Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Human neurons from chimeric avian/human spinal cords

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Human neurons from chimeric avian/human spinal cords

    https://newjerseyneurons.com/

    This an application of previous experiments that showed that human cells (Mesenchymal cells from bone marrow) introduced into the neural tube (that gives rise to the spinal cord) are 'induced' to transform into neurons. This is not restricted to the neural tube but is true in general of all mammalian cells introduced into chick embryos. For example mammalian somites, that are supposed to become muscles or bones normally, DO turn into muscles or bones when introduced into the somitic territories of a chick embryo. The idea here is to consider the chick embryo as an 'inducer' of differentiation, thanks to the conservation of early developmental mechanisms between mammals and birds.

    In the case of the spinal cord, of course it is necessary to recover the human cells alive after they have differentiated into neurons and remove all avian component from the chimeric spinal cord.

    Human cells that turn into motor neurons inside chick neural tubes accept synaptic connection and project neurons to spinal ganglia, therefore it must be possible to 'train' these induced neurons to fire up up. A chick embryo is capable of movement in ovo very early as a response to avoid light. It is a proof that motor neurons are active in these embryos, with a circuit that goes from the eyes retina, to the brain, down the spinal cord and muscles.

    Is it a better system than induction by transfection vectors and genetic engineering to produce induced neurons or neural stem cells ?
    It's certainly different. The neural tube is a powerful inducer of differentiation into neurons and glial cells. One should think that induced human neurons that have fired up inside the neural tube of an avian chimera 'should' be able to do so inside the spinal cord of their initial donor. But of course, that remains to be proven.
    Is it an ethical system to produce human neurons ? yes IMO, because the chimera are sacrificed long before hatching.
    Is it Safe to re-transplant the neurons into their human donor ? the fertile eggs are screened for all sort of pathogens. They are scientific grade fertile eggs and quite expensive. But a risk of contamination by avian retroviruses is probably not null. However since no immunosuppression is necessary after transplantation (neurons are autologous), the immune system may be able to deal with avian viruses/retroviruses.

    This is the theory, that can only be proven AFTER clinical trial, if that ever happens in the future. Meanwhile, there is nothing for sale displayed in the web site yet. If there is anything for sale in the near future, it will be CHICK embryonic neurons, not humans (therefore for research). If human induced neurons made with this method are ever going to be for sale, it will be for research only.



    #2
    Thanks for the info, it's very interesting. Some questions if I may:

    How do you plan to transplant the neurons back into the human cord?

    Have you tried this with animal models to see if they got any functional improvements?

    Comment


      #3
      interesting ...I look forward to seeing where this goes
      "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

      "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


      2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
      Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by niallel View Post
        Thanks for the info, it's very interesting. Some questions if I may:

        How do you plan to transplant the neurons back into the human cord?

        Have you tried this with animal models to see if they got any functional improvements?
        I focus only on neuron production, after that it'd be up to spine doctors. But i imagine direct delivery in the site of injury would be best. That doesn't preclude other treatments in addition to neuron delivery.

        No i did not do animal model. I hope to do it though. Do a full spine transection on a mouse, take bone marrow and other cells and derive neurons, wait 2 months and retransplant neurons embedded within a sticky gel.

        Comment


          #5
          Should be tried sooner

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Ric2057 View Post

            I focus only on neuron production, after that it'd be up to spine doctors. But i imagine direct delivery in the site of injury would be best. That doesn't preclude other treatments in addition to neuron delivery.

            No i did not do animal model. I hope to do it though. Do a full spine transection on a mouse, take bone marrow and other cells and derive neurons, wait 2 months and retransplant neurons embedded within a sticky gel.
            Thanks, it's very interesting. It's good to have someone looking at an alternative approach with stem cells.

            Comment

            Working...
            X