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For Sherry: Some shocking stats on Med Mal tragedy

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  • For Sherry: Some shocking stats on Med Mal tragedy

    Think about this:

    a.. The number of physicians in the US is 700,000.

    b.. Accidental deaths caused by Physicians per year is 120,000.

    c.. Accidental deaths per physician is 0.171. (US Dept. of Health & HumanServices)

    Then think about this:

    a.. The number of gun owners in the US is 80,000,000.

    b.. The number of accidental gun deaths per year (all age groups) is 1,500.

    c.. The number of accidental deaths per gun owner is 0.0000188.

    Statistically, doctors are approximately 9,000 times more dangerous than gun owners.

    FACT: NOT EVERYONE HAS A GUN, BUT ALMOST EVERYONE HAS AT LEAST ONE DOCTOR.

    Please alert your friends to this alarming threat. We must ban doctors before this gets out of hand. As a public health measure I have
    withheld the statistics on lawyers for fear that the shock could cause people to seek medical attention!

    Writer unknown

    My note: Above does not even include a large number of "survivors" of medical mal-practice

    "Together we stand, divided we fall..."


  • #2
    [img]/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/img]

    The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you choose, what you think, and what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny-- it is the light that guides your way." --Heraclitus
    ..'to be willing to march into hell for a heavenly cause...'

    Comment


    • #3
      LOL Faye [img]/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif[/img] ya shouldnt get me started...ya know how I get [img]/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/img]

      Actually, the stats on this are fairly accurate..people just dont know..it's been a history of our system to hush folks up. And the stats are for deaths..in hospitals..not injuries or other harm..and yes..more die from med mal every year, than die on our highways, breast cancer..etc COMBINED.
      Theres Good docs and bad docs...just like anything else...but the docs have the power to kill /maime us as our lives are in their hands.
      But they can ALSO save us!
      Its all about a change in the system to
      1) Hold the negligent doctors accountible
      2) Hold the medical boards accountible to the public, not the doctors
      3) public awareness, that Doctors CAN and should be questioned and we (patients) be pro-active in our own care.

      Hospital CEOs' pay a heated issue
      Critics say figures blunt any argument for change in malpractice law
      Andy Miller - Staff
      Sunday, May 2, 2004

      Seventeen thousand babies a year.

      The annual baby boom at Northside Hospital --- more deliveries, it says, than any other community hospital in the United States --- helps sustain the Sandy Springs facility's reputation and revenue.

      Its chief executive's pay reflects that success. Compensation for Northside CEO Sidney Kirschner, with a salary of $965,680 plus a one-time bonus of $1 million, topped that of other executives leading Georgia nonprofit health systems and hospitals in their 2002 fiscal years.

      Kirschner's pay is high on lists of Georgia hospital salaries compiled by groups opposing major revisions in Georgia's medical malpractice system. Tort reform was fiercely contested in the recent General Assembly session but failed to pass.

      Bill Clark of the Georgia Trial Lawyers Association, which fought a proposed $250,000 cap on "pain and suffering" damage awards in malpractice cases, says the size of executive pay guts the argument that hospitals teeter on the financial brink.

      "These organizations scream poverty, when at the same time spending exorbitant amounts of money on CEOs' salaries, benefits and perks," Clark says.

      The Journal-Constitution reviewed pay figures from the nonprofit health systems' Internal Revenue Service forms for tax-exempt organizations. Those filings are public information, with fiscal 2002 data the most recent available for all systems.

      They show that executive pay generally is linked to the size of the health system. But there are notable exceptions.

      For example, the Gwinnett Health System, with eight health care facilities, had fiscal 2002 revenue of $313.8 million and paid its CEO, Franklin Rinker, $305,750 in salary and bonus. That figure is more than $100,000 less than several systems with lower or roughly equivalent revenue.

      There also is tremendous variation in benefits and deferred compensation, such as retirement funding, which ranges from a few thousand dollars to almost $500,000. The higher amount was paid to Children's Healthcare of Atlanta CEO James Tally.

      Joe Parker, president of the Georgia Hospital Association, says Georgia hospital CEO pay is reasonable and roughly equal to what nonprofit health care systems pay across the country.

      But Tom Holland, director of the Institute for Nonprofit Organizations at the University of Georgia, says the Georgia health system compensation figures are disappointingly high. "I'm not surprised," because of the competition for health care executives, he adds.

      The Georgia compensation, though, appears lower than the national average. A survey by Modern Healthcare magazine, conducted by consulting firm Sullivan, Cotter and Associates and published last August, found salary and bonus for health system CEOs nationally averaged $679,500 in 2002.

      Only three Georgia health care leaders surpassed that mark in fiscal 2002, according to the IRS filings.

      The IRS filings the Journal-Constitution reviewed pertain only to nonprofit organizations. Pay at for-profit hospitals doesn't usually surface in corporate filings. While the Modern Healthcare survey included figures from for-profit systems as well as nonprofits, it doesn't separate them. Two for-profit health systems in Georgia, Tenet and HCA, each declined to give information on their executives' salaries.

      The editor of the weekly Modern Healthcare, Dave Burda, says CEOs of for-profit health systems generally get higher salaries than nonprofit counterparts, but when CEOs of individual hospitals are compared, nonprofits typically pay more.

      Strong demand

      High salaries for CEOs reflect strong demand for good health care executives, says Meg Garrison, managing principal of Sullivan Cotter's Atlanta office.

      Just like any industry leader, the CEO of a multihospital system must have strategic vision and financial expertise, says Dr. Charles Wickliffe, chairman of the board of Piedmont Medical Center. "The role of CEO of a major health system requires skills and talents on a par with executives in any other business of a similar size," he says.

      Piedmont, like other systems, uses market surveys and consulting firms to help determine pay.

      An organization's financial success appears to affect compensation. Health systems with revenue of more than $200 million dominate the best-paid list, and many of the CEOs head market-leading hospitals with substantial net income. Among them were Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital in Albany, with a net of more than $28 million, and Macon's Medical Center of Central Georgia, at $38 million.

      At financially struggling Grady Health System, whose 2004 revenue is expected to be about $635 million, CEO Dr. Andrew Agwunobi earns a current salary of $380,000, which would put him at the bottom of the top 20 for fiscal 2002.

      Nonprofits that earn net income typically use it for capital improvements and community programs or sink it into cash reserves or investments.

      Northside Hospital's net income in fiscal 2002 exceeded $11 million. Even without his 2002 bonus, Kirschner's base salary of $965,680 ranked No. 1 among CEOs in Georgia. Northside spokesman Russ Davis says the $1 million bonus Kirschner received "had been accruing for many years" and, combined with salary, presents an inaccurate picture of his normal compensation. Davis adds that Kirschner was paid $980,553, with no bonus, in fiscal 2003.

      Kirschner says health system executives should be compared to people running comparably sized businesses in the private sector. Kirschner has that business background: He came to Northside 12 years ago, after leaving the helm of Atlanta's National Service Industries.

      "Health care, unfortunately, has become a business and requires business skills," he says.

      His salary is reviewed each year by a national compensation consulting firm, which "has always deemed his salary to be fair and reasonable," Davis says.

      As in Kirschner's case, bonuses or incentive plans can provide a major pay boost. The incentive system "motivates our staff to perform," says Philip Wilheit, chairman of the board of Northeast Georgia Health System in Gainesville, whose now-retired chief, John Ferguson, received an incentive payout in fiscal 2002 of $188,000, or about one-third of his cash compensation.

      Increases in benefits

      The biggest variation in pay packages occurs in an IRS category called benefits and deferred compensation.

      The highest went to Tally, CEO of Children's Healthcare, who received deferred compensation and benefits of almost $500,000. About half was a one-time payment "to appropriately fund his retirement," said Kevin McClelland, a spokesman for the system.

      Burda, editor of Modern Healthcare, says that nonprofit tax filings are showing higher figures in the benefits and deferred compensation column.

      "One reason is it's a way to increase salaries but not have the increase jump out all at once," Burda says. "A 15 percent pay raise may not be that palatable to the community."

      Some employers, he says, use deferred compensation "to pay artificially high salary increases." Others use it to retain these executives, stipulating that they have to stay for a number of years, Burda says.

      Many different items can be counted under benefits/deferred compensation, "depending on the ingenuity of the accounting office," says Holland of the Institute for Nonprofit Organizations. "Some are golden parachutes, and others vest at retirement.''

      Retirement can bring a healthy payoff for years of service. Henry Medical Center's retired CEO, Joseph Brum, got more than $1 million in retirement funding in fiscal 2002, plus $414,200 he had deferred. Brum, who retired Jan. 1, 2002, had been CEO of the Stockbridge hospital for more than 18 years.

      The wounds of the tort reform fight, though, were fresh in the minds of many health systems as they were surveyed.

      DeKalb Regional Healthcare System, for example, says its malpractice premiums increased $3.1 million to $8.8 million in 2003. The system's net income was about $1 million in fiscal 2002.

      Allison Kelly of Georgia Watch, a consumer advocacy group and an opponent of caps on damages, says high-paying hospitals are wrongly targeting victims of medical mistakes. "I see large corporate hospitals expanding, rewarding their executives, but they are also spending so much of their resources and time on restricting their patients' rights," she says.



      WHAT HOSPITAL CHIEFS ARE PAID
      A sampling of fiscal 2002 compensation for leaders of nonprofit Georgia hospitals and health care systems:



      Organization: Northside Hospital
      Location: Sandy Springs
      Chief executive: Sidney Kirschner
      Salary and bonus: $1,965,680 (2)
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $119,304
      Net patient revenues: $455.6 million



      Organization: Henry Medical Center
      Location: Stockbridge
      Chief executive: Joseph Brum
      Salary and bonus: $1,663,719 (3)
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $3,390
      Net patient revenues: $101.6 million



      Organization: Emory Healthcare
      Location: Atlanta
      Chief executive: John Fox
      Salary and bonus: $703,485
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $39,261
      Net patient revenues: $1 billion



      Organization: Children's Healthcare
      Location: Atlanta
      Chief executive: James Tally
      Salary and bonus: $663,999
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $494,114
      Net patient revenues: $500.3 million



      Organization: St. Joseph's/Candler
      Location: Savannah
      Chief executive: Paul Hinchey
      Salary and bonus: $591,232
      Deferred compensation and benefits: $11,187
      Net patient revenues: $299.6 million



      Organization: Northeast Georgia Health System
      Location: Gainesville
      Chief executive: John Ferguson
      Salary and bonus: $576,536
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $384,877
      Net patient revenues: $282.8 million



      Organization: Central Georgia Health System
      Location: Macon
      Chief executive: Donald Faulk
      Salary and bonus: $566,397
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $79,819
      Net patient revenues: $492.9 million



      Organization: St. Francis Hospital
      Location: Columbus
      Chief executive: Michael Garrigan
      Salary and bonus: $557,442
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $168,346
      Net patient revenues: $128.5 million



      Organization: Saint Joseph's Health System
      Location: Sandy Springs
      Chief executive: Ronald Hogan
      Salary and bonus: $538,925
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $239,940
      Net patient revenues: $218 million



      Organization: Phoebe Putney Health System
      Location: Albany
      Chief executive: Joel Wernick
      Salary and bonus: $533,833
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $13,000
      Net patient revenues: $348.2 million



      Organization: Archbold Medical Center
      Location: Thomasville
      Chief executive: Ken Beverly
      Salary and bonus: $506,342
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $12,037
      Net patient revenues: $204.5 million



      Organization: Athens Regional Health Services
      Location: Athens
      Chief executive: John A. Drew
      Salary and bonus: $491,803
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $219,437
      Net patient revenues: $263.3 million



      Organization: Memorial Health
      Location: Savannah
      Chief executive: Robert Colvin
      Salary and bonus: $482,000
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): N/A
      Net patient revenues: $429 million



      Organization: University Health Services
      Location: Augusta
      Chief executive: Larry Read
      Salary and bonus: $447,426
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $105,849
      Net patient revenues: $576.5 million



      Organization: MCG Health
      Location: Augusta
      Chief executive: Donald Snell
      Salary and bonus: $445,500
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $11,000
      Net patient revenues: $306.8 million



      Organization: Medical Center of Columbus
      Location: Columbus
      Chief executive: Larry Sanders
      Salary and bonus: $413,513
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $11,738
      Net patient revenues: $184.1 million



      Organization: Piedmont Hospital
      Location: Atlanta
      Chief executive: Richard Hubbard
      Salary and bonus: $413,118
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $125,218
      Net patient revenues: $377.5 million



      Organization: WellStar Health System
      Location: Marietta
      Chief executive: Robert Lipson
      Salary and bonus: $407,917
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $4,313
      Net patient revenues: $809 million



      Organization: Gwinnett Health System
      Location: Lawrenceville
      Chief executive: Franklin Rinker
      Salary and bonus: $305,750
      Deferred compensation and benefits (1): $47,619
      Net patient revenues: $313.8 million



      (1) Includes contributions to employee benefit plans and deferred compensation such as supplemental retirement funds; some may be at risk of forfeiture.
      (2) Includes $1 million bonus
      (3) Includes lump-sum payout of retirement benefit and compensation deferred by Brum, totaling more than $1.5 million.



      Sources: IRS Form 990s from www.guidestar.org; individual health systems

      The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you choose, what you think, and what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny-- it is the light that guides your way." --Heraclitus
      ..'to be willing to march into hell for a heavenly cause...'

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by sherry38:

        LOL Faye [img]/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif[/img] ya shouldnt get me started...ya know how I get [img]/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/img]

        Actually, the stats on this are fairly accurate..people just dont know..it's been a history of our system to hush folks up. And the stats are for deaths..in hospitals..not injuries or other harm..and yes..more die from med mal every year, than die on our highways, breast cancer..etc COMBINED.
        Theres Good docs and bad docs...just like anything else...but the docs have the power to kill /maime us as our lives are in their hands.
        Sherry, you might want to check out http://spcpi.homestead.com/
        The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Patients.

        George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950): "Our mission is not to deal with obvious horrors, but to open the eyes of normal respectable men to evils which are escaping their consideration."


        "Together we stand, divided we fall..."

        Comment


        • #5
          Sherry
          you know I went for almost 2 month's before they found my burst fracture I was at a teaching hospital went through rehab.walked and all, then a Nuero Doc came in rehab he found it
          Just goes to show they do screw up!!!

          Oh they told my wife they had 3 spine specalist going over me. I had told them it was broke. I had broken it when I was 13 you never forget. But they would not listen.
          Thank's
          Duge

          T-12 incomplete 10-3-02

          Comment


          • #6
            Faye, thank you so much for that one..I hadnt seen it.

            Duge, yes..I know. ANd before injured, I never ever would have known to question and be very assertive in my care.

            I'd like to reinterate..this is in no ways against ALL doctors!
            (actually not against doctors themselves in any form..only the status quo)

            It was another doctor that saved me.
            And truth is..when I was only a couple months from injury date..and still reeling..and healing
            It was Wise and Spinal Nurse who reached out to me, and helped more than they can EVER know!
            I am eternally grateful, and will never begin to pay back not only the life line they gave me..but the understanding and compassion and patience as well.

            The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you choose, what you think, and what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny-- it is the light that guides your way." --Heraclitus
            ..'to be willing to march into hell for a heavenly cause...'

            Comment


            • #7
              All I can Say is It was too bad I went out of my head with the pain. And did not even know who Dr. Wise Young was. There need's to be alot more awareness! But How does it get out? It's like the old saying "you never think about it till it happen's to you"
              Thank's
              Sherry
              Duge

              T-12 incomplete 10-3-02

              Comment


              • #8
                The payoff could be substantial. A Rand Corp. study released last week found that patients receive the wrong treatment nearly half the time because best-practice guidelines promoted by medical authorities aren't followed. The chief recommendation for fixing that problem: better systems for recording health data and assessing treatments.


                Elements of the Bush plan, which enjoys bipartisan support in Congress, include:


                The Department of Health and Human Services (news - web sites) (HHS) would establish a standardized patient-record format by the year's end so different computer systems could use the same language for purposes such as transmitting X-rays over the Internet and retrieving lab results and prescriptions.


                HHS would offer incentives for users of electronic systems. One possibility: higher Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements.


                Electronic records could better gauge the effectiveness of health providers and ultimately change how they are paid to a system based on the quality of their results instead of the quantity of services. Creation of databases would help patients compare performances of hospitals and doctors. Those who fare poorly would be spurred to improve or risk the loss of business.


                Doubters worry that the push for electronic records could turn into an unfunded government mandate and impose rigid guidelines for treating patients. They say new technology is expensive, and proof is lacking that the investment would pay off financially or result in improved patient care.


                But the cost isn't exorbitant. Studies say electronic systems would run $20,000 to $50,000 per physician. And those who have taken the leap say they make fewer mistakes and provide better service. England is so convinced of the benefits that it's spending $17 billion to wire every hospital, clinic and doctor's office. Each citizen is expected to have an electronic medical record by 2005.


                In a more modest way, the U.S. government is prodding the health industry to convert on its own. HHS says $140 billion a year could be saved through improved care.


                That's certainly worth the investment.

                Source

                "I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use."
                - Galileo Galilei

                Comment


                • #9
                  Blacklisting alleged
                  The bitter divide between doctors and lawyers has been exposed in a range of ways recently.

                  Earlier this spring, a Texas radiologist's Web site, DoctorsKnow.Us, set up a national database of patients and their attorneys who have sued for malpractice. The site's stated purpose was to discourage frivolous lawsuits. But patients and their attorneys suggested the site essentially blacklisted some patients from receiving doctors' services.

                  The site was shut down in March after news reports detailed difficulties people listed on the site had in getting medical care.

                  The refusal-to-treat tactic has generated the most controversy in the conflict over medical malpractice. But more disturbing to many lawyers are the efforts to silence doctors from testifying as expert witnesses on behalf of plaintiffs.

                  In Florida, Tampa General Hospital announced plans in February to revise its employee "code of conduct" by prohibiting staff from testifying on behalf of plaintiffs. (They may testify as witnesses for hospitals and doctors.)

                  Lawyers decry the refusal to treat lawyers and the efforts to silence physicians. The lawyers say doctors want it both ways: They want the legal limits on malpractice lawsuits, yet have no qualms about filing suits themselves.

                  When Hawk began his campaign against lawsuits, critics noted that he had filed one after his wife was in a car accident during the mid-1980s. Hawk's insurance company refused to pay the claim because he filed it three days after the legal deadline for doing so had expired, so he sued. A jury awarded his wife $525,000. But an appeals court threw out the case. It said Hawk's suit was moot because he had missed the filing deadline.

                  "I'm not saying somebody shouldn't have the right to sue," Hawk says. "I'm saying we should ... limit the awards, and in some way make the loser pay so that we don't have a lot of frivolous suits. An automobile accident is rarely a frivolous suit."

                  'Physicians are not bound to treat everybody who walks through their door.'


                  - J. Chris Hawk, Charleston, S.C., surgeon who says he won't treat lawyers unless it's an emergency http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/index.p...&page_number=1

                  "As our cause is new, so must we think anew and act anew" - Lincoln

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here is a story of quadriplegia from Guns, and the dirty dealings of the gun industry:

                    Gun victim mounts struggle to buy plant

                    Quadriplegic teen hoping to destroy thousands of guns like the one that injured him.

                    By PAUL PINKHAM
                    The Times-Union
                    For weeks, 17-year-old Brandon Maxfield held an online fund-raiser, hoping to get up enough money to buy the company that made the gun that left him a quadriplegic.

                    The California youth's plan was to purchase Bryco Arms in a Jacksonville bankruptcy court, then melt down its inventory of 60,000 unassembled Saturday Night Special and other cheap handgun frames.


                    Brandon Maxfield, 17, was paralyzed after being accidentally shot in 1994. Maxfield won a lawsuit against the gun manufacturer and was hoping to raise enough money to buy the bankrupt company and destroy its inventory.
                    CHRISTOPHER CHUNG/The Press Democrat (Santa Rosa, Calif.)

                    But Maxfield, who won a $51 million jury verdict in California that bankrupted Bryco last year, had competition from the company's former plant manager, Paul Jiminez, who bid $150,000. He said he'd get the money in a loan from Bryco's landlord, which the company owes $125,000 in rent -- a classic case of "insider" wheeling and dealing and all that's wrong with the bankruptcy system, according to Maxfield's lawyer.

                    The Grishamesque drama, 10 years in the making, played out Thursday in the staid Jacksonville courtroom of U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Jerry Funk, who said, all melodrama aside, his role is to get as much cash as he can for Bryco's creditors, chief among them Brandon Maxfield.

                    "Where it comes from, as long as it's not al-Qaida or some terrorist organization, we do this all the time in bankruptcy," the judge said.

                    It all began in 1994, when Maxfield was 7. A family friend staying with Maxfield's parents thought he heard a disturbance outside the Willits, Calif., home and got the Saturday Night Special from a dresser drawer.

                    The gun was so designed that he had to remove the safety to check to see if it was loaded. When he did, the .380-caliber semiautomatic slipped and fired, and Brandon Maxfield was shot in the face. He was left permanently paralyzed from the neck down.

                    Maxfield and his family sued Bryco and B.L. Jennings, Bryco's main distributor -- both founded and owned by longtime California gunmaker Bruce Jennings. Last year, an Oakland, Calif., jury found the gun's design defective and Jennings and his companies partially liable.

                    Within days of the verdict, Jennings moved across the country to Daytona Beach, purchased a $500,000 annuity and paid cash for a $900,000 home and hangar, which houses Jennings' Lamborghini and other expensive cars and aircraft.


                    Boxes of guns sit in the bankrupt Bryco Arms manufacturing plant. Brandon Maxfield had hoped to buy the plant and destroy its guns to keep them from reaching the market.
                    The Press Democrat (Santa Rosa, Calif.)

                    Then he filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, his Daytona property protected by Florida's homestead laws, which prohibit seizure of a person's home to pay civil penalties.

                    Source

                    "As our cause is new, so must we think anew and act anew" - Lincoln

                    Comment

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