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    Sleep

    Why isn't there a forum on sleep. It seems to be a huge problem for me on top of the pain. Just asking how peoople cope.

    #2
    I take a supplement of 500 mg calcium,500 mg magnesium, 90 mg potassium, it is a combo pill which helps me sleep. On night it is not working as Well I take a unisom melt. I do have ambian sleeping pill which I will take if I go a few nights of crappie sleep.this works most nights for me.

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      #3
      I read in several places that the lack of sleep will shorten one's lifespan. Compound that with my quadriplegia and I truly wonder how much time I have left. I go lights out at 10:45 PM and set the alarm clock for 3 a.m. to turn and cath. However, I rarely make it past 2, sometimes even just 1:30. The most amount of continual sleep I get is about three hours. After I cath I rarely get back to sleep, and if I do it's only for another two hours if I am extremely lucky. My overnight caregiver leaves at 7 and then the next one comes at 8. I read in several places that the lack of sleep will shorten one's lifespan. Compound that with my quadriplegia and I truly wonder how much time I have left. Add to this, bladder spasm, decades long severe pelvic pain, very bad shoulder, elbow and hand pain and lower extremity spasm and it is a formula for serious sleep deprivation.

      At bedtime I take gabapentin for neurogenic pain, tizanidine for spasticity (baclofen taken earlier), 10 mg Ambien and four mL of CBD/THC oil (state authorized dispensary). This would probably knock out the average person quite easily. For me, sometimes it doesn't even make a dent. And I am so habituated to Ambien after decades that I don't have it I have some serious insomnia.

      Forget about me trying to get any sleep when in the hospital, I can go an entire week on perhaps an hour and a half per night.

      Due to my declining health and capability I now have an overnight caregiver. I cannot survive without one. It is exhausting for them and it definitely cannot be combined with the responsibilities of my daytime aide. If I did, they would last about 10 days. The serious downside is cost.

      The best sleep I have is every fall when I go for bladder Botox and they hooked me up to IV anesthesia.

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        #4
        I haven’t slept well since my injury in 1994. If I get a couple hours of uninterrupted sleep a night I’m lucky. The longest I went without sleep was 6 days, two years ago, when I was hospitalized with pneumonia. I felt like I was going to die, not from the pneumonia, but from lack of sleep. I began to feel delusional, and my eyesight became cloudy. It was truly awful.

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          #5
          Sleeping in the hospital was okay for my brother. He even ordered an adjustable bed frame just as mentioned here and I helped him to build one. Though we spent a ton of money on finding the mattress which would suit him, we managed to build it successfully.
          Last edited by NickTheTinker; 9 Apr 2020, 1:58 AM.

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            #6
            Originally posted by crags View Post
            I go lights out at 10:45 PM and set the alarm clock for 3 a.m. to turn and cath....My overnight caregiver leaves at 7 and then the next one comes at 8.
            Originally posted by crags View Post
            Due to my declining health and capability I now have an overnight caregiver. I cannot survive without one. It is exhausting for them and it definitely cannot be combined with the responsibilities of my daytime aide. If I did, they would last about 10 days. The serious downside is cost.
            Have you considered changing to an indwelling catheter and getting a turning bed or mattresses? The latter is not cheap, but would quickly off-set the costs of having an all-night caregiver. I rarely recommend indwelling catheters for long term use, but your situation may significantly benefit from making this change. You could do this for a short-term trial to see if it helps.

            (KLD)
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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              #7
              Originally posted by landrover View Post
              I haven?t slept well since my injury in 1994. If I get a couple hours of uninterrupted sleep a night I?m lucky. The longest I went without sleep was 6 days, two years ago, when I was hospitalized with pneumonia. I felt like I was going to die, not from the pneumonia, but from lack of sleep. I began to feel delusional, and my eyesight became cloudy. It was truly awful.
              Have you been tested for sleep Apnea? Sounds like myself before falling asleep at the wheel and driving into a ditch. After being tested for SA and using a BiPap; all that's changed. Sounds scary LR.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
                Have you been tested for sleep Apnea? Sounds like myself before falling asleep at the wheel and driving into a ditch. After being tested for SA and using a BiPap; all that's changed. Sounds scary LR.

                Excellent point, Patrick. I should have brought that up too. Sleep apnea (OSA) is more common in those with SCI, especially in those with tetraplegic injuries.

                (KLD)
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                  #9
                  I tried vaping a bit last year and while it was kinda fun and had a couple pleasurable surprises from it, I didn't enjoy the feeling of tiredness that it gave me during the day so now I set it up to use right before bed. I sleep really good and wake up feeling really rested.

                  I don't do it every night but if I don't feel tired by the time that I should be asleep, I take a nice hit and try to hold it in until I can lay my head flat. Within 10-15 minutes or less and I'm out.
                  As far as the vape fears go, I don't worry because my pen is a high quality brand and my cartridges come from a dispensary in Washington state. In case you're interested its the Pax Era pen, that I use. No buttons necessary to use.

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                    #10
                    Taking anything into the lungs heightens risk of pneumonia, should we encounter the new COVID 19 virus. Edibles are better or the lungs, if less satisfying.

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                      #11
                      I found out I had sleep apnea I think every Quad should be checked for that. I sleep with a cpap now. I wonder how many years I’ve had it and its been ruining my sleep.
                      "Some people say that, the longer you go the better it gets the more you get used to it, I'm actually finding the opposite is true."

                      -Christopher Reeve on his Paralysis

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                        #12
                        When a sleep study is done, what exactly is the process? I can't imagine I'd even be able to sleep, being in a different bed and environment, etc.

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                          #13
                          Sleep studies are now able to be done at home in many areas, for exactly the reasons you cited. I would check with your local sleep specialist to find out the exact process, especially with Covid going around.
                          ckf
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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