Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help for my Dad - C5 complete

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #46
    So my dad's been in his new place for a few days now and it's been wonderful. They really seem to know what they're doing! My dad is already talking (I spoke to him over the phone for the first time yesterday) and he's even eating regular food. The only thing he can't stand is the new way they suction him. I can't remember what my sister said it was called, but she said the tube is much bigger (in diameter) and he truly hates it. He says it's painful and he's even had nightmares about it. Poor guy. Does anyone know what this is called? I want to say that it starts with a C. Thanks!

    Comment


      #47
      Perhaps they are not suctioning him, but instead using a machine called a Cough-Assist (Cough-allator, inexsufflator). It takes some getting used to but is actually safer than suctioning as it pulls air and secretions out by vacuum instead of sticking a catheter down inside the trachea, which can not only cause infections but can damage the cilia and increase secretion production. We use these a lot in most large SCI centers for people with trachs.

      (KLD)
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

      Comment


        #48
        Indeed it is a CoughAssist machine and I happen to love mine. In my opinion, it's a large reason why I haven't been hospitalized with any respiratory infections ever since I left rehab about 11.5 years ago. But a friend of mine prefers suctioning to the CoughAssist. No worries; to each their own.

        I'm just glad your Dad is talking and doing much better--great to hear!
        Wheelchair users -- even high-level quads... WANNA BOWL?

        I'm a C1-2 with a legit 255 high bowling game.

        Comment


          #49
          I just found out today that my dad has a stage 4 ulcer. I'm so devastated - not just that he has the ulcer, but because all this time I thought it was a stage 2 ulcer and my aunt was apparently in denial about it and didn't tell me. I'm so frustrated I'm shaking!!! They did a bone scan on Monday and I have a call in to his doctor to talk about it. Will this heal? What questions should I ask? What can I do from so far away? (I'm in SC but my dad is in OH, closer to more family)

          Comment


            #50
            It's amazing how on top of everything you are. This road is rough to say the least, but you have tons of help here and kinds words too. My dad is sci too so I can understand your frustrations and fears about all this.
            My dad just had a bone scan done a few weeks ago. Where is his ulcer? Generally they use bone scans to rule out something (like infection) more than to diagnose, if I'm correct. (anyone please correct if I'm mistaken)
            From what I read here though, you are doing outstanding with this, but make sure you are taking time for yourself, we can burn out so easily when dealing with all this. Hang in there none the less and keep us posted!

            Comment


              #51
              Sorry, he has a sacral wound.

              Comment


                #52
                Just got back from a visit with my dad. It was an awesome visit! We talked a lot and laughed a lot. He has movement of his right hand now! And he can feel sensation in his toes when we rub our fingers across them!

                I have a question though. I asked my dad if he can feel anything when they do his bowel program everyday. He said yes. He can feel the suppository going in and he can feel when the nurse is doing the digital stimulation. Please correct me if I'm wrong: I thought that if a patient has feeling in the base of the spine (and can therefore feel if something is being inserted into the rectum) they are classified Incomplete. I've always been told that my dad is a C5 Complete. I have a call into the doctor to get a better explanation as to his exact circumstance, but I just thought I'd ask here, too.

                Comment


                  #53
                  This is really good news that he has movement in his right hand and sensation during the bowel care.
                  IMO, he is incomplete due to fact that he has movement in his hand and sensation donw to his toes.
                  Did they did ASIA test when he first got admitted to VA Cleveland?

                  They tested my son when he first got admitted to VA SanDiego and before he got discharged.

                  Comment


                    #54
                    tmrperry, he should have another complete ASIA exam. If he has feeling at the anal sphincter, this would indicate that he is now an ASIA B (incomplete). Keep us posted.

                    (KLD)
                    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                    Comment


                      #55
                      When I asked one of his doctors, she confirmed that he is a C5 Complete ASIA A. (Although she said that his left side was C5 and his right side was C7.) I told her about his feeling, but she said something about it being inconsistent maybe? She did say that they evaluate a few times during the first year and then yearly thereafter. So maybe we'll see at his next eval???

                      Comment


                        #56
                        I have more questions and hope someone can shed some light for me. My poor Dad, if he knew I had to discuss his bowel movements on the internet, I think he'd die!

                        Before my dad's injury, he was very healthy and would have BMs usually around twice per day. The nurses have been doing his bowel program (digital stim) only 3x per week. He's been on a regular solid food diet for about a month now and for the past week or so he's been having BMs a few times a day again. Is this his body regulating itself back to his normal frequency or could something else be going on? They took a sample of his stool just to be sure, but it seems to me that if someone had a BM 3x per day you would do their bowel program more than just 3x per week. Also, his stool is on the runny side yet they want to give him more fiber via fiber supplements. Won't this exacerbate the runny stools? Any help is appreciated. (Oh, I was told he has an upper neuron spastic bowel - if that helps at all.) Thanks!

                        Comment


                          #57
                          Is he also on a suppository?

                          If all his stools are runny, then they need to do a c. diff. tox screen first before doing anything else.

                          If that is ruled out, and he is not getting medications that would give him loose stools (what is he taking now???) then medication can be used to firm up the stool. Metamucil, etc. does not work well for this, but Fibercon (calcium polycarbophil) can be quite helpful. Imodium can also be used, although long term use is discouraged.

                          While many people with SCI do fine on a 3X weekly bowel program, in spite of how often they had stools before (because their bowel motility is decreased now), if he is having accidents, he should go back to a daily bowel program at least.

                          Is he in a rehab center or a nursing home?

                          If you have not already done so, you should download this booklet for both of you to read:

                          http://www.pva.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=8095

                          If the rehab unit or nursing home does not already have this, and does not already base their procedures for bowel care upon this, download it and give it to the head nurse or nurse educator:

                          http://www.pva.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=7651

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                          Comment


                            #58
                            Another question: What is the normal procedure for removing a trach? Is the patient's O2 saturations monitored somehow afterwards until they know for sure that everything is okay? (to make sure mucous doesn't choke the patient)

                            Comment


                              #59
                              I'm sorry to report that tmrperry's father passed away on the 20th of April from a pulmonary embolism. He had a large and loving family and will be missed by all. My sympathies to the family.
                              Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

                              Comment


                                #60
                                I don't have the final autopsy report yet, but I know it wasn't a pulmonary embolism. That was their guess, but they were wrong.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X