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Why do they do it?

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  • #16
    don't think my doctors aid anything to me about prognosis and I did not ask.

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    • #17
      While in hospital I was diagnosed & "seen " via Internet for my spinal injuries by doctor in a larger city due to out rural hospital, while my broken pelvis was treated inhouse I was told my spinal injuries were stable & i would bounce back, would walk out hospital and have NO lasting issues, That was 11 months ago 2 months ago i became so frustrated & blamed myself because I wet myself AGAIN, could not regain strength on my left side, the PT told me "that's just how its going to be get used to it " I gave up, became depressed & I just recently pulled myself out of my funk vowing not to let all the pain etc. To beat me!! I believe saying every injury is different might have made me feel better

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      • #18
        My Doctor at Craig after he saw my x-rays knew I'd never walk again, 4 crushed vertabraes, a complete T8. He didn't want to completely deflate me so he said up to two years things can improve. Personally if he'd told me I'd never walk and I did, the least important thing in the world to me would be I proved him, or anyone else wrong. These rehab docs have a tough job, no med students I know want to be one.

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        • #19
          I was told that I would never walk again in the ER at Shock Trauma. It hit my family and me pretty hard, but after the initial shock of hearing those words, I set out to defy them. Boy was I naive. I have since regained the ability to walk with crutches, but my attitude had nothing to do with my funtional return. If it hadn't been in the cards for me my attitude wouldn't have changed that. Sure my attitude helped me struggle to maximize my return and I have worked my ass off, but that has nothing to with my nerves.
          In rehab they were more stoic and were always deflecting walk talk. We'll have to wait and see was their mantra. Maybe these doctors know that the vast majority of us will be sent home with our spinal cord injury handbook, some cathetors, and maybe a prescription for viagra and little else. They know that rehab for us is woefully inadequate and the top nuero recovery places have year long waiting lists. So unless you are rich or have cadillac insurance' we will have to go it alone.
          The crazy thing is that we do it everyday. We walk and prove them wrong all the time. Most of us on our own. If you are lucky enough to get return; don't be angry. You should be stoked.
          Besides, what my surgeon lacked in bedside manner, he more than made uop for with his knife skills.

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          • #20
            I don't want to speak for surgeons out there because I am not sure how they all think, but the "prognosis talk" is probably based solely on what they know they have control over in the operating room and what they have seen as a result.

            The nervous system is very complex and when a spinal cord or nerves are injured, bruised or damaged partially or completely, the nerves are in charge of how they restore themselves or not. I have spent the past 12 years caring for spinal cord injured people to live with a spinal cord injury. Many people come with a lot of hope out of rehab - which is great - but they miss the teaching on how to live with a SCI. I have seen two people make full recoveries following a SCI in the past 12 years. They were so happy to have proved the doctors wrong. We tell our patients that after a SCI it can take up to one year to see improvement in function or sensation. I don't think that is cruel. Everyone needs to have hope to make it to the next day for the future.

            pbr
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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            • #21
              This is my opinion.
              In this sue crazy society in the US. If a doctor tells you, you will get better and you don't you might sue them. No body is going to sue if you say you won't get better and you do.
              Doctors have huge egos. So when they give you the worst diagnosis and you exceed it, they can say: Look how good a doctor I am. Its tough on that ego, if they say, you will be fine and you don't.

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              • #22
                BFD- I believe that you definitely have a point. For some reason this is a topic that I have given a lot of thought. I have gone through the why are they so pessimistic? I thnk SCI nurse has a point in that it is important no matter our recovery to come to grips with our new condition. It certainly was with me. All the while I was getting return I was embracing life in a chair. Being able to kick my legs 2 inches was exciting but I had to prepare for the worst. Rehab helped me with that. Not while I was there, but months later when I finally got their mission.

                No matter what return I ultimately achieve; as the nurse suggests, it is so rare to recover fully. Though I am not sure (in the broader sci community) her experience represents a big enough sample to draw confident conclusions; her point is correct. Regardless of return, we will need to start living our lives differently and in some strange way, giving us the worst prognosis may encourage this. I can only speak for myself. I never believed that I wouldn't walk again. But the attitude of the rehab center had to the opposite. They have to operate on the assumption that we are going to face a life of challenge and prepare us for that because it will be for us no matter what.

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