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If you have half an hour to spare, here is an interesting interview with Ben Carson

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  • If you have half an hour to spare, here is an interesting interview with Ben Carson

    Last year, I interviewed Ben Carson, the pediatric neurosurgeon from Johns Hopkins... there is a surprise in the interview. Wise.

    http://www.researchchannel.org/progr...t.asp?rid=1981

  • #2
    Wise, I must have missed the surprise...what were you referencing?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gettinup:

      Wise, I must have missed the surprise...what were you referencing?
      I missed it as well. On a side note, I am in total agreement of his view on religion - very well said.

      -Lewis
      C5 injury with partial C6 function on left.

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      • #4
        Wise, thanks so much for sharing this with us. It was absolutely fascinating. The surprise must be that Dr. Carson is a creationist instead of an evolutionist? His arguments for his beliefs were presented in such a loving, gentle but logical and educated way. How can you help but listen to him?

        I could sense your personal admiration and respect for this man. I share it. I read much of his book "Gifted Hands" when it first came out years ago. However there was something about his voice and demeanor that was inspiring--more so than just reading his words on a page. So gentle, so humble, so at peace with himself. What an experience to sit down and talk to such a great man.

        And if you have a chance, can you expound more on the "intelligence of the hands"? That was fascinating. Thanks again.

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        • #5
          martha got it. Ben Carson, a professor of pediatric neurosurgery in the bastion of western medicine (Johns Hopkins) argues against evolutionary theory. His suggestion that he sees a lot of deformed people in his practice and that such people die and leave their bones is very original. [img]/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/img] He definitely is an outside of the box thinker. Wise.

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          • #6
            i also thought it was interesting that he believes in creation, yet is not religious. very unique!

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            • #7
              Dr. Carson is brilliant, and is eloquent in his assessment of organized religion. I know that comment will strike a nerve with some but I understand exactly where he is coming from. Being a person of faith does not mean you give up your ability to think for yourself. If anything bolsters his success its that decision to not be controlled by others. That is a powerful life lesson.

              Mary

              PS..Wise, as always..nice suit, great tie [img]/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif[/img]

              If I can see it, then I can do it. If I believe it, there's nothing to it.
              1FineSpineRN

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              • #8
                I really enjoyed this interview. Of course, now I have to buy his book. I sent this link on to my manager and my chief engineer so they can have a listen and maybe learn something. [img]/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.gif[/img]

                Nice tie, wise. Let me guess, your wife picked it out. [img]/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif[/img]

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                • #9
                  Dr. Wise and Martha...this is not surprising to me...this is what black people would call keeping it real. It matters not what area or course of education a black person may choose to endeavor...I believe tht you would find most to be a strong believer and relyer (excuse the vocab) on God. I almost would argue that it is intrinsic...but I don't wanna start any sh*t. Or maybe I already have.
                  Originally posted by Wise Young:

                  martha got it. Ben Carson, a professor of pediatric neurosurgery in the bastion of western medicine (Johns Hopkins) argues against evolutionary theory. His suggestion that he sees a lot of deformed people in his practice and that such people die and leave their bones is very original. [img]/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/img] He definitely is an outside of the box thinker. Wise.

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                  • #10
                    gettin, that was a very strange remark. 1. it's obvious stereotyping, and 2. belief in God and evolution is not mutually exclusive. the interesting point about ben carson is, given his educational background and field, he argues against the theory of evolution.

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                    • #11
                      His original educational background and field is growing up a black man in America. Despite what you state, a more conflicting point about Ben Carson would be that despite his being black he argues support of the theory of evolution without claiming God as the source of all things...I hope that this does not seem argumentative, however, if you give this some thought and study history you may find that I am right...
                      Originally posted by cass:

                      gettin, that was a very strange remark. 1. it's obvious stereotyping, and 2. belief in God and evolution is not mutually exclusive. the interesting point about ben carson is, given his educational background and field, he argues against the theory of evolution.
                      [This message was edited by gettinup on 04-28-04 at 09:01 PM.]

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                      • #12
                        [QUOTE]Originally posted by gettinup:

                        His original educational background and field is growing up a black man in America. Despite what you state, a more conflicting point about Ben Carson would be that despite his being black he argues support of the theory of evolution without claiming God as the source of all things...I hope that this does not seem argumentative, however, if you give this some thought and study history you may find that I am right...[QUOTE]

                        Gettinup, first, welcome to CareCure and thanks for posting. [img]/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/img]

                        Maybe I've misunderstood you, but I clearly heard Dr. Carson arguing AGAINST the theory of evolution and FOR God being the source of all things. The idea of bringing race into this discussion at all is repugnant to me, because as a white female "keeping it real" is actually pretty important to me too.

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                        • #13
                          Martha, this was written in reply to Cass, you and Dr. Wise who argue that it is surprising that the Dr. in question argues against evolutinary theory. I do not find it surprising at all. The fat that I inject the Dr.'s race should not be repugnant...maybe your emotional response to this issue should be psycho-analyzed. Especially since all I did was use his race, as a reason that he would argue against the evolutionary theory. So it is understood...I was stating that it would be more of a conflict, or surprise, in my eyes if the Dr., considering his race (black), were a proponent of evolutionary theory. Black people are, and have long been believers in God...this is not too say that blacks have exclusivity in this reasoning but to simply support my reaoning in saying this (the Dr.s belief) is not surprising to me...Oh, and thank you for welcoming me...this site is the best[QUOTE]Originally posted by martha2:

                          [QUOTE]Originally posted by gettinup:
                          His original educational background and field is growing up a black man in America. Despite what you state, a more conflicting point about Ben Carson would be that despite his being black he argues support of the theory of evolution without claiming God as the source of all things...I hope that this does not seem argumentative, however, if you give this some thought and study history you may find that I am right...

                          Gettinup, first, welcome to CareCure and thanks for posting. [img]/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/img]

                          Maybe I've misunderstood you, but I clearly heard Dr. Carson arguing AGAINST the theory of evolution and FOR God being the source of all things. The idea of bringing race into this discussion at all is repugnant to me, because as a white female "keeping it real" is actually pretty important to me too.

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                          • #14
                            [QUOTE]Originally posted by gettinup:

                            His original educational background and field is growing up a black man in America. Despite what you state, a more conflicting point about Ben Carson would be that despite his being black he argues support of the theory of evolution without claiming God as the source of all things...I hope that this does not seem argumentative, however, if you give this some thought and study history you may find that I am right...[QUOTE]

                            actually, i have studied history. one of my degrees carries a minor in it. one of my major degrees carries several studies in black writing in America.

                            i assume your statement means to say it would be more conflicting if he argued as you state above (since you said the opposite of what he did).

                            i fail to see the relationship between being black and support/non-support of evolution or belief/disbelief of God. do you have statistics/studies to support such an assertion?

                            and again i will say belief in God and belief in evolution are not mutually exclusive.

                            and why do you suggest martha should be seen by a psych and that her response is "emotional"? i submit this tells us much more about you and your response.

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                            • #15
                              Cass, no...statistics are not necessary...suffice is to say that Dr. Carson's belief in GOd over the evolutionary theory is quite appropiate...denial of God would be denial of himself...this statement is deeper than what it seems on its face...this is why study of history is necessary...and not just american history, but of history of peoples in general...and no, i did not suggest martha needed a psych...you said that...however, i stand by my assertion that she had an emotional response to my statement...i.e. "...is repugnant to me (martha's post)"

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