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    Resume help?

    I am in the process of updating my résumé for an engineering job. I was wondering how to handle the two years I was in hospitals and doing therapy? Those two years I was not doing anything engineering related, so there's not anything to put on my résumé.

    Are employers going to think I did nothing in those two years?

    Also, when is it appropriate to mention your disability, in the résumé, before the job interview, wait for the job interview?


    -Scott
    -Scott

    #2
    You can tactfully mention those 2 years in your cover letter. Don't worry about it too much. Be upfront, but not too direct, which has the potential to steer their focus from your job potential. Discrimination still happens. You want to sell yourself & your skills you've aquired. If it were me, my only mention of my injury would be an inquiry if the location was accessible... *after* they offer you an interview.

    good luck bro [img]/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif[/img]

    ______________
    There will be plenty of time to rest when I'm dead and gone, until then, 150% straight ahead....

    Comment


      #3
      Scott: I don't think there is an issue because you were in rehab therapy for two years, and not working in your field. I believe being in rehab for two years makes a lot of sense and shows good judgment on your part.

      I suggest you do a cover letter and explain your circumstances.

      Good luck.

      PN
      The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
      --General George Patton

      Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
      ––Paul Nussbaum
      usc87.blogspot.com

      Comment


        #4
        Slim, I agree with Scott and Paul.

        It is by no means a negative mark on your resume. As an employer who's hired many I would simply appreciate an explanation. I believe that honesty is the best policy.

        Further I would be impressed in your efforts toward recovery, the fact that you want to work and your willingness to try. Good ingredients, imo, for a successful career and a good employee.

        Good luck.

        Comment


          #5
          As a career counselor, I'd say most people who have 2 years missing on the resume may want to consider ways to make that information a bit less conspicuous (i.e. using a functional resume format rather than chronological); and if any questions come up about it, say something like "I had an injury from which I've since recovered, and I am now confident that I have the skills needed to excel at this job..." then give some real examples of how you can show that you can now do this job.)

          Comment


            #6
            also check w/ your dept. of labor
            they have one stop centers to assist anyone w/ job skills, resumes, etc.
            Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

            I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

            Comment


              #7
              Try and position your rehab time in the minds of your resume readers as unique contribution to your ability to create value for potential employers. Speak proudly of it. Engineering is about solving problems and overcomming challenges. You had to employ these principles every day for the highest stakes imaginable where failure is not an option. The fact that you now want to get back into the mainstraem workforce is evidence that you succeeded in solving and overcomming big challenges.

              Make it clear that you are very much looking forward to taking on new challenges in your field of engineering. That is where you want to concentrate from now on.

              I would not be concerned with bringing it up before an interview. If the disability is a problem for an employer as he reads a resume, it sure as hell isn't going to be different after he has experienced an uncomfortable surprise interview. Don't under-estimate how easy it is for an employer to discriminate before someone has been hired. Better to sell yourself "as is" in a resume than wast your time and energy encountering someone uncomfortable with disabilities.

              Finally, don't forget, employers hire people to solve problems. You need to make it crystal clear that you can solve their problems regardless of disability. It would also behoove you to research what problems the company wants the candidates to solve. And if at all possible, during the interview, ask questions about the problem and begin doing the job during the interview.

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks for the advice everybody.

                I do not think I am going to worry about the blank two years. With the economy, other people will have had blank spots in the résumé. Plus the past year and a half have been back in school.

                I think I would be better off "selling" myself in person than in a cover letter.


                -Scott
                -Scott

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