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" Murderball"

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    #31
    i cant wait...i'm going july 29th to see it in columbus....

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      #32
      In Canada, Empire Theaters will have Murderball on July 15th.


      http://www.empiretheatres.com/movies...gsoon_main.asp
      Krystal

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        #33
        two days away...

        I'm going to see it on monday with a friend a wheelchair, in vancouver. I'll post my thoughts and the audience reaction after the preview.

        i've got high hopes, and it's getting decent press.

        one of the guys who created it is on the cover of the georgia straight.
        i know him

        check it out... at www.straight.com

        the article is a little to 'they're so brave' for my taste and doesn't review the film, but i guess any publicity is good, right?
        Last edited by v_feige; 9 Jul 2005, 4:56 AM.

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          #34
          I'm surprized that there are quads with such high functioning upper bodies (six pack abs) that don't seem to have similar leg inervation. Is that common with incomplete cervical injuries? Does the opposite ever occur where the lower body functions better than the torso? After watching the trailer, I realized how woefully ignorant I am of how "incompleteness" can manifest.

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            #35
            Originally posted by Wesley
            I'm surprized that there are quads with such high functioning upper bodies (six pack abs) that don't seem to have similar leg inervation. Is that common with incomplete cervical injuries? Does the opposite ever occur where the lower body functions better than the torso? After watching the trailer, I realized how woefully ignorant I am of how "incompleteness" can manifest.
            My first room mate in the SCI rehab hospital was exactly opposite of what most SCI's have. He could walk like normal and everything, but his arms and hands were the only thing effected by his injury. I never understood how that could happen.
            Learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make all of them yourself.

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              #36
              Originally posted by Wesley
              I'm surprized that there are quads with such high functioning upper bodies (six pack abs) that don't seem to have similar leg inervation. Is that common with incomplete cervical injuries? Does the opposite ever occur where the lower body functions better than the torso? After watching the trailer, I realized how woefully ignorant I am of how "incompleteness" can manifest.
              we had a walking quad on our team, and i have seen several at rugby tourneys
              Bike-on.com rep
              John@bike-on.com
              c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
              sponsored handcycle racer

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                #37
                jim, yea i never understood it either...i believe its called ''central cord'' or something...

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                  #38
                  another thing...zupan, one of the guys from the movie, was on tv yesterday....and i happened to notice that he had fully functional hands...he had independent finger movement, able to count like, 1, 2, 3...ya know?

                  so i know he may have had a cervical injury...but he's obviously recovered...so how can he be listed as a quad ''functionally''?

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                    #39
                    You can have finger flexion at C8, but unless you also have your intrensic hand muscles (which spread the fingers) which come in at T1, you are technically still considered tetraplegic. They are pretty strict when it comes to classification in quad rugby from what I have seen with the teams I have been familiar with.

                    Central cord syndrome (which usually occurs with hyperextension of the neck) can cause worse impairment of the arms than of the legs or trunk because the damage is mostly in the middle of the cord, not on the edges. The cord is organized into tracts by both function and destination of the neurons, and those that supply the arms are more towards the center of the cord, while those that supply the legs and trunk are more towards the outside. This is why people wiith central cord injury may have more impairment in their arms than in their legs. It is considered tetraplegia if it occurs in the cervical spine (nearly always) and many are ASIA D.

                    (KLD)
                    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                      #40
                      I have a friend with central cord syndrome.
                      Also, since I can spread my fingers I can't play?
                      jOE
                      www.nwiscig.blogspot.com

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                        #41
                        How lame, it isn't playing here. Guess I'll buy it when it comes out.

                        Thanx SCI-Nurse, I never am sure what I am. On one side I'm para but I guess on the other I'm still semi-quad.
                        Aerodynamically, the bumble bee shouldn't be able to fly, but the bumble bee doesn't know that, so it goes on flying anyways--Mary Kay Ash

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                          #42
                          "Hot Wheels" - Today's Times

                          The New York Times Sunday Magazine Section today has an article about the Quad-Rugby team. Very good.

                          Forget the wheelchairs. They're necessary, of course, but they project an image of vulnerability, and that image just doesn't fit with these guys. Scott Hogsett, Andy Cohn and Mark Zupan have all suffered severe spinal-cord injuries and their movement is permanently limited, but they should not be defined by their impairments. They are rugby players, with all that that entails. They may play the sport in their wheelchairs, but they are tough, fast, hard-drinking, 2-a.m.-strip-clubbing jocks.

                          http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/10/ma.../10STYLE.html?

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                            #43
                            To be able to play quad rugby to just have to have some decreased function in your upper limbs - even if thats a strength score of 3 or 4 in otherwise 'normal' hands. One guy I played with couldn't move his pinky...
                            Emily, C-8 sensory incomplete mom to a 8 year old and a preschooler. TEN! years post.

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                              #44
                              http://www.aintitcool.com/display.cgi?id=20679
                              Hey gang, MiraJeff here with AICN's final (I think) review of Murderball, the amazing documentary about quadriplegic rugby players that everyone and their mother should see as soon as possible. This is a film about the power of the human spirit. It is about tragic experiences shared by men and their collective search for redemption through competition. It is a story about shattering expectations and redefining limits. Above all, it is a film about hope. What is possible for those who have it and what happens to those who lose it.

                              I knew Murderball wouldn't be what I expected when the film opened with a Metallica ambush and some intense trash-talking, mainly courtesy of Joe Soares, the film's main character and a former top-ranked quad rugby player who lead the U.S. team to several world championships. After getting too old to keep up with the younger guys on the court, he defected to Canada to coach their men's team and get revenge on the US team that told him he wasn't good enough for them anymore. Soares is a fascinating man and lives to compete in any way, shape, or form. As hard as he pushes his players, he pushes his son, Robert, even more. Though Robert makes straight A's on his report card, he isn't athletic, and Joe has difficulty accepting that fact. Their unique relationship speaks to the core of the film. The protagonist on the USA side is Mark Zupan, a ferocious competitor and the heart, soul, and spokesperson for Team USA. Zupan was critically injured in a car accident that his best friend was responsible for, driving while drunk. The film touches on their fractured relationship and the pain and guilt that they share. Other players recollect the incidents that left them in wheelchairs, including fist fights, shoot-outs, medical diseases, and a motorbike accident. The courage that these men exhibit is a testament to their sheer will and determination.

                              To keep things light, Murderball also shows us glimpses of the players' personal lives and their individual ways of coping with their disabilities. Every stereotype about quads gets turned on its head as we see them living healthy, normal, full lives. Most of the guys have very positive attitudes and keep upbeat by playing practical jokes on each other (one legless player hides beneath a box to scare people) and discussing their sex lives in a segment that's pretty funny. The guys also go out of their way to tell the audience that quad rugby is nothing like the Special Olympics, where there are no winners and losers and everyone gets a hug. These guys mean business. They're playing to win and to earn the respect of their country.

                              Directors Henry Alex Rubin and Dana Adam Shapiro, along with producer Jeffrey Mandel, have crafted a brilliant film about subject matter that some people might find uncomfortable. The people featured in Murderball know the true definition of what it means to persevere. They live every moment with a balls-to-the-wall intensity that is truly an inspiration to everyone who sees this film, handicapped or not. Murderball is an emotional triumph that left me in tears, with a huge smile plastered on my face. If this film doesn't get an Oscar nomination, the Academy should be shut down for bad taste. If Johnny Depp can get a nod for "Pirates," these filmmakers deserve a gold statue and then some. Bravo!
                              Learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make all of them yourself.

                              Comment


                                #45
                                Originally posted by carl
                                The New York Times Sunday Magazine Section today has an article about the Quad-Rugby team. Very good.

                                Forget the wheelchairs. They're necessary, of course, but they project an image of vulnerability, and that image just doesn't fit with these guys. Scott Hogsett, Andy Cohn and Mark Zupan have all suffered severe spinal-cord injuries and their movement is permanently limited, but they should not be defined by their impairments. They are rugby players, with all that that entails. They may play the sport in their wheelchairs, but they are tough, fast, hard-drinking, 2-a.m.-strip-clubbing jocks.

                                http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/10/ma.../10STYLE.html?
                                Word!!
                                Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies...

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