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Icon Wheelchairs - new US pricing for the Icon A1 - $2,595 msrp

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    Icon Wheelchairs - new US pricing for the Icon A1 - $2,595 msrp

    We're reducing our US msrp from $3,295 to $2,595 for the Icon A1.

    We're introducing a pediatric model, and will shortly be announcing a new model with a trim package that will include some shiny carbon bits.

    Icon fits.

    #2
    I know that has to hurt with all of the investments you have all made, but I hope this gives Icon some traction for people who are funded by short sighted governments. I hope that you can make it up in volume and shiny carbon bits, because they look nice

    Originally posted by JeffAdams View Post
    We're reducing our US msrp from $3,295 to $2,595 for the Icon A1.

    We're introducing a pediatric model, and will shortly be announcing a new model with a trim package that will include some shiny carbon bits.

    Icon fits.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

    Comment


      #3
      We're reducing it because as we grow, we get more efficient, and we get better pricing on the parts we make (the more material you buy, the less it costs because of volume discounts).

      We need to make this a viable business, but this isn't a get rich quick scheme for us. As we can and when we can, we're passing the efficiencies and savings on to the people we're working for.

      Comment


        #4
        I had no doubts about that Jeff. I completely believe in what you guys are doing, even though we don't even have an Icon. Maybe someday....

        Originally posted by JeffAdams View Post
        We're reducing it because as we grow, we get more efficient, and we get better pricing on the parts we make (the more material you buy, the less it costs because of volume discounts).

        We need to make this a viable business, but this isn't a get rich quick scheme for us. As we can and when we can, we're passing the efficiencies and savings on to the people we're working for.
        Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

        Comment


          #5
          Well, being the cheapskate that I am...you caught my interest and I looked at your website...wow! Now that has gotta be the least headache producing wheelchair system ever. Not sure what measurements to order...total non-issue with that thing. And at that price point it is extremely competitive for sure, if not blowing away the competition feature-wise. I like the minimal tool requirements too, nice design!

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by JeffAdams View Post
            We're reducing our US msrp from $3,295 to $2,595 for the Icon A1.

            We're introducing a pediatric model, and will shortly be announcing a new model with a trim package that will include some shiny carbon bits.

            Icon fits.
            All great and welcome news, Jeff! Are there still plans (on the near horizon!) to offer the frame in different colors?
            stephen@bike-on.com

            Comment


              #7
              I think the paediatric model is a great idea. Speaking from experience, you've designed a great chair for a growing child. Not just that, but every time I find something new for my son's chair (Firefly for one, extra wide wheels/tyres for another), I can just adjust the Icon to accommodate the new stuff. And now that the new footplate design accommodates the Freewheel, all is good!

              Might have to buy a second one at the new low price, just because...!
              Gordon, father of son who became t6 paraplegic at the age of 4 in 2007 as a result of surgery to remove a spinal tumour.

              Comment


                #8
                I would love to try one of these for that suspension, but no dealers where i am yet. If you ever choose to expand into wisconsin, froedtert in milwaukee wisconsin is the go-to place for spinal injuries and many other people in wheelchairs for most of wisconsin. I would love to see a dealer in this location

                Comment


                  #9
                  @Stephen - We can powder-coat the chassis in 14 colors right now on special request. We can't do a lot of the other parts because our tolerances for the parts that move are way too tight, so for example, we can't paint the front wings because they telescope into the chassis.

                  I just asked our supply chain engineer to keep a number of axle brackets and castor arms out of the anodizing run, which we'll polish and do a clear coat on to see how that looks - I put a set of bare aluminum axle brackets on my chair a little while ago, and they looked good, I'm not so sure that the castor arms will, but I think we'll probably offer some ano packages in limited colors and on a few parts in the future.


                  @juniorsenior - we will sell to ANY dealer that a customer wants to use. We generally expect that they have a physical location with a showroom and a service department, but even then we'll make exceptions sometimes. We have a dealer on the west coast who services rural areas that doesn't have a physical location or a showroom, but he drives around with a mobile shop in a converted vehicle, and we had a customer request/vouch for him. We are 100% committed to the idea that it's up to the customer to decide who they want to deal with, so we do not and will not engage in any exclusive agreements.

                  For the big network dealers, we're uploaded in the sales system with National Seating and Mobility, and there is one in Milwaukee - we also have an Icon rep in Wisconsin.


                  If anyone ever gets told by a dealer that they "can't" get an Icon in for you to trial, it's absolutely not true.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    juniorsenior, I want to agree with what Jeff's saying. There was no one near me that had the Icon, but I had contacted Jeff and he said he'd start working on arranging a trial for me. I contacted the dealer I wanted to work with, Jeff contacted the rep who would be responsible for my area (he's in ohio, I'm in Indianapolis) and it was set up to bring the chair to the dealer I wanted to work with. I'm sitting in it right now, and its AMAZING. The difference is shocking. I remember reading here about how going from a hospital type wheelchair to a custom ultralight is like going from a peg leg to a modern prosthetic. Well going from my chair to the Icon was like going from a cheap prosthetic to the top of the line-best you can get prosthetic! I finally understand what people mean when they say the chair should feel like an extension of yourself. I thought my chair felt like that, but now I truly know what it is.

                    The rep had forgotten to leave the shock pump, so the first day (thursday) it didn't have the shock and I was still in love with it. Now with the shock correctly set I don't even know the words for what I feel about this chair. We couldn't set up the antitippers on it with my low/tiny dimensions. I was a bit nervous but figured since its only a few days I'll be fine. I've only ever flipped backwards in my chair once and that was my own fault while stationary. I was never going to go without anti tippers, using them for curbs and as a failsafe because I have cervical instability and could damage my cord if I went backwards on my head. But I feel so much more stable, I assume its both the better fit and the way the weight is distributed. I've even gone down my first curb! And up a little curb alone! I had some time before my appointment so I found a low spot at the sidewalk and started going up and down it. As I got confidence I went down a little higher spot. The shock makes it really forgiving, at one point I landed really heavily on one wheel first, and I think if it hadn't been for the suspension I'd have fallen over sideways. Its got me believing maybe I can go without anti tippers. I don't know if I'll ever have the strength to go up big curbs, but its got me believing I can learn to go down them safely. Its going to be a big (and difficult) decision for me to make now between the safeguard of anti tippers for my cervical risk, balance issues, and hand/arm fine motor control; and this new found freedom.
                    Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

                    I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      @Jeff, what do ICON's anti-tippers look like? I can't find a pic.

                      @Lin, I'm fascinated by your anti-tipper experience. My sense of need for a 5th wheel anti-tipper is one of my trepidations about getting an ICON. I have dysmetria, cannot reliably hold a wheelie, and have cracked my head twice while not using anti-tippers. I would absolutely feel thrilled to be able to not have anti-tippers. Is holding a wheelie really all about proper chair configuration?

                      My anti-tipper:Click image for larger version

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                      Chas
                      TiLite TR3
                      Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
                      I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

                      "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
                      <
                      UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Here you go Chas:
                        1. The anti-tipper clamp mechanism, which is part of the same clamp used to hold the axle in position (ie loosen that clamp and you can rotate the anti-tip, and also move the axle in or out wards)
                        Click image for larger version

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                        2. With the anti-tip in place. Note we did have a problem when my son was smaller, as the base of the back rest assembly would clash with the anti-tips (when the suspension compressed) if we had them set as high as my son wanted them. In fact you can see how there is almost no gap in the (old) photo below. That may be the problem that Lin is having? Now my son is taller and we've raised the seat height, there is no clash.
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                        3. Chilling out!
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                        i ended up cutting off the anti-tip wheels, as they rattled a bit, and weren't needed by my son. I've put plastic caps on the end of the cut section...much neater result in my opinion.

                        Chas, I see no reason why you couldn't have a single anti-tip assembly like yours attached to the Icon. It would just need to be the correct diameter for the clamp assembly, and the exact distance between clamps.
                        Gordon, father of son who became t6 paraplegic at the age of 4 in 2007 as a result of surgery to remove a spinal tumour.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          The anti tippers that came on my demo chair didn't have a curve like that, they were one long bar. When I first saw the chair the seat height was much higher than I needed it, the anti tippers were only about an inch above the floor, and the top barely had any clearance before the seat. They also stuck out quite far behind the wheels. There are various items on the chair that are older than the current A1s coming out as well. The same clamp though. We tried angling them up, but they stuck awkwardly so far behind the wheels still, and trying to shorten them made them ram into the seat before we had even lowered the rsh all the way for me. They looked to be too long even for the chair before we sized it down to my dimensions. And my DME guy commented that they would probably need to be cut down to the correct length to be usable any higher than an inch off the floor.

                          I'll get a picture of the anti tippers on my Q7 (the dealer kept the Icon ones) tomorrow, they're quite high up like your single one. I think I measured around 8-9 inches under the casters when I set them. Mine have rollerblade wheels instead of the little plastic things. I can't spin on them, but I can roll backwards and forwards easily.

                          I don't think its JUST the proper configuration making it safer for me to be without them, I think thats a big part which I was already expecting because if I sit in my chair without the cushion, finally being low enough between the wheels I have so much better control over the chair, and the difference in balance with a wheelie is huge. I think having the weight distributed primarily directly under you, and then much lower to the ground with the front wing design makes the chair much more stable in a wheelie and easier to control. I'd definitely recommend giving the chair a shot! I'm really amazed at the things I'm able to do in it that I couldn't do before.

                          The OT who is doing my wheelchair eval has blown off every attempt I've made to get her to meet or talk with someone about the Icon since she knew nothing about it. Wouldn't even email Jeff, wouldn't email the area rep but I gave him her email and he told me she would be attending the demo of the chair when it was dropped off at my DME. My DME guy said nope she didn't show. I've kept her up to date with all of the back and forth organizing the demo, and there was a possibility of Jeff himself coming down and she had no interest in meeting with him even! Its actually gotten me quite angry at this point, because I don't know what to expect if she is going to try to argue against the chair. If she does I'll fight tooth and nail at this point. Before trying the chair, I had decided if they didn't agree to an Icon I would refuse a new chair at all, because I know there is no other chair available that meets my needs better than my current chair. So I'd rather wait 2 years and get an Icon through medicaid than waste funding on a chair I wouldn't be able to use. But now after trying it, it would kill me to have to wait 2 more years! I've talked about the chair and showed it to a few of my Drs, and my physiatrist sent me out an order for a new chair thats "fitted with an air shock suspension for her joints", and I saw my geneticist friday and he's going to be sending me a letter explaining how well the suspension and adjustability caters to my disability and very specific and frequently changing needs. I don't go into anything lightly, thats why I started researching so far in advance, then determined who would be doing my evaluation and contacted her well in advance to ask if she was familiar with the Icon, Smart Drive, and speedy-lift vehicle lift. But the way she's blown off everything about the Icon has me preparing for war. Hopefully everything will go smoothly, who knows maybe she's blown it all off because she trusts that I know what chair is best and doesn't feel the need to go in depth (which would still be lazy, because of the next person that might be best helped by the Icon). But if she disagrees at all I am READY.
                          Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

                          I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I'll vouch for Jeff's willingness to work with any dealer. I messaged Jeff last week asking about a demo out here in bc, in no time Jeff was back to me with the sales reps contact info, I linked up my dealer with the sales rep and I'm hoping to see the demo this coming week.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Thanks Gordy and Lin. Very helpful


                              Originally posted by ~Lin View Post
                              . . . But if she disagrees at all I am READY.
                              You go, girl!!
                              Chas
                              TiLite TR3
                              Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
                              I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

                              "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
                              <
                              UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

                              Comment

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