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    Are there percentages of recovery from spinal cord shock? In other words, do ___% of kids that suffer from spinal cord shock as a result of spinal cord concussion return to normal? We believe that our youngster (14) has no broken bones and that the spinal cord was not damaged but 6 days out he does not have use of his legs.
    Last edited by Football Coach; 09-01-2009, 11:19 AM.

  • #2
    Each injury is so unique.
    Where is this youngster? What kind of care does this youngster receive?

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    • #3
      I am not sure that your question is clear. Spinal shock is the period of loss of reflexes that follows spinal cord injury (damage). Spinal concussion is a non-technical term used to describe temporary paralysis that lasts only a few hours or a day or two after trauma. Improvement starts almost immediately with a spinal cord concussion. If this young person is now 6 days post injury and has no return of function, it is likely they have much more than a spinal cord concussion and may have some significant residual paralysis.

      It is not necessary to have spinal fractures or dislocations to have significant damage to the spinal cord. This is actually more common in children and adolescents than it is in adults and even has a syndrome named for it (spinal cord injury without radiologic abnormality = SCIWORA).

      Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormality (SCIWORA)
      SCIWORA is defined as the occurrence of a spinal cord injury despite normal plain radiographic studies. In addition, flexion/extension films of the cervical spine and CT scans are also normal. There are wide differences in the reporting of SCIWORA and its incidence ranges from 5% and 70% of all pediatric spinal cord injuries, depending on the study examined. A true incidence is probably close to 20% of all pediatric spinal cord injuries. SCIWORA occurs almost exclusively among younger children and 2/3 of the cases occur in patients 8 years or younger. SCIWORA is very uncommon in adolescents and rare among adults. Cervical and thoracic spinal levels are injured with almost equal frequency and lumbar levels are rarely involved. There are important differences in SCIWORA injury patterns between younger age groups (0 to 8 years) and older children (9 to 16 years). Younger patients account for 2/3 of all SCIWORA injuries and have a higher porportion of complete neurological injuries. Adolescents show a far less frequent incidence of complete spinal cord injury due to SCIWORA. Upper cervical spine injuries typically involve young children more than adolescents. Due to insufficient data regarding injury patterns, it is difficult to make other general statements regarding the completeness of SCIWORA injuries or injury level. Further experience and information is necessary for this analysis.
      Source

      While spinal shock (period of no reflexes) continues, it is not possible to determine the true extent of the spinal cord injury. Once reflexes (usually the bulbocavernosus reflex first) start to return, a repeat of the ASIA exam and monitoring for any return is critical.

      Did this young man get methylpredisilone immediately upon injury? Where is he now? Is he being moved to a major SCI center soon?

      (KLD)
      Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 09-01-2009, 11:52 AM.
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      • #4
        He is in the hospital (has been for the past 6 days since injury). They are trying to get him into a rehab center. He is slowly re-gaining use of his arms. He has gone from using him thumb laying on top of the TV remote to playing video games. He is wiggling his toes. When he tries to lift his knee from a special chair he only gets a muscle twitch on top of his knee. He is 14. I am brand new to this but the family is not getting much information from the doctors although I think he is in an excellent hospital. We are just anxious to see movement return to his legs and I am trying to determine what the odds are that he will or won't return to normal.

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        • #5
          Bless you & your family at this confusing time. Read & search this site for answers. Please please don't say "normal" like Spinal Cord Injury makes anyone not normal. You are still in the shock please choose your words carefully. I am happy you found this site so soon.
          No one can comfort this event....but you will find information to help you & your Son here.

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          • #6
            Did not mean to use the word normal incorrectly. Just trying to gather information as to the odds of recovery.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Football Coach View Post
              Did not mean to use the word normal incorrectly. Just trying to gather information as to the odds of recovery.
              You ae in a good place for important information and to be able to ask quesions.

              Can you get his parents access to this site?

              If you could go back and answer the SCI-Nurse questions from above, it will help them try and point you and the young man's family in the right directions.

              As for odds ... each case is a one to one recovery and treatment scenario.

              Hang in there and if you can keep checking in here often you and the others involved will find much here.

              The SCI-Nurse team will do their best to assist you.

              William

              ... rolling since 1989
              ...

              BE NICE!It's free

              P.S. ~ I have "handicapabilities"

              TWITTER: @MacBerry

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              • #8
                Does he have bowel & bladder function?

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                • #9
                  What is the name of the rehab center that they are trying to get him into?

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                  • #10
                    Coach,

                    The above advise is very good. Knowledge is good medicine for the parents and friends. They will be faced with many decisions and having some understanding helps. This site is very good at that. The family and young man will need much support for awhile. You can help greatly by keeping the team posted on his condition. I have some experience with this. I was injured (SCI)playing high school football at 14yrs. That was almost 30 yrs ago and my paralysis was instant and complete. Pretty much has stayed the same, but ever case is different. It sounds like he has some encouraging movement in hands and toes, so I will be hoping for the best on my end. I wish my family could have had access to this site 30yrs ago. Good people.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Football Coach View Post
                      Are there percentages of recovery from spinal cord shock? In other words, do ___% of kids that suffer from spinal cord shock as a result of spinal cord concussion return to normal? We believe that our youngster (14) has no broken bones and that the spinal cord was not damaged but 6 days out he does not have use of his legs.
                      Football coach,

                      Your youngster is likely to have spinal cord injury. Temporary paralysis from concussion of the spinal cord typically recovers in a few minutes, rarely more than a hour or two. Anything longer is indicative of spinal cord injury. If he has any function below the injury site, particularly if he has anal sensation and or voluntary anal sphincter contraction, this suggests that he has a good chance of recovering walking. About 30% of people who have sensory preservations below the injury site will recover walking over a period of many months. Over 90% of people who have sensory and motor preservation below the injury site will recover walking over a year or more.

                      I am not sure what you mean by "use of the legs". Is he able to move the legs, even slightly? If so, the likelihood of recovery is good. In any case, it sounds like a significant spinal cord injury. He will require rehabilitation and a lot of hard work to recover as much as he can. It is important that the impact of his injury on his education be minimized as much as possible. He needs to go back to school as soon as possible.

                      Wise.

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