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Where Is Your Place In Line To Get The Covid-19 Vaccine?

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    Where Is Your Place In Line To Get The Covid-19 Vaccine?

    So when will you get the vaccine? Check out where you stand in line with this New York Times interactive tool: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...-timeline.html

    NL

    #2
    is anything about a chronic sci immunocompromising?

    Comment


    • SCI-Nurse
      SCI-Nurse commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes, there is good evidence that people with chronic SCI/D have a depressed immune response.

      (KLD)

    • juniorsenior
      juniorsenior commented
      Editing a comment
      only AIS-D or any of the other ones as well?

    • SCI-Nurse
      SCI-Nurse commented
      Editing a comment
      All levels and degrees of completeness. (KLD)

    #3
    I will be in the back of the line if I get in line at all. I tested positive on Nov 8th. My symptoms were not bad but not pleasant either. But I have anti bodies now and will press on.

    Comment


    • SCI-Nurse
      SCI-Nurse commented
      Editing a comment
      You should still be immunized. Natural immunity from having COVID-19 drops to around zero within 4 months. (KLD)

    • JoeMonte
      JoeMonte commented
      Editing a comment
      I agree, I had Covid and no different than the flu. My doctor gave me a Z-pack and I felt great after a couple days. ill let everyone else get vaccinated first , then think about it.

    • FER
      FER commented
      Editing a comment
      hi, what level of injury do you have? i'm quad c5-c6 and i'm terrify with the idea to get infected.

    #4
    Can you get the shot rather than in your arm? Like my leg? Hate to take any risk on a sore shoulder as there not in good shape now.
    Art

    Comment


    • SCI-Nurse
      SCI-Nurse commented
      Editing a comment
      Actually, it is recommended that all injections (IM, subq, immunizations, antibiotics, pain meds, etc.) in people with SCI/D be given ABOVE the level of injury if at all possible. Absorption is much better there, and in the unlikely case of development of an injection site abscess, you would have better sensation to note an abnormal inflammation at the site. (KLD)

    #5
    Originally posted by Skogy View Post
    I will be in the back of the line if I get in line at all. I tested positive on Nov 8th. My symptoms were not bad but not pleasant either. But I have anti bodies now and will press on.
    """You should still be immunized. Natural immunity from having COVID-19 drops to around zero within 4 months. (KLD)"""

    Not to be argumentative, but you are stating that very matter of factly. There is a lot of evidence that natural immunity after recovery lasts significantly longer in the majority of people.

    Although studies are obviously still being done.

    Here is a link to an interesting article:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/17/h...unity.amp.html

    Comment


    • SCI-Nurse
      SCI-Nurse commented
      Editing a comment
      Not sure what your definition of "long term is" but for me, it is certain longer than 6 months. NY Times is a good news source, but it is not scientific evidence:

      https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...least-6-months (KLD)

    • funklab
      funklab commented
      Editing a comment
      To be fair, KLD, you also posted an article from a news site, just one without as robust a reputation as NYT. Also, to quote the same news article you posted "However, confirmed cases of people reacquiring the infection remain extremely rare." The news article you posted quotes several other sources suggesting at least relatively long term (as long as we are able to study at this point) immunity. Also the one article that you seem to be basing your conclusion on (with a grand total of 34 participants) has a 95% confidence intervals that are so wide as to be basically meaningless. I don't think it is what any scientist would call reliable data. I'm sure their goal was to suggest caution and more studies (which is quite prudent).

      Certainly I'm not saying one shouldn't get the vaccine, quite the contrary. But I have yet to see any evidence suggesting that loss of immunity is rapid or frequent, and there is nothing in that article to suggest that (in fact there's quite a bit in that article to suggest immunity remains at least through six months, though none of it is very strong data)

    #6
    The New York Times is not coming up with their own evidence. They are reporting and linking to scientific journals.

    Regardless, there is still much conflicting information on immunity after recovery.

    However I am in agreement, everyone who can do so should be vaccinated for Covid-19 as soon as possible.

    Comment


      #7
      I know when I'm going to get mine because I'm in Texas
      C4 incomplete since 1985

      Comment


        #8
        Never. I do not do vaccines.

        https://www.facebook.com/john.baxter.1213986

        Comment


        • SCI-Nurse
          SCI-Nurse commented
          Editing a comment
          That is irresponsible and foolish. (KLD)

        #9
        i was one of the first people in line to get the Polio vaccine when it was made available to me. I saw what the dreaded disease did to friends and neighbors. I did not need that on top of my SCI. I have not lasted 66 years post injury by ignoring good medical advice. The Covid virus would do its job on me in about 2 minutes. For several years I served on the human subjects review panel at the University of South Carolina School of medicine that oversaw drug and other research done at the University and local VA hospital. I have confidence in the drug development system. As an aside, when I was a Student at the University of Pittsburgh in the 1960s, I had the privilege of working in the lab where Jonas Salk developed one of the earliest Polio vaccines. I watered and fed the rats. lol

        Comment


          #10
          Originally posted by CapnGimp View Post
          Never. I do not do vaccines.
          Hell, nobody in your neck of the woods has even heard of covid-19

          Take care my friend. You'll be fine without it.
          "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

          Comment


          • SCI-Nurse
            SCI-Nurse commented
            Editing a comment
            This is bad advice. Getting the vaccine should be a top priority for people with conditions that impair their immunity and also who may have limited breathing capacity. You can make bad decisions for yourself, which will also put your fellow community members and family at risk, but don't be recommending it for others who will make a wiser and safer decision to take this (and other) vaccines. (KLD)

          #11
          Originally posted by CapnGimp View Post
          Never. I do not do vaccines.
          For what reason?

          Comment


            #12
            I won't be in a line. On another site out the 19 people who answered that question this morning only 4 said yes

            Comment


            • SCI-Nurse
              SCI-Nurse commented
              Editing a comment
              A foolish decision. Do you make all your health decisions based on strangers' advice on social media rather than health care experts such as Dr. Fauci? (KLD)

            #13
            The following information is from the FACT SHEET FOR RECIPIENTS AND CAREGIVERS, EMERGENCY USE AUTHORIZATION (EUA) OFTHE PFIZER-BIONTECH COVID-19 VACCINE TO PREVENT CORONAVIRUS DISEASE 2019 (COVID-19) IN INDIVIDUALS 16 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER. (Revised December 2020)
            https://www.fda.gov/media/144414/download

            According to this Fact Sheet, if you are immunocompromised you should discuss this with your doctor before taking the vaccine. If evidence suggests "
            people with chronic SCI/D have a depressed immune response," then the decision to get the vaccine should be made advisedly.

            WHAT SHOULD YOU MENTION TO YOUR VACCINATION PROVIDER BEFORE YOU GET THE PFIZER-BIONTECH COVID-19 VACCINE?
            Tell the vaccination provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:
            • have any allergies
            • have a fever
            • have a bleeding disorder or are on a blood thinner
            • are immunocompromised or are on a medicine that affects your immune system
            • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
            • are breastfeeding
            • have received another COVID-19 vaccine
            If you have any of these conditions, I take this to mean the decision for you to take the Covid-19 Vaccine should be made with the benefit of your doctor's advise.

            Some other important considerations:

            WHO SHOULD GET THE PFIZER-BIONTECH COVID-19 VACCINE?

            FDA has authorized the emergency use of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine in individuals 16 years of age and older.

            WHO SHOULD NOT GET THE PFIZER-BIONTECH COVID-19 VACCINE?

            You should not get the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine if you:
            • had a severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of this vaccine
            • had a severe allergic reaction to any ingredient of this vaccine


            WHAT ARE THE INGREDIENTS IN THE PFIZER-BIONTECH COVID-19 VACCINE?

            The Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine includes the following ingredients: mRNA, lipids ((4-hydroxybutyl)azanediyl)bis(hexane-6,1-diyl)bis(2-hexyldecanoate), 2 [(polyethylene glycol)-2000]-N,N-ditetradecylacetamide, 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine, and cholesterol), potassium chloride, monobasic potassium phosphate, sodium chloride, dibasic sodium phosphate dihydrate, and sucrose.

            WILL THE PFIZER-BIONTECH COVID-19 VACCINE GIVE ME COVID-19?

            No. The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine does not contain SARS-CoV-2 and cannot give you COVID-19.


            NL

            Comment


              #14
              I'll sit this one out. I was in the Bronx VA in '76 during swine flu. Only ones who got sick were the ones who took the swine flu shot.

              Comment


                #15
                The Swine Flu of 1976 vaccine used an attenuated “live virus” which increased the probability of adverse side effects among susceptible groups of people receiving the vaccination. The COVID-19 vaccines currently being developed in the U.S. don't use the "live" form of the virus or even a "killed" form of the virus that causes COVID-19. That said it will take a few weeks for your body to build immunity after getting a COVID-19 vaccination. As a result, it's possible that you could become infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or after being vaccinated. There are some side effects that last for about a day. This doesn't mean you have the virus, it means your body is having a response to the vaccine. That is a good thing. Actually, side effects indicate that the vaccine is doing its job.

                The CDC (Center for Disease Control) has published this paper: Understanding mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...ines/mrna.html

                mRNA vaccines are a new type of vaccine to protect against infectious diseases. To trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, they teach our cells how to make a protein—or even just a piece of a protein—that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.

                COVID-19 mRNA vaccines give instructions for our cells to make a harmless piece of what is called the “spike protein.” The spike protein is found on the surface of the virus that causes COVID-19.

                COVID-19 mRNA vaccines are given in the upper arm muscle. Once the instructions (mRNA) are inside the muscle cells, the cells use them to make the protein piece. After the protein piece is made, the cell breaks down the instructions and gets rid of them.

                Next, the cell displays the protein piece on its surface. Our immune systems recognize that the protein doesn’t belong there and begin building an immune response and making antibodies, like what happens in natural infection against COVID-19.

                At the end of the process, our bodies have learned how to protect against future infection. The benefit of mRNA vaccines, like all vaccines, is those vaccinated gain this protection without ever having to risk the serious consequences of getting sick with COVID-19.


                NL
                Last edited by gjnl; 14 Dec 2020, 9:42 PM.

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