Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Any paras tried pushing a shopping cart?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    I agree about meats and produce but I've yet to be dissatisfied with the folks at Kroger. Re: deals I believe I've gotten way better deals using online coupons than in store. They know most people like to hand pick stuff so many places go a bit extra on the online deals, actually. E.g. I just got a coupon code last week for a 30% discount on my whole order from Kroger! There are regular online coupons that are typically better than the in store stuff in my experience.
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

    Comment


      #17
      Curios what type of shoes you wear I used to all kinds of stuff open doors etc got a small pen I eraser size toe wound 8 months ago still not. Totally healed pretty. CReful what my toes come in contact with now


      Originally posted by nevada View Post
      I just stick my feet under the bottom of the cart and push along and steer the cart by my hands if needed. I use the cart as a mother ship so to speak and park it at the top of the aisle and then use the basket on my lap as my gatherer. Once I have all the items that I need from that aisle I curise up the adjacent ones and get my other items. I then return to my cart and unload my items get behind the cart and move down another couple of aisles and repeat the process. I found that the hardest part of my shopping was asking someone to get an item off a shelf that was to high for me to reach and then unloading the items from the cart onto the moving belt at the check out counter. I then let the checkout person bag my items and I load the bags into the cart and then depending on the weather I either push the cart to my car or let one of the store employees do it. I load the bags into the trunk of my car or let the employee do it as I get in the car and break down my chair and I am off.

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by pete4sake View Post
        Curios what type of shoes you wear I used to all kinds of stuff open doors etc got a small pen I eraser size toe wound 8 months ago still not. Totally healed pretty. CReful what my toes come in contact with now
        curious why don/t you save ur engery and time order on line and pick up is so easy and great service

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by August West View Post
          I do that too. But I get concerned about all the weight on my legs for a long time and try to do 2 trips if necessary.

          Any more than that, I ask for assistance. They bring a cart and load everything. Goes really fast that way. But better yet is home delivery.

          The only issues with home delivery are: 1) I prefer to hand select meats and produce, and 2) you don't see the specials that are available in the store. For example, the lowest price on a whole chicken from Instacart may be $3.49/lb whereas I know it's $1.99/lb in the store.
          I shop on line Walmart as that's all they have where I live I always get the lowest price. I do not have home del not offered but caregiver picks on the way here 2 times a month

          Comment


            #20
            I feel like I hit up a grocery store or Lowe's three times a week. I don't find pushing the carts around terribly difficult, but it does tax the wrists and lats. I usually push with one hand on cart and one on wheel, then alternate if one side gets fatigued, using my wrist to direct the cart. This past hurricane season I went to Sam's club and must have had over 60 pounds of water and such in their double sized carts. That was a workout. Usually, the hardest part about it is getting heavy things from inside the cart to either the check out line or into my truck. One hand on the item and one on the opposite wheel for balance. If I think ahead, I'll put one of my laundry baskets in the back of the truck (I have an enclosed shell) and then fill the laundry basket with the groceries (minus any eggs) so that when I get home I can make one trip from the truck to the house. The grocery store I typically swing by has two sizes of carts now, which is great. The smaller one is very shallow and easy to lift things out of.

            Baskets are still the preferred choice if I'm only grabbing a few things.

            Comment


              #21
              I get a laundry basket and leave it at check out. I push the cart backwards.

              Comment


                #22
                been pushing a buggy for 30 yrs....only get's tuff when I fill it up, but it's still no biggy...

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by airart1 View Post
                  been pushing a buggy for 30 yrs....only get's tuff when I fill it up, but it's still no biggy...
                  Someone should have taught me this in rehab... it feels like a super basic thing that I didn't know how to do for years... or maybe it's just extremely obvious and they figure they don't need to teach it and I'm just one of the few idiots who took forever to figure it out.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by funklab View Post
                    Someone should have taught me this in rehab... it feels like a super basic thing that I didn't know how to do for years... or maybe it's just extremely obvious and they figure they don't need to teach it and I'm just one of the few idiots who took forever to figure it out.
                    funk,
                    I was great to have rehab teach this. They forced me to cook a meal, which involved pushing to the nearest grocery store, buying groceries, getting groceries back to the hospital (un-aided), and then cooking the meal in their little kitchen. While at the grocery store, although we were only buying a few things, they showed the best way to push a cart when necessary. The hardest part about that whole exercise was they gave me $10 to cook a meal and the closest grocery store was Whole Foods. I could barely buy a box of noodles and half a tomato there for $10...

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Yeah me too. They took us to the mall. Had to shop. To the grocery store. Had to shop. Off the tarmac. Up and down steps. Etc. I'm surprised to know ADLs like this aren't universally taught! That sucks
                      "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                      "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

                      Comment


                        #26
                        My rehab was 17 days. They sent me home with a picc line too, so I could self administer my IV antibiotics. As soon as I could transfer to and from the chair, it was time to go haha

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by Denied2016 View Post
                          My rehab was 17 days. They sent me home with a picc line too, so I could self administer my IV antibiotics. As soon as I could transfer to and from the chair, it was time to go haha
                          That is horrible. Where did you go? I went through the Shepherd Center in Atlanta and had a really good experience except I finished all my OT/PT goals and they kept me for 2 more weeks. It worked out in the end as I got to learn and practice what they called "advanced skills" like going up and down stairs by myself while in the chair.

                          To echo what Oddity said, I wish there were some universal set of OT type skills that needed to be taught before leaving rehab. If nothing else, home life skills, public transit (including airplanes), and shopping.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by Oddity View Post
                            Yeah me too. They took us to the mall. Had to shop. To the grocery store. Had to shop. Off the tarmac. Up and down steps. Etc. I'm surprised to know ADLs like this aren't universally taught! That sucks
                            i did this in rehab as well, but with a limited budget and only cooking one meal there was no need for a cart. Even now that I know how to push a cart I would still use a basket on my lap if I knew I was only buying one meal worth of groceries.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by Denied2016 View Post
                              My rehab was 17 days. They sent me home with a picc line too, so I could self administer my IV antibiotics. As soon as I could transfer to and from the chair, it was time to go haha

                              My entire hospitalization was only 18 days, from arriving in the ER after being run over, having spinal reconstruction surgery (rods and pins T10-L3 from a traumatic dislocation), and ankle repair (pins and plates), a bladder repair (ruptured), recovery, rehab, to transferring into my car for the ride home. 18 days.
                              "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                              "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by ToastGuard View Post
                                That is horrible. Where did you go? I went through the Shepherd Center in Atlanta and had a really good experience except I finished all my OT/PT goals and they kept me for 2 more weeks. It worked out in the end as I got to learn and practice what they called "advanced skills" like going up and down stairs by myself while in the chair.

                                To echo what Oddity said, I wish there were some universal set of OT type skills that needed to be taught before leaving rehab. If nothing else, home life skills, public transit (including airplanes), and shopping.
                                I’m in Southern California so the rehab was at Loma Linda. Unfortunately my 15 foot ladder fall resulted in a collapsed lung, pneumonia, ventilator, and a destroyed left arm. I was in a coma for the first month. So my hospital stay was 2 months, followed by 17 rehab days. They did a good job, but I can understand why (especially now) rehab used to be months instead of weeks

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X