest to handle.

                            From the heart, I wish a full recovery for your son. Please let us know how he does....better yet, have him tell us.

                            Hi Truly. He is indeed a fit guy of only 29, athletic and healthy.Your words are indeed inspirational and very helpful. I will be showing all these wonderful posts to Ian so he continues to be of a positive spirit and motivated. I of course wish you all the very best and love with regard to your own endeavours and wellbeing. We'll speak again and have a good weekend in the US of A.
                            Last edited by DaleMinton; 08-10-2012, 05:22 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Patton57 View Post
                              Not to provide false hope here but my roommate in rehab was admitted within a week of injury as a C7 who could feel everything and only wiggle his big toe (I was a complete C7 a little over three months post SCI). He could move everything within a month and was using a walker at the two month point. He walked out of rehab barely using a cane at three months. I lost track of him after 9 months but he pretty much fully recovered.

                              Hi Patton. He needs all the inspiration he can get, and your reply, along with others, will continue his belief that there is hope and he can beat this. My thoughts are with you and I pray for you all - don't loose faith.

                              Dale.

                              Comment

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