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Going Home Thursday! Advice?

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  • Going Home Thursday! Advice?

    Good Morning Everyone

    So after 3 long months I'm finally going to get to leave rehab and go home! I've never been so scared/excited in my life. I'll take any advice anyone has on going home! I'll be going home to my own house with my husband and three roommates.

    Thanks for any advice you can offer!

    ~Sam T-11

  • #2
    Hi Sam. My level is similar to yours (t12 for 3 years). I suggest keeping a journal and make sure to write down everything you're greatful for in each day. And when you think twice about a transfer or doing something you loved pre injury because it seems like too much work, push yourself to do it anyways. You re a survivor and you have within you or will be given everything you need to succeed.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sam.I.Am View Post
      Good Morning Everyone

      So after 3 long months I'm finally going to get to leave rehab and go home! I've never been so scared/excited in my life. I'll take any advice anyone has on going home! I'll be going home to my own house with my husband and three roommates.

      Thanks for any advice you can offer!

      ~Sam T-11
      I too am close at T12 and can't do math LOL This is my 23rd year since my injury. I posted for several days thinking it was 24 but oh well....

      I know you are scared and rightfully so. This is your biggest challenge but it won't be your only challenge. One of my favorite children's books was teh "little engine that could". In the early days of my injury in the late 80's, I did not have the support that you now have here. I always chanted in my mind, "I think I can" until it became "I did it".

      You have to know that you have limitations take care of your body. Pushing to much can be dangerous for your body while not pushing enough can be dangerous for your mind.

      Good luck in your continued recovery and know you are not alone.
      T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

      My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

      Comment


      • #4
        Take things one at a time...there's going to be a lot going on when you get home, and a lot to adjust to. Decide what is most important, and tackle those things first. Also, try to be realistic in your early goals. For example, when my husband first got home, he still had another 4-5 weeks in a TLSO brace, so it wasn't possible for him to shower by himself...so we pushed that goal off for a while.

        Keep a journal for everything...especially liquid intake/cathing/bowel schedule/etc. We did this all pretty religiously for the first 3-4 months, so that he had a good idea of what foods/drinks yielded more output and things like that.

        Get outside, or at least out of your house, and for non-medical things. You'll have a lot of doctor's appointments...try to also get out to a local park/mall/restaurant.

        Best of luck to you!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Sam.I.Am View Post
          Good Morning Everyone

          So after 3 long months I'm finally going to get to leave rehab and go home! I've never been so scared/excited in my life. I'll take any advice anyone has on going home! I'll be going home to my own house with my husband and three roommates.

          Thanks for any advice you can offer!

          ~Sam T-11

          Hi Sam,

          When I first went home, it was a big adjustment. At the hospital, I had plenty of room and someone was almost always there; be it roommates, nurses or visitors. When I got home, it was me and my mother. I was home for a couple of weeks and boy was it an adjustment. After going through rehab (like you), going home was much easier. It's scary at first but very quickly you will become comfortable.

          Good luck and enjoy your new life. It's not as bad as it appears.
          Millard
          ''Life's tough... it's even tougher if you're stupid!'' -- John Wayne

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks so much everyone! I love the journal idea! I still have another 2 weeks in the turtle shell so I know I will be extremely limited already. I think I'm going to sit down and make a list of goals and dates I want to accomplish it by. Reading all the stuff on here is giving me a pretty decent idea of what to expect Goal number one, sit in grass at the park and watch the lake! I miss outside

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            • #7
              Make sure you have all the supplies you will need ready and waiting for you at home. You have had all of this at your finger tips and for the asking in the rehabilitation setting. Now you will need to have everything you have been using at home in locations that you can easily access.

              Look at a 48 hour period and start making a list of everything you use, catheters, lubricant, antiseptic wipes, bowel care supplies etc. Will you go home from rehab with adequate supplies or do you need to order some supplies?

              Prepare a list of durable medical equipments suppliers, doctors, therapists, etc. so that these important contacts are all in one place and easy for you to find.

              Welcome Home.

              All the best,
              GJ

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              • #8
                Write down all contact information and names and phone numbers and appointments.
                CWO
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                • #9
                  emergency numbers, let the local fire department know that you are in a wheelchair
                  inventory list of supplies. remove extra furniture that might be in your way, check width of door ways versus width of chair you may have to remove doors or moulding, move things that you use alot to a height you can reach, move your clothes into lower dresser drawers, lower the bar in your closet that your clothes hang on
                  Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

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                  • #10
                    Just do your best to enjoy and know that for as much as you have learned to do things differently you have much much more to learn. You can figure out how to do just about anything a lot will be figuring out what is just to time consuming even if you "can" do it that does not mean it is a good idea to spend that much time doing it. I know I can pretty much get just about anything done but there are things I get/let other people to do because it is just not a good use of my time. Once you get the shell off get physical, explore the gym and as soon as you can check out handcycling since you like the out doors

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sam.I.Am View Post
                      Thanks so much everyone! I love the journal idea! I still have another 2 weeks in the turtle shell so I know I will be extremely limited already. I think I'm going to sit down and make a list of goals and dates I want to accomplish it by. Reading all the stuff on here is giving me a pretty decent idea of what to expect Goal number one, sit in grass at the park and watch the lake! I miss outside
                      Sit your ass on a cushion in the grass. :-)

                      NEVER be too hard on yourself the first few months. Looking at cabinets you were able to get with ease, the piano you played is trying (examples).

                      You may also encounter extra guests that come and visit that didn't see you in rehab. That'll fade too as you begin to navigate your Brave New World! Good luck!
                      Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

                      I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

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                      • #12
                        Don't consider the turtle shell as "limiting". There are many things you can do to get stronger with the turtle shell on. I suggest you get some small weights and work with them to get your core strength built up. Anything you can do to raise your heart rate will make the transistion from bed to sitting up in wheelchair longer, easier. Working with raising arms above your head helps also. Hopefully, they showed you plenty of exercises to do in rehab. One of my favorites was holding a weight with arms extended in front of body. I remeber the days when I could barely hold the weight away from my chest without falling over, good times.

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                        • #13
                          Get your house accessible. When I first got home, we didn't have ramps at the doors and I required help getting into and out of the house. Felt like a prisoner before we got ramps installed (actually I did the installation).

                          Get a vehicle you can drive. You need to get your independence back.

                          It is scary going home but once you get it set up you will find it very comfortable.
                          TM 2004 T12 incomplete

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                          • #14
                            Keep stretching your legs often, daily if you can. Lie on your stomach once a day to keep your hipflexors in the front from shortening too. You don't want muscles so tight that you're literally stuck in a sitting position!
                            Aerodynamically, the bumble bee shouldn't be able to fly, but the bumble bee doesn't know that, so it goes on flying anyways--Mary Kay Ash

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                            • #15
                              So much good advice here.

                              Don't leave rehab without a follow-up appointment with your SCI physiatrist, a follow-up appointment with your primary care doctor (time to get one if you didn't have one!) and a follow-up appointment with a urologist familiar with SCI.

                              Don't leave rehab without a clear plan for when rehab (as outpatient?) will start, and find out if you are allowed to return more more inpatient rehab for more rehab once your turtle shell comes off.

                              Don't leave rehab without all of your Durable Medical Equipment ordered (eg. shower bench, ?raised toilet seat, wheelchair). Make a list of all the other stuff you need (caths, wipes etc..) and hopefully the nurses will give you a bunch of "left over" free stuff to tide you over for a few days.

                              Don't leave rehab without the name, phone number of the medical supplier who will start mailing you your monthly bladder/bowel supplies. Make sure the initial order has been placed for supplies and you know the approximate arrival date. Find out which doctor has been named as the "ordering doctor". That will change to your outpatient physiatrist most likely, in the future.

                              Ask where the closest place is to you that you can BUY catheters, if by chances the deliveries get delayed, or you ever run out.

                              Totally agree with keeping a "little black book" of everything you drink, eat, when you cath and volumes you get and maybe some details on your bowels. This is so very helpful to figure out what works and what doesn't.

                              Come back here with all the questions you have once you get home.

                              I totally agree with getting outside and see your friends/family and do things you enjoy as much as possible. Recovery is a long road and a lot of work, so reward yourself.... and don't isolate yourself.

                              Good luck!

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