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    Originally posted by dan_nc
    Wow there are a lot of non-Orthodox Jews here.
    hahahaha, Dan.

    Sean,

    I am not trying to convert you. You have the law so you will die by it. I am only stating how Christians are all races by inheritance. I am as much Jew as you if I believe in Jesus.
    I'm responding to you on the christian thread.

    Comment


      Please attack the idea not the person or this thread will be locked .
      Thank you ,
      Dogger
      Every day I wake up is a good one .

      Comment


        Ok ok, what if I LOVE Barbara Streisand, have seen "Schindler's List" like, five times and two of my doctors are Jewish?

        Am I slightly less goy?
        And the truth shall set you free.

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          Originally posted by NoDecafPlz
          Ok ok, what if I LOVE Barbara Streisand, have seen "Schindler's List" like, five times and two of my doctors are Jewish?

          Am I slightly less goy?
          LOL. Thanks for bringing such much needed humor to the thread. I'll consider you less goy if you admit to crying to Schindler's List.

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            Originally posted by hardluckhitshome
            LOL. Thanks for bringing such much needed humor to the thread. I'll consider you less goy if you admit to crying to Schindler's List.
            How could you not?

            The parents running after the kids on the train - just too much.
            And the truth shall set you free.

            Comment


              Originally posted by NoDecafPlz
              How could you not?

              The parents running after the kids on the train - just too much.



              What's painful about that scene is how the parents are so happy that they survived selection themselves but their joy is only for a minute when they realize what's happening to their kids. There was no sustained joy - the next minute was heartache in the camps.

              Comment


                I drew a lot of strength post injury reading and re-reading Viktor Frankl's "Man's Search for Meaning".

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                  Originally posted by alpentalic
                  I drew a lot of strength post injury reading and re-reading Viktor Frankl's "Man's Search for Meaning".
                  Is he a survivor? I think I've heard of this book or seen in a synagogue's library once.

                  Of my 4 grandparents, only 1 was in the camps - my paternal grandmother. She was sent from Germany to Poland and then later back to Germany (Bergen-Belsen). She always told me how the food was so putrid smelling and foul that nobody could eat it at first out of repulsion. By a few weeks, she came to relish it and thought of nothing but it. After that, she said no food ever tasted bad to her for the rest of her life. It's amazing how your psychology changes even down to how you taste your food.

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by dan_nc
                    Is it a threat if you say, "God will deal with them and give each what he deserves?"
                    I put that up there with Karma. What goes around comes around. Otherwise there are a lot of Christian leaders out there that teach the same. It used to be called 'fire and brimstone' and was not restricted to Christians only.
                    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by hardluckhitshome
                      I'll consider you less goy if you admit to crying to Schindler's List.
                      Guilty here too. And reading several books on Raoul Wallenberg was a good downer one semester.
                      Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                      Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                      Comment


                        Shabbat Shalom!

                        Hey everyone,

                        Just wanted to wish all my jewish friends a good Shabbos! Shabbat starts this week where I am tonight at 6:24pm US/Eastern and ends tomorrow night at 7:20pm US/Eastern. I'll miss everybody while I am away but will probably be back on minutes after Havdalah lol.

                        Shabbat Shalom!!

                        Sean/yaakov Tzvi

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by hardluckhitshome
                          I'll consider you less goy if you admit to crying to Schindler's List.
                          I saw that movie with a couple of friends, one of whom is Jewish. At one point, I was crying and looked over at my friend. I was a bit surprised that she did not look more distraught. She noticed my confusion and quietly explained to me that she was not immune to the story or the images, but that she had seen and heard so much of this growing up (her grandparents were holocaust survivors) that she was able to maintain a bit of distance at that point. That made sense to me. Sort of like how I can explain in great detail about my accident and many of my surgeries without showing a lot of pain.

                          C.

                          Comment


                            Shavua Tov everyone! I hope all my jewish friends had a restful Shabbat and all my goyim friends had a nice weekend.

                            Tiger Racing, thanks for your post:

                            Originally posted by Tiger Racing
                            I saw that movie with a couple of friends, one of whom is Jewish. At one point, I was crying and looked over at my friend. I was a bit surprised that she did not look more distraught. She noticed my confusion and quietly explained to me that she was not immune to the story or the images, but that she had seen and heard so much of this growing up (her grandparents were holocaust survivors) that she was able to maintain a bit of distance at that point. That made sense to me. Sort of like how I can explain in great detail about my accident and many of my surgeries without showing a lot of pain.

                            C.
                            Your friend's attitude is similar to my parent's generation. They were not Holocaust survivors themselves but their parents were. How could my parents' generation, as children, ever complain about anything? About the food, their clothes, their chores? There would always be that guilt hanging over you when you are unsatisfied with something, so there was always pressure to try to be satisfied because your parents really did have it so much worse.

                            I think my generation is more fascinated by the Holocaust because time has passed but yet still so recent that our grandparents and many elderly people in our congregations are survivors. Their stories are so fascinating. My grandmother (or Bubby as we call them) told me this story that when she was first deported, a policeman she had known saw her and felt sorry for her. He kept motioning with his head for her to run away but she did not understand at the time what he meant until the opportunity had passed. She and her mother were sent to Auschwitz and they were sent to work rather than being gassed.

                            The most painful story we ever have to hear is when she talks about the time they removed her from Auschwitz to Bergen-Belsen. Her mother (my great-grandmother) was not selected to go and so had to stay behind in Auschwitz and when my grandmother was walking with the rest to the train, she strained her neck all the way looking back until she could not see her mother and that was the last image she had of her.

                            Sometimes I am afraid that it's going to happen again soon because the Jewish people have a major persecution every few decades. It will never end until Mosiach comes. I don't know where it will be (in the diaspora or in Israel?), when it will be (20 years? 100 years from now? next year?). But I am afraid for my nephews and nieces, for my future children, even for my generation because I know it's going to happen again - either we'll be expelled, enslaved, exterminated. I feel like we can never relax.

                            kol tuv,
                            Sean

                            Comment


                              Hey guys,

                              I thought I would 'resurrect' this thread to address a question posed to me by friend on this site. He asked me about a passage in the Bible that describes the circumference of an iron tub but the description of which would be impossible since it would give an incorrect figure for pi.

                              The Christians will find this interesting too since this passage is also in their Bible.

                              Let me translate some Hebrew words for you here and then you could read the explanation:

                              Shlomo HaMelech - King Solomon

                              Melachim - Kings (as in Book of Kings) but I think it's in Chronicles in the Christian bible.

                              Pasuk - Verse

                              Gematria - Hebraic numerology and codes. Sort of mystical.

                              The Vilna Gaon was such a renowned genius, they say he used to study math in the bathroom, when he couldn't learn Torah. He offers a tremendous insight into the work of the wisest man of all time, Shlomo HaMelech. In Melachim there is a record of an iron tub. The wording is "ten cubits from its one lip to its other, circular all around, a thirty cubit line would encircle it all around" (7:23). Anyone with a basic understanding of geometry should recognize the immediate question. If the diameter is 10 cubits, as described, then the circumference should be approximately 31.4 cubits, not just thirty! The other abnormality is the spelling of the word "line". The word is "Kav", which is typically spelled with the two Hebrew letters "Kuf" and "Vav". The text here adds an extra (and silent) "Hay," for no apparent purpose. The Vilna Gaon explains this pasuk to be a code of sorts. He takes the crude value of the ratio of the circumference to diameter in the verse, 30:10 (3/1) and uses it as a key. Next he divides the gematria of the word "Kav" with a "Hay" by the word "Kav" without a "Hay." (The spelling divided by the pronunciation.) This is 111/106. Multiply that by the key, 3, and presto, you have Pi. (Pi is the mathematical constant describing the relationship of the diameter of a circle to its circumference. It approximately equals 3.1415. Mathematicians still do not have a finite value for Pi.) Shlomo HaMelech encrypted the value of Pi into the text, with an accuracy to the ninth decimal place, not to be matched by mathematicians until the time of Isaac Newton (1642-1727)!

                              Pretty cool, yes?

                              b'shalom
                              Sean

                              Taken from: http://www.ou.org/ncsy/torah/dt/bereshit/toldos3.htm

                              Comment


                                Very cool and I hate math.

                                OK, next question or two. When did Judaism begin? Who was the first Jew? Were Adam and Eve Jewish or was it Abraham?

                                So far what are the top 5 things that your SCI makes difficult or impossible for you to do to stay within the requirements and prohibitions of Orthodox Judaism?
                                Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                                Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                                Comment

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